Inherited SAA Colt. Want to learn about it
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  1. #1
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    Inherited SAA Colt. Want to learn about it

    I'm very interested in learning more about my SAA Colt .

    The serial number is in the 341### range. I believe this is a nickel finish (somewhat worn). The gun was my Great Grandfather's and I believe he carried it as a Peace Officer either in Alabama or Texas. My Grandmother told me that the grip was made from buffalo horns... but she always embellished her stories, so who knows.

    Anyhow. I'm looking at the Blue Book of Gun Values and am wondering what quality of finish the gun is in, if these are original "stag horn grips", and anything else anybody can tell me about it.

    I can probably produce some better pictures if need be.

    Thanks for any input available!

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    some more pictures.

  3. #3
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    Bigus_d, That's a beautiful old Colt & having been in your family & possibly carried by your Great Grandfather as a peace officer adds to the value to you. The only real information I can add is the serial # @ 341,000 is solidly in the smokeless era. Colt started warranting the SA for smokeless in 1900 at # 192,000. I'm sure more knowledgeable collectors will chime in shortly. I suggest you don't even consider selling it, but enjoy a family heirloom that has been passed down to you. Thanks for sharing. Frank
    U.S.A. " RIDE FOR THE BRAND OR LEAVE!"

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  5. #4
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    I agree with Frank.
    Hi

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    I show 1921 as the year it was made

    I agree that something passed down in the family needs to stay in the family if at all possible. Colt charges $100 to research a single action that old. It will tell who it was shipped to, when it was shipped, the original caliber, finish and barrel length but it may not tell what stocks were originally on the gun unless special ordered.
    Last edited by smkummer; 08-12-2009 at 05:56 PM.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigus_d View Post
    I'm very interested in learning more about my SAA Colt .

    The serial number is in the 341### range. I believe this is a nickel finish (somewhat worn). The gun was my Great Grandfather's and I believe he carried it as a Peace Officer either in Alabama or Texas. My Grandmother told me that the grip was made from buffalo horns... but she always embellished her stories, so who knows.

    Anyhow. I'm looking at the Blue Book of Gun Values and am wondering what quality of finish the gun is in, if these are original "stag horn grips", and anything else anybody can tell me about it.

    I can probably produce some better pictures if need be.

    Thanks for any input available!
    Gun was built in 1921. If nickel is original, I'd call it 80%. Grips are ivory. You NEED to spend a hundred bucks and get a Colt letter confirming configuration as shipped and who it was shipped to. Also need a letter signed by your grandmother documenting the history of the gun. Do some research on your Gr. Grandfather. Provenance to a peace officer always enhances the value. Nice gun, Good Luck!

  8. #7
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    Yes. I have no interest in trying to sell it. I really just want to know as much about it as possible.

    I see Colt offers a 'certification' of some sort for $100-200... is it worth it to get this (especially considering that I'm not looking to sell it). I mean, if this provides more detail about the gun, then I might be interested. It is just hard to tell what their service usually provides.

  9. #8
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    You have arguably the most collectable model pistol in the world, in a classic high grade configuration (ivory and nickle), in the favorite barrel length of gunfighters (4 3/4") documented as used by a law enforcement officer who is related to you, and with a personal provenence accociated with your family. You can't ask for anything more than that. Everything is perfect. And the gun is in great shape to boot! OH! DO NOT ATTEMPT TO CLEAN IT IN ANY WAY! Unless you shoot it of course then clean bore and chambers as usual without any ammonia laced stuff (it hurts the nickle). At least until you talk to an expert about that, and there's lots of them here.
    Last edited by Wyatt Burp; 08-12-2009 at 08:38 PM.

  10. #9
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    One thing I forgot. And you experts chime in here please. One piece grips at this vitage are two piece or a hidden screw if they're carved. One piece seems unusual. But the grips are vintage and seem to fit the gun perfect. Just thought I'd mention that.

  11. #10
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    One piece grips on a SAA are truly that - one piece. They are either carved from a single piece of wood or ivory or (more commonly for ivory) made from two pieces glued together with a wooden spacer (which is what I think Wyatt Burp was trying to describe). They are installed and removed by taking the gun's backstrap off separately from the triggerguard. No hidden screw or anything like that.

    Those ivories are very well aged. I could easily be convinced they are older than the gun. By themselves, they are worth a fair piece of coin.

    I'd have to have better pictures or the gun in hand, but I suspect that gun has been renickeled at some point. Very common with a gun carried often, especially those carried a lot by law officers. Again, though, I could be wrong. Pictures can make it hard to tell sometimes.

    The $100 for the Colt letter is money well spent, especially if it confirms the gun is in the original, shipped condition. I'd do it without blinking an eye if that was my gun. Frame the letter and display it with the gun as a family heirloom.

    Thanks for sharing!


 
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