Rust beginning on a pistol
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 38
Like Tree16Likes

Thread: Rust beginning on a pistol

  1. #21
    Supporting Member
    Supporting Member

    Member #
    27271
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Gerald, Missouri
    Posts
    751
    Liked
    1118 times
    Quote Originally Posted by r010159 View Post
    Thank you for all of your suggestions. I do not know why it is rusting. My other pistols do not have this problem. This is alarming. I am just going to have to regularly examine and maintain them. I will purchase copper wool. There is this cloth that is made up of copper and a cloth type of material. This should be very mild on the cylinder. So I will first try this one. I will get this handled. This is happening to one of my 1849s. I have two. One has a longer barrel than the other.
    When I saw your thread the first thing I did was to see if you lived in a high humidity area. I would imagine that the humidity is kind of low in Tucson. I live in Missouri and we are moderate to high humidity and I have not had any problems with rusting using WD40 and then Breakfree for a lot of years. I would be curious to know where the gun was stored. You have some good information as to removing the rust but I hope that you don’t have more in the future.
    ALSS likes this.

  2. #22
    Supporting Member
    Supporting Member

    Member #
    30344
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    461
    Liked
    102 times
    The 1849 was stored in my safe, in a zipped up rug. I am in the process of checking out my other firearms, holding my breath, hoping to find no rust. I have some expensive collectibles in my safe. I have one flintlock duelling pistol in fine condition that was made in 1770. The safe is a large, Liberty safe. I am going to have to use oil or wax to preserve all of them.
    Last edited by r010159; 06-08-2019 at 03:08 PM.
    I am a novice collector of Colt firearms. Recently, I have been focusing on antique firearms. Here is a link to some of my "gems":
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

  3. #23
    Senior Member

    Member #
    20175
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    9,621
    Liked
    11615 times
    4/0 steel wool will remove cold blue, so you do have to know what type blue you have. Otherwise 4/0 steel wool is good. Don't use brass wool doing rust bluing, as the brass rubs off on the steel and the bluing won't take.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    ColtForum.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #24
    Supporting Member
    Supporting Member

    Member #
    30344
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    461
    Liked
    102 times
    If this has been reblued, it may very well be cold blued. I understand cold blue can be rubbed off. So I need to be really careful. I have ordered copper wool. This may prove to be a better approach.
    I am a novice collector of Colt firearms. Recently, I have been focusing on antique firearms. Here is a link to some of my "gems":
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

  6. #25
    CNR
    CNR is offline
    Junior Member

    Member #
    36881
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    2
    Liked
    0 times

  7. #26
    Senior Member

    Member #
    12473
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,630
    Liked
    859 times
    I got some brass wool from homestead firearms and have never looked back. Now I NEVER use steel wool on blued finishes...there is just no reason too.

  8. #27
    Supporting Member
    Supporting Member

    Member #
    30344
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    461
    Liked
    102 times
    I used the above with coconut oil. There is a very small scratch when I used a cloth with attached small spots of copper, but this did not happen elsewhere. I need to keep adding oil. So I used the Big Frontier Meter Cleaner which worked well. The rust is coming off slowly, which is good. I am going to remove just the more obvious spots of rust.
    I am a novice collector of Colt firearms. Recently, I have been focusing on antique firearms. Here is a link to some of my "gems":
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

  9. #28
    Senior Member

    Member #
    20175
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    9,621
    Liked
    11615 times
    Quote Originally Posted by r010159 View Post
    The 1849 was stored in my safe, in a zipped up rug. I am in the process of checking out my other firearms, holding my breath, hoping to find no rust. I have some expensive collectibles in my safe. I have one flintlock duelling pistol in fine condition that was made in 1770. The safe is a large, Liberty safe. I am going to have to use oil or wax to preserve all of them.
    The zippered cases are not the best storage method. If any moisture at all exists on the gun or in the case it stays in the case and goes to the coolest spot, the gun.

  10. #29
    Senior Member

    Member #
    24329
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Four Seasons, Missouri
    Posts
    463
    Liked
    185 times
    I've used RB-17 for years to take care of fine surface rust
    DEFINITIONS:

    Cynic: A blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as they ought to be. Ambrose Bierce

  11. #30
    Senior Member

    Member #
    66711
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    913
    Liked
    1551 times
    Quote Originally Posted by r010159 View Post
    I should of used renaissance wax to preserve the finish. Now I see the beginnings of rust on my pistol. How can I take off this very light, spotty layer of rust? I am thinking of rubbing it off with a bit of FrogLube. There must be a better way.

    Update:

    Rubbing with FrogLube did not work, so I am trying CLP. I may need to use a very fine (finishing) steel wool.
    I am going to give you some advice about preventing rust. There are some air conditioning "experts" who won't understand or like this! If you live in a place where both heating and cooling are required during the seasons of the year, then buy auto-switchover thermostats. The ones I have bought are set to come on with cool air above 74F, and come on with heat below 71F. This prevents "dew" from accumulating on your gun steel during those wild swings in outside temperature.

    DO NOT BUY an auto-switchover thermostat for "programming". Some think that it is most desirable to allow your home to heat up or cool down while you are at work. This is a gun's worst enemy, and it will also run up your power bill. It runs up your power bill because everything within the outer walls are heating up (or cooling down). So when the cool air is allowed to resume, it has to cool down all of that mass (brick, walls, flooring, ceilings, furniture, books, etc).

    Actually when I installed my auto-switchover thermostats my power usage dropped about 10%. That is what air conditioning companies DO NOT want to hear! They want to sell programmable thermostats.


 
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
We are not associated with Colt's Manufacturing LLC. We are an enthusiast site comprised of Colt Fans.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.3
Copyright © 2019 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.