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Thread: 70 vs 80 Series

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    Junior Member stevegartx is on a distinguished road

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    70 vs 80 Series

    Can any one tell me what the difference between 70 and a 80 Series model . I'm sorry ,I'm new to Colt pistols . I looking to buy my 1st one . Thanks

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    Senior Member gunpoor is on a distinguished road

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    The main difference was the series 80 has a firing pin disconnect/block safety system built into the firing system so the weapon will not fire unless the trigger is pulled (cannot shoot yourself if you drop a loaded series 80). The series 70 did not have a firing pin disconnect/block safety system.
    Colt Revolvers: Elegant Weapons For A More Civilized Age

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    Senior Member flusher is on a distinguished road

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    The Series 70 also started out with a Collet Bushing, which was later eliminated
    Here's one from 1951

    Last edited by flusher; 02-03-2010 at 05:59 PM.

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    Senior Member randyhamrick is on a distinguished road

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    There is an argument "out there" that because of the extra parts involved in the Series 80 models the trigger feels heavier/mushier than a Series 70 trigger. I own both and have found that each works just fine for me.
    Stay safe,
    Randy

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    Senior Member haggis is on a distinguished road

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    The Series 80 FP safety does not have to interfere with trigger pull (although some do). I've not done it with a Colt, but I've worked over the FP safety on a Para P-13, and with a bit of judicious polishing and making sure the levers fully engage, you can't tell that it's in there.

    That said, I don't care for the FP safety on the principle that more parts mean a higher likelihood that something will go wrong, and that's not desirable on a defensive gun. You can get similar drop protection with a titanium firing pin and a heavy FP spring. If you really want a FP safety, the Colt and Para trigger based system has one advantage over the Kimber and S&W Schwartz safety - the trigger system will stop a full auto runaway, and the Schwartz system won't (unless you drop the gun ).

    Buck

  6. #6
    Oro
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    Senior Member Oro is on a distinguished road

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    The Series 70 also started out with a Collet Bushing, which was later eliminated Here's one from 1951
    The "Series '70" always had a collet bushing and that is what started the designation in 1970. That gun pictured is not a "Series '70" It's a pre-70 Government Model. The Series '70 started in 1970 as an incremental design improvement to the traditional Government model. It incorporated a slightly "belled" barrel at the muzzle end and and expanding, fingered bushing to help get improved accuracy without custom fitting match barrels to each gun.

    In 1983, the gun got the firing pin-block safety and the designation was changed to "MkIV, Series 80." The collet/finger bushing remained in use until about 1989. The firing pin block safety is a really good safety system that is fairly invisible to the user and fool-proof. It doesn't affect how well the trigger can be tuned or reliability. It is common that people misunderstand the development of Colt nomenclature and refer to all non fp safety guns as "Series '70" guns - which is incorrect. however, it has been commonly done in error for a while now and even Colt appears to have given up on it as the newer "Series '70" reproduction doesn't have the MkIV/70 barrel/bushing system, it just lacks the 80 Series firing pin safety.

    I have a few "Series '70" guns and love them. I have some Series 80 guns and really, really like them, too. I will but a gun regardless of the "series" as it's more about the quality of the individual gun than any particular safety or feature, whether it's a '70, 80, or a pre-70 style like flusher's lovely gun pictured above.

    My prettiest '70:

  7. #7
    Senior Member skeeeter is on a distinguished road

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    Years ago when I bought my first gun, a 9mm Commander new in the box for $115 I had a scary thing happen. I was carrying it in a Bianchi(sp?) shoulder holster. I was hearing what I thought was a strange noise coming from under my car and as I bent down to look under the car (while seated) the gun slid out of the top of the holster and as if in slow motion I saw it pointed directly at my face at the same time it landed on the hammer which was down on the firing pin with a round in the chamber. At the time I was only concerned about banging up the finish but when I get home I took the round out of the chamber and noticed a firing pin indentation in the primer. It was not as deep as when normally fired but it was enough to scare me and be VERY thankful to be alive. This could not have happened with a 80 series gun.
    I own both a 80 and 70 series and I am not sure if they can be compared. Even say Pythons have different trigger pulls and feel different with the same actions. I too have heard the 80 series is not as clean but mine are. I do like the idea that more simple is better as there is less to break or get jammed up.
    Last edited by skeeeter; 02-06-2010 at 05:02 PM. Reason: add

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    Junior Member nattybumpo is on a distinguished road

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    drop safe

    it was my under standing 80 ser.safety was for a muzzle drop. a hammer fall as described should have been alright assuming a round in the barrel was cocked and locked on safe needing the grip-safety engaged,and the thumb-safety off to fire.if your carrying loaded barrel hammer down like i see a lot of people doing, because they say cocked and locked creeps them out are circumventing mr.browning's genius,and putting themselves and other people in danger.there is no half-cocked on the weapon like the old 30-30 win.rifle,and you were lucky under the loaded hammer down condition scenario and should have gotten on a plane to vegas at that point.but all this was explained to me years ago by a very old german fellow who worked in the same army parkerizing and repair shop in mannheim,g.d.r.we sat there assembling .45s all day long,when we weren't disassembling them.later much of that was re-enforced by a police instructor in a ccw course who inspected my MKIV 70 ser. and gave me the litany i just relayed although i wasn't hammer down and loaded.sorry i do go on!hope i'm not necro-ing the thead


 

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