My career with the colt official police
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Thread: My career with the colt official police

  1. #1
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    My career with the colt official police

    From my Junior High School years (1965-66) and through High School (1966-71), I dreamed of becoming a policeman. In those times, I read everything I could get my hands on concerning law enforcement. The school library, the public library were frequent "haunts" of mine and for that time period most of the info had been printed in the 1950's and early 60's. My ambition was to become a "beat cop", the foot patrol beat cop that earned the respect and appreciation of the public he served. I fanaticized about this job much as I went about doing the things a teenager did in the 60's. The subject of the policeman's service revolver was very limited in the resources I had available then. I can remember reading of the cop's .38, a four-inch barrel, medium frame size revolver, in blue steel and not much attention to specifics. Just part of the hardware a cop carried and only used to protect the life of others or himself. The very term, policeman, is no longer in vogue today. But it was in the 60's, and that was my goal. My firearms knowledge was limited to my Dad's 98K Mauser, his Luger P-08, and an Italian Carcano Rifle. My life's dream was realized in November 1971, when I was accepted into the PD as a in-training officer (cadet). The heavens had parted and I was on "cloud 9" as a police cadet. The PD-issue service revolver was the Smith & Wesson Model 10-5. A four-inch barrel, blue steel, cop six-shooter was this Model 10-5, used by many agencies in the 60's and 70's. A great "classic" now, but standard issue in 1971. There was another medium frame size cop .38, available in 1971 in most GS. That was the recently discontinued Colt Official Police. Many ex-PD owned Colt Official Police models were on the used gun shelves, under 70-dollars then. These were post war production contract Colts traded in on new shooting hardware. My Dad felt that his eldest son would be better protected by a Colt and the week before Christmas 1971, he purchased one and had Mom to wrap it up and place it under the Christmas tree. On Christmas Eve, the family opened presents and I was presented a Colt. A second-hand Official Police in four-inch barrel length and in blue steel finish. The factory walnut service stocks were still present with much "cop-wear" present on the right stock panel and the right side of the frame and barrel. A right-handed officer had packed this Colt in its prior job. The factory date was 1959, so I assumed that this OP had served in that PD from 59, or shortly after, unto early 1971 before being sold off as surplus. About 10 years service, I would guess. This Colts next stop would be somewhat longer though................say, 44+years now and still serving the same cop it did on Christmas Day 1971 unto today (Feb. 13, 2016). Down through the years, and several close, exciting calls, we have worked together as a team or partnership. A "silent" partner to some of my best and worst moments in LE. The kind of dark, unsure trail that all cops travel down nowadays.

    The term "policeman" is no longer used. Just Officer now and no .38 Service Revolvers anymore, minus one old holdout. A 44+year career has been done, an ambition from childhood fulfilled, thanks to GOD'S Mighty HAND and a Colt Official Police, one of the original tools of this cops career, is still here at the end of his dream job in LE. Thank you my friends. I hope you enjoy the post. I will post photos later on this subject matter.

    David

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    Great post. Congratulations on a fulfilling career-and a sidekick to be proud of. Thank you for your service.
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    Great story thank you for sharing. When I was boy my uncle was a police officer in Jacksonville, FL. He was the toughest coolest guy I knew. Thank you for your service.
    dabney likes this.

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  5. #4
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    Thank you for your service from one of your brother LE officers, happy you made it to the end.. No one really understands the job unless you've lived it.
    dabney likes this.
    " No Man Is Entitled To The Blessings Of Freedom Unless He Be Vigilant In It's Preservation"
    -General Douglas MacArthur-




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    Congrats on a Long and satisfying Career and Thank You For your service. I am happy to hear that your Colt served you so well in your journey and you will continue to show the New Ones just what can be done with that " Little Six Shot Revolver" every time you come and re qualify. All the Best .... Mike
    dabney likes this.

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    Always good to hear from you David. Thank you my friend.
    dabney likes this.
    Living a dream.
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  8. #7
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    In previous times, I was able to obtain several Official Police (OP) Models, of which I preferred the post-war versions due to the fixed sights. The fixed sights on the OP and post-war Police Positive Special (PPS) six-guns were absolutely super, in getting a quick target acquisition. But the "Real McCoy", original #869943 OP, of the above post, was "the" Colt for duty use. The "stacking" issue was "never an issue for me. I've heard that many times over the years, but it never phased, or compromised my shooting scores. Never! Just lack of proper range practice was the only issue that affected my shooting. I wanted to mention this (stacking) as it has been thrown around by a few as the reason they didn't like the trigger-action on a Python or Detective Special, the stacking at the end of the pull. Since I am a senior lawman, full of hard knock experience in shooting Colts, I will advance the thought that the "slight" stack is only a problem if you allow it to be. For me, I don't notice it, and would never use that as a reason for an off day at the range, in competition or qualification for mandate reasons. Thank you my friends and thanks to those who took the time to wish an old lawman well with this post. How thankful I am to be numbered amongst this wonderful group. It is truly an honor and privilege to be here!

    David
    Pappy1600 likes this.

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    I always enjoy your posts here and on other forums. Something rarely discussed is the importance of confidence in your duty weapon, no matter what it is. While most LE look at their duty guns as "simple tools" and many find their pen to be the most important piece of gear, many of us take our duty guns very seriously. Solid maintenance, constant practice, and a good understanding of capabilities is more important than "what" it is. I always found the officers that invested in their own guns and took care of them tended to be better shooters as well. A guy who knows his revolver inside and out and is well practiced with decades of repetition will likely suffer no issues to an officer with an issued polymer semi-automatic who only qualifies when they have to, never maintains the gun and generally don't like guns.
    Great stuff, keep it up.
    dabney and Doug.38PR like this.

  10. #9
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    Good story, Dabney.
    The Colt Official Police (and it's S&W M-10 counterpart) are good fundamental weapons. In my mind, they are just as valid today as they were 100 years ago for that very reason. I have been using my Colt Official Police (either my 1944 or my 1961) going on 12 years now as a concealed and open carry gun. I have seen other handguns in my collection. Good guns. Revolvers and Semi-Automatics. But it always comes back to the Colt Official Police (usually the 1961) sooner or later as the gun I am drawn to for carry.


 

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