Update: 1851 Navy or 1860 Army? My choice arrived
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Thread: Update: 1851 Navy or 1860 Army? My choice arrived

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meland View Post
    Oh yeah, Wild Bill preferred his trusty Navies even after the metallic ctgs were available. The 1861 Navy is basically an 1851 Navy with round bbl and creeping loading lever and both share the same size grip frame so, yes they have the same size as the SAA.
    Thanks for the info Meland. I'm leaning toward the 1861, as I have several sets of grip blanks made up for the SAAs. Now to find one at a 'fair' price.

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    I recenty just squired my first BP revolver ... a new 1851 Navy 36 cal Uberti with a nickeld skeleton shoulder stock so much fun!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MARKO65 View Post
    I recenty just squired my first BP revolver ... a new 1851 Navy 36 cal Uberti with a nickeld skeleton shoulder stock so much fun!
    The reproductions are very tempting, and you get a lot of bang for your buck, pardon the pun. My only replica Colt is my Uberti 3-1/2" El Patron, which is my 'carry' gun.
    bighipiron likes this.

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  5. #14
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    During the civil war they did not put crisco on the end of the cylinder. They were too busy fighting. The bullets fit tight and yes they did chain fire. I myself had a chain fire out of an old reproduction Colt Navy. One bullet went down the barrel and one when to the left side of the barrel. I always creased it after that.

    Quote Originally Posted by BisleySteve View Post
    Thanks Big. I use to shoot a lot of BP when I was a young man (70s-80s) and after a while I bypassed the 'Crisco'. I never had an issue either. I was curious as to the standard practice of that time period, especially in the military.
    .45 or More!

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    Shooting an original Colt, or a reproduction for that matter, one should apply the lube. Why take chances? No hostiles attacking. The lube also keeps the gun from fouling up as quickly, so you will get better accuracy longer. Be sure to use the real-deal black powder in FFFg.
    Abwehr likes this.

  7. #16
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    If a properly sized ball consistently leaves a lead ring after being pressed in a chamber, one should have a tight enough seal to prevent a chain fire. I should mention that there are people who contend that some chain fires originate from the cap end and not the muzzle. I've never seen any proof of this, but I do see it mentioned.

    However, if one wants to be safe and avoid the mess of Crisco or whatever, then the best solution I've seen availabe is to use pre-lubed felt pads. They go between the powder
    and the ball, but they serve the same function and are as easy as just pushing into the chamber before putting the projectile in. The big advantage is that they simply eliminate the mess of Crisco or other grease.

    Here's one source at track of the Wolf. You want the one specifically designed for percussion revolvers with the brand name of Ox-yoke

    https://www.trackofthewolf.com/list/item.aspx/174/1

    If you shoot enough it would be ultimately cheaper to obtain sheets of the felt along with the correct size hole punch, then lube the pads yourself.

    Here is a video explaining the process and a formula to use for the lube.



    Cheers
    Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a vulgar brawl

  8. #17
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    Soon after the Civil War J.B. Hickok was presented with a matched pair of 1860 Army revolvers with engraving, nickle plated, and carved ivory grips.
    Hickok was immensely proud of his presentation Army models and prized them above all other revolvers. They were his preferred revolvers after receiving them.
    Most any picture of Hickok will show these Army's butt forward in his sash.
    He carried these guns for the rest of his life, although he also sometimes carried derringer pistols in his large coat pockets.

    Obviously before 1860 he would have carried 1851 Navy revolvers, but best information says that when he had his famous gunfight with Dave Tutt in Springfield Missouri he was armed with a Colt Dragoon, model unknown.
    Like most gunmen he almost certainly owned and carried any number of types of firearms.

    As above, since you're not in a war or running gunfight, it's just common sense to put grease or pads over the chambers.
    There are any number of modern black powder grease sealants available at reasonable prices.
    When I was shooting a 3rd Model Dragoon I used a small mechanics grease gun filled with a modern stiff axle grease which did not melt in the summer heat.
    The small grease gun made application easy and with no mess and the grease was dirt cheap.
    LedZ likes this.

  9. #18
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    This is purely anecdotal, but I was watching a "gunfight" on the street in the ghost town of Calico, CA. One deputy was shooting a percussion Remington copy and damn if he didn't have a crossfire where a couple other chambers went off, too. I think he then played dead because it kept him from killing the bad guy after that as scripted. I thought it was interesting to see in action something I've only heard about before. It ain't just theoretical. That said, great point about holsters possibly getting messy from melting lube.

  10. #19
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    I ended up buying a Colt 3rd Gen 1860 with fluted cylinder. I'll post pics when it arrives from Pittsburg. I'm really looking forward to shooting it.
    azshot likes this.

  11. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by dfariswheel View Post
    Soon after the Civil War J.B. Hickok was presented with a matched pair of 1860 Army revolvers with engraving, nickle plated, and carved ivory grips.
    Hickok was immensely proud of his presentation Army models and prized them above all other revolvers. They were his preferred revolvers after receiving them.
    Most any picture of Hickok will show these Army's butt forward in his sash.

    He carried these guns for the rest of his life, although he also sometimes carried derringer pistols in his large coat pockets.

    Obviously before 1860 he would have carried 1851 Navy revolvers, but best information says that when he had his famous gunfight with Dave Tutt in Springfield Missouri he was armed with a Colt Dragoon, model unknown.
    Like most gunmen he almost certainly owned and carried any number of types of firearms.

    As above, since you're not in a war or running gunfight, it's just common sense to put grease or pads over the chambers.
    There are any number of modern black powder grease sealants available at reasonable prices.
    When I was shooting a 3rd Model Dragoon I used a small mechanics grease gun filled with a modern stiff axle grease which did not melt in the summer heat.
    The small grease gun made application easy and with no mess and the grease was dirt cheap.
    What is your source on that? Most pictures he is wearing 1851's


 
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