Colt 1914 Government Model .45 ACP British/Canadian
Results 1 to 7 of 7
Like Tree22Likes
  • 12 Post By varifleman
  • 1 Post By Swag01
  • 1 Post By JohnnyP
  • 1 Post By varifleman
  • 1 Post By deserttrans
  • 2 Post By JohnnyP
  • 4 Post By AlanD

Thread: Colt 1914 Government Model .45 ACP British/Canadian

  1. #1
    Senior Member

    Member #
    14300
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    190
    Liked
    195 times

    Colt 1914 Government Model .45 ACP British/Canadian

    Here for your perusal is Colt .45 ACP 1914 Government Model Pistol serial number C9591 which was 1 of 20 shipped to Remington Arms-UMC Company Bridgeport CT on October 5 1914. It saw service with Canada in WWI and Britain in WWII. The Canadian C broad arrow property mark is stamped on the magazine floor plate and British Birmingham commercial proofing on the slide and barrel. Remington Arms-UMC acted as purchasing agents for Britain and Canada during WWI.














    Last edited by varifleman; 02-10-2020 at 10:26 AM.
    arjay, ei8ht, coondawg and 9 others like this.

  2. #2
    Senior Member

    Member #
    62946
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    285
    Liked
    232 times
    Great looking gun. I like it!
    ei8ht likes this.

  3. #3
    Senior Member

    Member #
    20175
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    9,924
    Liked
    12328 times
    What is the British connection to WWII usage?
    ei8ht likes this.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    ColtForum.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Senior Member

    Member #
    14300
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    190
    Liked
    195 times
    The pistol has the 1955 Birmingham Nitro proofs on the frame and barrel which were in most cases added to the gun after WWII when it was sold as surplus by the Brits to dealers who had to have the guns proofed before they could be sold to the public. Most of the pistols I've observed with these BNP proofs were used by the Brits in WWII (especially Lend-Lease pistols) although the pistol could have have also seen WWI British service since the pistol was in the UK until at least the 1950s. The Brits especially the first few years of WWII were in great need of small arms especially after the Dunkirk in 1940 where the British Army abandoned most of its equipment and bought many small arms from the US and recycled/updated many WWI small arms.
    ei8ht likes this.

  6. #5
    Senior Member

    Member #
    11788
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    355
    Liked
    175 times
    Nice pistol and history!
    ei8ht likes this.
    Feedom ain't Free!

  7. #6
    Senior Member

    Member #
    20175
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    9,924
    Liked
    12328 times
    The Colt 1911A1 pistols that were Lend-Leased to Canada in WWII are most often found with post 1954 British commercial proofs. Some time after WWII a quantity of the pistols were sold to a British arms merchant that took them back to England, where they had to be commercially proofed before they could be sold. Then some of them came back to the U.S. through commercial channels.

    It is not uncommon to find post WWII manufactured U.S. M1 Rifles with post 1954 British commercial proofs. They were sold commercially after the Korean war and came back through England where they were proofed before sale.

    The pistols that were Lend-Leased to England that were released for sale naturally have British commercial proofs.
    Scott Gahimer and ei8ht like this.

  8. #7
    Member

    Member #
    4294
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sydney Australia
    Posts
    152
    Liked
    211 times
    Firstly, its a very nice pistol.
    A couple of points worth mentioning are that Remington Arms Co/UMC was never an agent for the UK for Colt handguns, only Smith & Wesson. In fact Wilkinson Sword were still importing S&W's concurrently with Remington until April 1915, at least.
    As far as I know Remington were not the agent for Colt for the Canadian government. Colt GM's were imported by companies such as J. Westley Allison & H.W. Brown. Other company's also imported into Canada such as Lewis Bros.
    It may be that the order for 20 pistols of which C9591 is part was for ammunition testing by Remington UMC or perhaps a small order that Remington were handling for a third party - but not Canada. The magazine is marked the same as pistols that were part of the serial number range that went to Canada, but I think it was not in your pistol when it made the trip.
    There is nothing to suggest that the pistol saw British service in either war. As stated in post #6 the proof marks are commercial and I believe applied after 1954/55. All that can be taken from the proof marks is that the pistol was in the UK and sold within the British guntrade from or after 1954/55.
    As an aside and hopefully without confusing the issue I have seen a WW1 vintage GM that was part of the Canadian government order that had the Released by British Government marking and a date in the early to mid 1950's. This is a marking normally seen on WW2 vintage Remington and Ithaca made M1911A1 pistols, but this bears no relevant to your pistol.
    Personally I would be happy to have a pistol from a small order to a well known U.S. gunmaker, rather than a pistol that was part of an order of 5,000. Just depends on how you look at things I guess.

    Regards
    AlanD


 

Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
We are not associated with Colt's Manufacturing LLC. We are an enthusiast site comprised of Colt Fans.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.3
Copyright © 2020 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.