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Thread: SAA bolt timing

  1. #1
    Junior Member moose is on a distinguished road

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    SAA bolt timing

    Did the single action always only raise the bolt into the lead of the cylinder notch, or did they sometimes raise earlier (ever in the history of the gun). I understand why people don't want drag lines on a highly finished collectible but isn't there some risk the cylinder could spin past the bolt if its cocked unsmoothly? Seems like from a functional standpoint it should raise immediatly after half cock?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Wyatt Burp is on a distinguished road

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    I'm no gunsmith but SAA's that are timed right won't drag on the cylinder. The problem is when you check the gun on half cock then let the hammer down FROM THAT POSITION without bringing it to full cock first, then letting it down. Because if you do it from half cock the cylinder will not be locked in a notch and then if it's turned by hand to lock it in, the bolt is dragging along the cylinder.

  3. #3
    Senior Member peacemaker is on a distinguished road

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    1875 Ordnance inspection rules called for the bolt to raise to the cylinder (actually called "drop") "one-tenth (0".1) of an inch before entering the notch in the cylinder at full cock."

    Kuhnhausen states that ordnance rebuild specifications called for the bolt to drop at 55-degrees cylinder rotation, which, he says, corrsponds to the beginning of the locking slot leads. He goes on to say "bolts should be timed to drop the bolt at the beginning of the cylinder's locking slot leads."

    This should give the bolt plenty of time to make it into the locking slot even during rapid cocking, given sufficiently heavy spring tension. There's no need to have it drop any sooner, and a marred cylinder is not a thing of beauty to most people.

  4. #4
    Junior Member moose is on a distinguished road

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    Thanks that was comprehensive.

  5. #5
    Junior Member mtone is on a distinguished road

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    One of the keys to peacemaker's post is "sufficient heavy spring tension" meaning the trigger bolt spring. To light a spring could get you in a over travel situation ( some call it "goes by") under fast cocking.


 

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