What is the appropriate tool to remove the V spring?
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  1. #1
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    Question What is the appropriate tool to remove the V spring?

    I've completely taken the action apart on an old V spring action gun, cleaned and reassembled, carefully and with a lot of sweat but I got it done.

    A gun I posted about in the Colt revolver forum could use a breakdown and cleanup as pointed out by someone. I knew this but the last complete breakdown I did made me not want to do it again for a while. The hardest part to me was getting the V spring compressed and out without damaging it. I used some needle nose pliers with some tape over the notched surface to prevent scratching the spring but it was hairy. Is there a better tool for this job or something someone can recommend?

  2. #2
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    there are V-spring compressors (look at Brownell's) but for all the Colt's I've had, I use my fingers (pain, I know, but beats breaking the spring or dinging it, which will lead to a broken spring)

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by nsege View Post
    there are V-spring compressors (look at Brownell's) but for all the Colt's I've had, I use my fingers (pain, I know, but beats breaking the spring or dinging it, which will lead to a broken spring)
    +1

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    Open-end ignition wrench.

  6. #5
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    I worked mostly with post-war stamped "vee" springs and I used my fingers to slip the spring out by allowing the lower leg to move out off the rebound, then unhooked the upper leg.
    This sometimes works with pre-war milled springs but you have to be careful with those.
    The "D" frames were more difficult and I usually used smooth jaw needle nose jeweler's pliers for them.

    I once made a universal spring clamp device using a pair of jeweler's parallel Sargent brand pliers.
    I filed the ends of the jaws to a thin shape that would slide under the lower leg of the vee spring when it was uncocked.
    I drilled sthe stamped handles and put in a long bolt and wingnut arrangement so I could clamp the spring.

    It worked, but it was faster using my fingers or plain smooth jaw pliers.

    You could make a "C" shaped spring clamp that just slides over the spring when it's cocked, but there's usually not enough clearance under the lower leg.

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    Parallel pliers work on most larger frames: https://www.amazon.com/Mazbot-Smooth...BVYSJDMB9VTNVZ . The jaws are a bit too fat for the smaller frames, but like dfariswheel said you can grind them down for clearance.

    Most of the times you don't need a special tool, you can just flip the spring out starting at the bottom bend. Some springs can't be flipped out because they're too tight around the stirrup (common on older V-spring guns), and on those you can compress the spring and swing the stirrup forward and out of the way. You can also make your own improvised tool by wrapping a plastic tie or a piece of steel wire tightly around the bottom of the spring, then you slide it forward to compress it.

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    Gun repair and restoration

  8. #7
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    Battery pliers work just fine. Check Amazon or Home Depot. A tab of duct tape over the jaws will help protect the spring.

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    Try the S&W wood wedge if you have their armorers kit. It will work. However, as has been stated fingers work just fine. The springs aren't that stout and as you depress the top bump the pistol slightly and the connector will bounce out of the way. The only Colts that I worked on as an armorer were the Pythons we were issued in the late 60's and 70's. It works fine with them.
    The reason I carry a .45 is, Colt Don't make a .46

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    Thanks all, good info.


 

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