Rusted bolt removal
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Thread: Rusted bolt removal

  1. #1
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    Rusted bolt removal

    I have enclosed a link to a product that I sure wish I knew about a few years ago. These came out in 2004. On utube a mechanic had already broken one bot on a flat head Ford restoration and did not want to use a torch. So he used this. I think it could work on firearm screws too.
    Pricey but they sure seem to work.
    https://youtu.be/GioUVyAXrks

  2. #2
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    Looks like a good tool for some applications. I’m not sure of an occasion for it’s use on a gun. Sorta like air tools. They are great for some applications but can get you in trouble if you don’t know what you are doing.
    MarkInTx likes this.

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    Melting candle wax into threads also helps relieve stubborn bolts and nuts.
    Colt
    NRA LIFE Member

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  5. #4
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    Looks like something to anneal brass.

  6. #5
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    Looks too large to be useful on firearms screws.

    The better option on most gun screws is soaking in Kroil.
    Or apply heat with a soldering iron with a pointed or flat tip.

    Of the options, Kroil seems to work best as a bolt and screw buster.
    Last edited by dfariswheel; 07-22-2019 at 11:51 AM.
    CHIZ likes this.

  7. #6
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    I read someplace that penetrating oil and the vibration from an engraving pencil will loosen up rusty gun screws. Have yet to try it myself (I have no rusty guns).

    FWIW, I remember my Dad (started his grease monkey career at a Ford Lincoln/Mercury dealer in the 40's) telling me what a PITA old Fords were to work on - always needed some kind of special tool and rusted V8 flathead head nuts.
    Last edited by paulo57509; 07-23-2019 at 01:49 PM.

  8. #7
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    In the airline industry we used a coarse valve grinding compound for screw extraction. It even worked on titanium hardware which was tough on tools and bits.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by trains2planes View Post
    In the airline industry we used a coarse valve grinding compound for screw extraction. It even worked on titanium hardware which was tough on tools and bits.
    If this shows up in duplicate think nothing of it as the first post disappeared.

    Craftsman (Sears) use to sell a fine abrasive suspended in oil, "Grip Doctor", to aid in removing stuck screws. Most screwdriver blades are ground to a wedge shape and want to back out of the screw slot as force is applied. The abrasive let the screwdriver blade grip the screw slot. Most gunsmith screwdrivers were ground to a parallel tip.

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    I bought an original Winchester 1873 in 38WCF made in 1889. The lever screw was buggered and froze in place. I tried all the penetrating oils, heat but it wasn't going to break loose. The screw was screwed beyond repair considering a replacement was available at a reasonable price. I finally resorted to using an impact driver. It didn't respond to just a tap. I had to wack it pretty hard. I used the impact driver for about a turn before a regular screw driver would turn it.


 

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