Rust beginning on a pistol
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    Rust beginning on a pistol

    I should of used renaissance wax to preserve the finish. Now I see the beginnings of rust on my pistol. How can I take off this very light, spotty layer of rust? I am thinking of rubbing it off with a bit of FrogLube. There must be a better way.

    Update:

    Rubbing with FrogLube did not work, so I am trying CLP. I may need to use a very fine (finishing) steel wool.
    Last edited by r010159; 06-06-2019 at 11:32 PM.
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    Not sure where on the firearm or what on the firearm is rusting, or even if its on blued, parkerized, nickle finish,... But I have had pretty good luck using a piece of hardwood cut straight at a sharp ninety degree angle, then douse the area with a light oil. and hold the wood at about a forty five degree angle, then rubbing towards the rust,changing to a fresh piece of wood very often as the rust is abrasive, and the pieces of rust now stuck in the wood will gouge the surface. Sorry if that description was a bit confusing, tried to make it as clear as possible. I've only used this on blued firearms by the way.
    colkid likes this.

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    Again, not sure of firearm, or base finish it has, but I know some people have used a very fine steel wool with light pressure and plenty of oil on blued finishes as well.

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    Excellent! I am going to continue to use an oil that also cleans, CLP. After a period of rest time after I spray it on, I will use the super-fine steel wool approach. This firearms has some remaining bluing. The rust is on the cylinder only. The CLP with a micro-mesh towel has worked, but only up to a point. Now comes the steel wool. After I am done cleaning it up, I will use a solution to take the oil away. I am not sure about which one. Isopropyl alcohol? Whiskey? Then I will use renaissance wax to preserve the finish.
    Last edited by r010159; 06-07-2019 at 02:19 AM.
    I am a novice collector of Colt firearms. Recently, I have been focusing on antique firearms. Here is a link to some of my "gems":
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    Do not use steel wool. Even the fine steel wool will scratch and remove finish along with the rust. You want this:

    Big 45 Frontier Metal Cleaner | Remove Rust from Gun Bluing and Clean Dirty Gun Bores Easy!

    Alternatively you can use the edge of a pure copper penny to remove individual rust spots.
    ---
    "Bridgeport?" said I, pointing.
    "Camelot," said he.

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    Electrolysis. I have seen this work very well. Purchasing a chemical like Big 45 is easier...I have just purchased it! $6 including shipping. Nice.
    Last edited by r010159; 06-07-2019 at 05:29 AM.
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    About your comment to remove oil: I understand that you mean the 'dirty oil', but keep in mind, that to keep the moisture away from the surface you should apply a light coat of oil on the parts, and wipe the gun down after you have handled it with bare fingers.

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    Exactly, any metal that is touched during handling needs to be wiped with a lightly oiled rag. Fingers have sweat that is an acid or base, that's what causes the rust. If you do this every time, you will not have rust. It's worked for hundreds of years.

    Once it's got surface rust, the finish is deteriorating to some extent. If you aren't careful trying to clean it, it will deteriorate more. I'd just put the CLP on it, and wipe if off with a terry cloth every day and see if that works. Metal wool is for experts, and will possibly make it worse.

    Also, what kind of gun? A 1950s Police Positive in 75% condition can't be hurt as much as a 99% Python.
    Last edited by azshot; 06-07-2019 at 10:18 AM.

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    Pay attention and don't use any steel wool - get a 'Frontier Metal Cleaner' pad and use some oil with it.
    oberon likes this.

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    Never use steel wool on projects like yours.
    Just don't do it.
    There are more wrecked finishes attributed misapplication of to steel wool than any other mechanical approach to rust problems. Certainly the causation of finish problems is the result of poor maintenance & neglect, but there is no need to compound the problem.
    There are tried & true methods for the removal of rust in any form, that will deal with the rust only, and leave the finish in whatever condition it was in.
    Use 100% copper wool. It has to be 100% copper. You can get it at any hardware store.
    Take a copper penny (it must be copper, like pre-'64), and cut it with snips. Use the pointy end of the curl that it makes as a super-duty pick/scraper. When it gets dull, just take another snip to freshen it up. It is way softer than the finish, and will not damage it in any way.
    Get some bamboo skewers and cut/whittle to fit any kind of crevice, pit, angled corner, etc. You get the idea.
    Get a phosphor-bronze brush. It is in the same category as 100% copper, damage-risk-wise.
    Keep the area you are working on clean, as in wipe up the mung, use a clean piece of copper wool, and fresh oil.
    If you take your time and don't rush, you will make your project as good as it can be.
    If you know somebody who has an ultrasonic cleaner, you can remove just about anything that doesn't belong there.
    I have employed these methods (and others) over several decades, and I have never wrecked a finish. In fact, I have effectively resurrected hardware that some folks would consider to be hopeless landfill.
    Just don't use steel wool.


 
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