Disassembling your revolver
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  1. #11
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    too funny, thanks!


    Quote Originally Posted by leveractionbill View Post
    i used to help out at a gunshop after school. Usually i was given a box or can full of parts and asked to put it back together.
    Will never forget a s&w 357. I couldn't find where a spring and frame screw were supposed to go.
    We didn't have manuals - some times it was a fun game.
    After 2 days of my alloyed time the owner asked how i was coming along.
    Honestly i said, i'm stuck - got a spring and screw and no where to put them.
    He said oh gimme those they're for the browning shotgun i'm working on.
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    .45 or More!

  2. #12
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    I have one specific PP in 38 S&W for the very idea of tearing into it and seeing what I'm doing wrong on the handgun I'm trying to fix. I bet that PP has been apart 2 dozen times. Now it throws over and THAT is driving me nutz cause I don't want to take apart another perfectly good PP to see what the deal is. Karma getting back at me I reckon.

    J.
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ttazzman View Post
    barring cell phone pictures.......its good to have another one sitting there to open up if you need to....

    That's how I learned to do drum brakes on a car...leave one side open and visible while working on the other side so I could refer to how it was supposed to be reassembled. If I had disassembled both I'd have been in deep doo-doo.
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    It was me...I shot Liberty Valance.

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  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by SnidelyWhiplash View Post
    That's how I learned to do drum brakes on a car...leave one side open and visible while working on the other side so I could refer to how it was supposed to be reassembled. If I had disassembled both I'd have been in deep doo-doo.
    I had to laugh when I read that, because that's exactly what I do too. I'm sure a car mechanic would find it easy to turn the shoes correctly, install the springs with the long end this way or that way etc, but it can get pretty confusing if you only do it once in a blue moon. Having the other side to go by is a life saver. And as far as guns go: A digital camera or a cell phone is great, just snap away as you're taking the gun apart and you'll have your reassembly sequence documented right there.
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  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biffjohanson View Post
    I used an Anaconda that was not respected at a pawnshop specifically to see what was inside and to see how well I can polish by hand.

    Do not polish any of the action parts in the Mark III or Mark V actions such as the Anaconda. They're only surface hardened and if polished one can all too easily break through to the soft innards of the part...that can be very unsafe. Those parts are designed to be replaced, not polished. If you want an "action job" on those revolvers about all you can do is replace the spring with a lighter one and some judicious lubrication at wear points.
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    It was me...I shot Liberty Valance.

  7. #16
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    When I started gunsmithing in 1948 it was not unusual for at least one time every week to have the brown paper bag or cigar box come in the shop for a visit.
    The usual 'it fell apart' story was so common that we would laugh in the face.
    Normal charge for bench time was DOUBLED for these miscreants.
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  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiredGunsmith View Post
    When I started gunsmithing in 1948 it was not unusual for at least one time every week to have the brown paper bag or cigar box come in the shop for a visit.
    The usual 'it fell apart' story was so common that we would laugh in the face.
    Normal charge for bench time was DOUBLED for these miscreants.
    Yeah, the infamous "gun in a bag" is one of my favorites. They're never complete either, "the little thingie that always pops out" is usually missing. The good thing about those is that the owners are so embarrassed that they never argue about the price.
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  9. #18
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    Never took one apart for curiosity, only to troubleshoot, repair, modify, etc. mostly SAAs & New Service.


    Projects like this ----->
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  10. #19
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    There are great videos on youtube about how to take the Colt revolvers apart. Let youtube be your friend.

  11. #20
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    Probably what aimed me at later watchmaking and gunsmithing was when I was a little kid I'd be given those tin toys that were assembled with slots and tabs.
    Having no tools I sometimes used my teeth to bend the tabs and disassemble them just for fun.

    When I got my first guns it was only natural to disassemble them to see how they worked, and to clean out the old grease that military surplus rifles were full of.
    The first pistol I disassembled was from one of my older brothers friends who had a Colt Army Special he wanted deep cleaned.
    I had no trouble with it and that got me started with Colt firearms as my preferred guns.
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