Not sure what to do with my Official Police
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Junior Member

    Member #
    31016
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    3
    Liked
    0 times

    Not sure what to do with my Official Police

    bought this bout 5 years ago. didn't really have time/money to shoot since then so Its kinda been sitting since then. Its a Colt Official Police in .22, dated to 1947. got it for a steal, but not without a price. The rifling is near-pristine and the action and timing is crisp. If cocked very lightly in single action mode, the cylinder is just a smidgen shy of full lockup, but from what I understand thats characteristic of the colt DAs. one of the chambers has a notch on the edge. functionally its perfect.

    Now the bad. the finish is maybe 60%, the cylinder 50% and what I can only describe as a splotch of complete loss of bluing on the side of the right topstrap. also some missing from the outside of the cylinder thought it could very well from being stored in a leather holster for a number of years. The front sight blade looks to be homemade or just horribly deteriorated by rust. It had a pin going lengthwise through the top of the blade that I drifted out trying to deciper what it was (this was before I cleaned it). At the end of the rear sight "groove" it looks like a piece of bar steel was either crudely welded or brazed onto the frame with an equally crude V cut down it distinctly right of center.

    coltwood grips, though it has the checkered trigger and hammer of the "pre-war" models but not the cylinder release. I chock that up to being made in the year they transitioned models. My dilemna is what to do with it. I would like to restore it. Obviously the collector value is trashed, but its still an out of production Colt. I didn't get it as an investment but even in current condition it would be worth a pretty penny by the time I'm old and grey. On the other hand, It deserves better than to be a safe queen in my opinion. The way I see it I can either restore it to the glory of it's factory configuration. Reblue, authentic parts, or I could tailor it to be the perfect plinker. Just not really sure what I should do or even my options seeing as how its an uncommon variant, 80 year-old gun long out of production with maybe less than a dozen qualified people to work on it on the planet. Fixing the sights is likely to be the most expensive as well as difficult job if it's even possible so thats my first step, along with getting some grips to shoot it with, if not be it's permanent set.

    I'll upload pics later. all I have right now is my crappy cel camera.

  2. #2
    Supporting Member
    Supporting Member

    Member #
    9537
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Great Smoky Mountains - East Tennessee
    Posts
    11,294
    Liked
    9252 times
    Pictures, indeed, will be a great help. But the condition you describe leads away from thinking of it as you mention, a safe queen. A restoration would destroy its originality but if that makes you happy, go for it. Really interested in seeing the photos!
    Tony

    “It's sad that governments are chiefed by the double tongues. There is iron in your words of death for all Comanche to see, and so there is iron in your words of life. No signed paper can hold the iron. It must come from men. The words of Ten Bears carry the same iron of life and death. It is good that warriors such as we meet in the struggle of life, or death ---- it shall be life.” - Ten Bears - “The Outlaw Josey Wales”

  3. #3
    Senior Member

    Member #
    30542
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    North Arkansas
    Posts
    399
    Liked
    430 times
    This is a case where "modernizing", making it a everyday use type gun is justified. Should you do a to factory condition restoration it still won't be worth nearly what you'd have to invest. Left as-is, it's just a rough old shooter. But put a nice modern finish on it, proper modern sights, and some cool wood/bone/antler etc grips and have a gun you'd be proud to be seen with. Still won't sell for total invested, but you could shoot it and let the heirs worry about lost dollars.

    Bob

  4. Remove Advertisements
    ColtForum.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Supporting Member
    Supporting Member

    Member #
    7355
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Ardmore, OK
    Posts
    5,397
    Liked
    10302 times
    From your description it's the kind of gun I would buy if cheap enuf for a DIY rework to be a respectable shooter. To pay a competent gunsmith to do the same seems to me to price up comparable to similar guns in good used condition. I've bought two for around $600 apiece in condition showing little use. One in good used condition around $450 plus or minus 50.

    This one I paid $660 for & sold the stags for $125 --

    It had a few rust specks on it. Seller said his mother bought it new in 1953 & probably never shot it.
    Last edited by rhmc24; 04-06-2016 at 05:56 AM.

  6. #5
    Senior Member

    Member #
    2624
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    SE Texas swamp
    Posts
    3,637
    Liked
    4425 times
    There are front sights for that gun listed on ebay right now. I would order some Oxpho-Blue from Brownells and blue it myself.
    My biggest fear is when I die my wife will sell my guns for what I told her they cost.

  7. #6
    Junior Member

    Member #
    31016
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    3
    Liked
    0 times
    Thanks. Very helpful. and Thanks A1A for the PM. It was my first and currently only handgun so I wanna keep it. Do you like the coltwood grips for shooting? I really don't like the stacking of the older colt DA so I mostly shoot it single action, but even with a single-action style hold on it I find the grips far too skinny and my hands are fairly small to begin with. I've been trying to find an old T-grip but have had no luck. can't bring myself to stick a pachmayr on it.

  8. #7
    Senior Member

    Member #
    8990
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    St. Augustine, FL
    Posts
    4,907
    Liked
    2338 times
    Quote Originally Posted by bando_red View Post
    Thanks. Very helpful. and Thanks A1A for the PM. It was my first and currently only handgun so I wanna keep it. Do you like the coltwood grips for shooting? I really don't like the stacking of the older colt DA so I mostly shoot it single action, but even with a single-action style hold on it I find the grips far too skinny and my hands are fairly small to begin with. I've been trying to find an old T-grip but have had no luck. can't bring myself to stick a pachmayr on it.
    Look on eBay for some Herrett's stocks.
    Ken
    "I like Colts and will die that way"

  9. #8
    Supporting Member
    Supporting Member

    Member #
    2451
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Indiana, USA
    Posts
    4,419
    Liked
    702 times
    I use a pachmayr grip adapter (3) and keep the stock grips. I will soon have a vintage 1954 official police barrel that I will sell you that only have a bit of bluing loss at the muzzle and a perfect front sight. You will need someone to instal the barrel. Let me know. I believe I have a spare grip adapter as well that I will sell for $12. Oops, I see your gun is a 22, my barrel is a 38.


 

Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-06-2016, 10:48 AM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-01-2014, 12:31 PM
  3. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 12-21-2013, 04:36 PM
  4. Replies: 11
    Last Post: 05-24-2013, 06:25 PM
  5. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 06-06-2012, 08:49 PM

Tags for this Thread

vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
We are not associated with Colt's Manufacturing LLC. We are an enthusiast site comprised of Colt Fans.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.3
Copyright © 2017 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.