1911 trigger pull too heavy.
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Thread: 1911 trigger pull too heavy.

  1. #11
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    Thanks all for the respected suggestions. I will try what I can of them. If I don't get the pull weight down I will just leave it as it is. It still will function. Regards, keith

  2. #12
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    As a Colt certified armorer myself and someone who operated a full and part time shop building 1911's for many years, I would take that "book" and throw it in the nearest round file. First, sears and hammers are hardened all the way through. They are not case hardened which is what happens when the surface only is hardened. You may stone both the sear and hammer. One should use stones that are absolutely square on the edges in order to insure that the surfaces are squared and the angles maintained. Most porfessionals use these kind of special stones only for trigger work and they keep them both clean an maintain the integrity of the edges. You also need a total flat surface to work on sears and hammers....most use a flat small pane of glass for that purpose. A jig for sears is very helpful but not required. Tom Wilson used to make special jigs, some of which are now made and sold by Brownells for the purpose. Tom Wilson was a US Air Force armorer at Lackland AFB in San Antonio for the Air Force competition unit. After he retired he was in the business of 1911 competition guns and made tools. He then quit, sold out and went to Arkansas to build Fire Engines. One thing that is know to smiths is that the sear spring has a great deal to do with felt "weight". You can bend the center prong back to reduce weight...a little at a time or bend it forward to increase weight. The left prong can be used to fine tune the pull for about 1/2 lb or so. The right prong functions only on the grip safety and shouldn't be bent. This might be something you might try.

    For competition the National match rules required a 4lb minimum for Hardball and 3.5lb minimum for center fire on 1911 pistols. All triggers were weighed at Camp Perry matches to insure that they met the rule. Spring pull gauges are not very accurate. Most professionals use actual steel weights that are calibrated and hang them on the trigger using a heavier center hanger that will allow the weight itself to activate the pull. Weights can be added or removed from the center hanger till the real pull is established. This type of weights can be purchased from many sources including Brownells.
    The reason I carry a .45 is, Colt Don't make a .46

  3. #13
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    Just get a prepped , drop-in fire control set from Wilson , EGW , or any of the other top names in the biz.
    "One does not sell Colts , one buys Colts! "

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  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkk41 View Post
    Just get a prepped , drop-in fire control set from Wilson , EGW , or any of the other top names in the biz.
    I had the Brownell's / Marvel Hammer and Sear Jig but basically gave up on it.
    Using a quality toll makers vise a drill rod the same diameter as the hammer pin you can position the hammer and using shims (feeler gages) you have better control of stoning too much off of the hammer hooks. The Jig being aluminum doesn't hold up that well, the guide rocked too much and if polishing the sear flats you are also stoning away the hammer hooks.

    But yes I've used the Cylinder & Slide retro Classic spur hammer, but put in my .38 Super the Wilson Combat Bullet Proof hammer sear and disconnector. I ended up going to a 21# hammer spring and used the Colt sear spring. The trigger pull was fine just a bit heave with the Bullet Proof sear spring and I didn't feel the need to be bending things.
    Ken
    "I like Colts and will die that way"

  6. #15
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    I did a couple of swipes with a stone on the hammer and sear. (I could catch a "ridge" with my finger nail on the hammer notch). Not having a jig or proper equipment I did not stone enough to alter anything, just tried to lessen the burr. Also bent the center spring about a 1/16 from where it was originally and reassembled. The pull is now somewhat better, but still seems heavy and will not trip with 7 1/2 pounds weight. All that said and done it will now stay where it is since it will not be a shooter anyway. I will take it out and run a few mags through it just to do so. Re-did the safety checks and all is well. Thanks for all the help. keith


 
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