is there a thread on factory Colt boxes compilation? used throughout the years
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Thread: is there a thread on factory Colt boxes compilation? used throughout the years

  1. #11
    hwb
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    Quote Originally Posted by guy sajer View Post
    Excellent idea for a sticky thread .
    I know it takes time and energy to make a compilation original boxes thread, hopefully one of a member here with a large collection can make this happen or someone has the time to search thru years of threads and combine them. I and many others would be really grateful. Thank you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hwb View Post
    I have searched here for a while with no luck.

    It would be nice to have a sample of all variation of original factory boxes Colt had used and its timeline. Great for references.


    For example, what does the original box and label looks like for a 1972 Trooper, 1971 Diamondback 1961 Python and 1965 Python?
    If you have a specific example to show, you will likely get a usable answer on originality....

    Cogitate for a bit , as to why CF members are reluctant, to contribute to a such a no-effort compilation...
    Colt snubbies rule.

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    A compilation of original boxes, labels, paperwork and accessories would be of great benefit to collectors and regrettably an easily accessible, master class tutorial for current and future fakers.

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    I concur: do not make a database on boxes. Paper is too easy to counterfeit, relative to steel and finishes, and wood. So you have to keep details of how to tell somewhat classified.

    The relationship between collectible values and information about the item is counter intuitive. It goes something like this:

    1. Items are relatively unknown. Information about them (internet forums) starts interest. Values slowly increase.
    2. Some inpatient or wealthy collectors buy fast, high, and often. Prices start to increase quickly.
    3. Fraud vendors see opportunity to cash in if they make counterfeits. They pick the easy to fake items first. Grips, screws, boxes. Things that the average skilled person can produce. Prices continue to increase as new collectors mistakenly buy fakes, reproductions. They assume they might "get lucky" and also make money, or that even a fake will add some value to their real item to other mistaken collectors.
    4. Expert collectors know how to tell fakes, newbies get burned. Prices start to destabilize.
    5. New collectors demand a "guide" to determine fakes. An expert vigilantly creates one outlining every "tell" and slightly wrong item on the current fakes. 2nd generation fakes are much better, much harder to detect. Prices start to fall.
    6. Prices fall to "pre boom" stage, because all collectors realize they cannot tell a real box from a fake one, artificially aged. Everyone realizes it's not really "rare" when there are hundreds of boxes, some real, some fake, on the market. Boxes go back to being worth about $25.

    End - this has happened in all fields of collectibles. Counterfeiters read the internet and books too.
    Last edited by azshot; 06-04-2019 at 05:52 AM.

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    I understand the concern but think the horses have already left the barn with regards to boxes .
    Gunbroker has all the box history you would need and the counterfeiters have been in mass production for years .
    Buickgsman likes this.
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    Please support Crimson Trace Grips , Mossberg and Beretta . They support our troops .

  7. #16
    hwb
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    Quote Originally Posted by 68python View Post
    If you have a specific example to show, you will likely get a usable answer on originality....

    Cogitate for a bit , as to why CF members are reluctant, to contribute to a such a no-effort compilation...
    Local gentlemen's family member have those for guns for sale and said to have original boxes, I just wanted to compare if real or not. He lives out on a farm and not computer friendly. I was hoping to get box examples here so when I drive out to see them I can make compare and possibly make offer on the spot as it's a bit of a drive distance wise.

  8. #17
    hwb
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Bowles View Post
    A compilation of original boxes, labels, paperwork and accessories would be of great benefit to collectors and regrettably an easily accessible, master class tutorial for current and future fakers.
    Quote Originally Posted by azshot View Post
    I concur: do not make a database on boxes. Paper is too easy to counterfeit, relative to steel and finishes, and wood. So you have to keep details of how to tell somewhat classified.

    The relationship between collectible values and information about the item is counter intuitive. It goes something like this:

    1. Items are relatively unknown. Information about them (internet forums) starts interest. Values slowly increase.
    2. Some inpatient or wealthy collectors buy fast, high, and often. Prices start to increase quickly.
    3. Fraud vendors see opportunity to cash in if they make counterfeits. They pick the easy to fake items first. Grips, screws, boxes. Things that the average skilled person can produce. Prices continue to increase as new collectors mistakenly buy fakes, reproductions. They assume they might "get lucky" and also make money, or that even a fake will add some value to their real item to other mistaken collectors.
    4. Expert collectors know how to tell fakes, newbies get burned. Prices start to destabilize.
    5. New collectors demand a "guide" to determine fakes. An expert vigilantly creates one outlining every "tell" and slightly wrong item on the current fakes. 2nd generation fakes are much better, much harder to detect. Prices start to fall.
    6. Prices fall to "pre boom" stage, because all collectors realize they cannot tell a real box from a fake one, artificially aged. Everyone realizes it's not really "rare" when there are hundreds of boxes, some real, some fake, on the market. Boxes go back to being worth about $25.

    End - this has happened in all fields of collectibles. Counterfeiters read the internet and books too.

    Yes everything can or try to be counterfeited. But if you have a original example to compare to, then isn't it up to the buyer to decide from that point?

    I also understand to some its "trade secrets" and does't wan to pass on or revel and at the end of the day . . . . its all about money and profit.


 
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