1911 trigger pull too heavy.
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    1911 trigger pull too heavy.

    A 1911 with a trigger pull force greater than 8 pounds. I have several sears and tried them to no avail. I do not have another hammer to try. "Book" says no stoning allowed and fix is using different sear-hammer combos. Should I invest in another hammer and maybe still have a problem? Or, is there another way? Thanks.

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    Hmmmm. Mainspring possible but not likely. Could also be the hammer, or the trigger/sear/disconnector spring. Will take some fiddling, but you might leave the sear out and see how stout the spring is when returning only the trigger. Then add sear and see the difference. Easy to tweak the three-fingered spring, but it takes tiny bits of tweaking and trial and error. Midway has good "tuner" reduced power trigger/sear/disconnector springs for 6.95 to $8.00 or so.

    There are hammer/sear combos available that will not break the bank. To mess around with, a couple months back, I picked up an RIA keyhole hammer with strut, sear and disconnector for $15 plus S&H. At that price, they can either be smoothed up, used as is or tossed. Current "Sale" price at AdvancedTactical is 29.99.

    Lotsa tips on the 1911 forums, but all say to keep trigger at 4lbs or greater. Still, that's half of what you have and will feel great.
    Last edited by po18guy; 02-05-2020 at 12:53 AM.
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    I have a 1911 Gunsmith dvd if you’d like.
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    No clue as to what 'book' you're referring to, but judicious stoning (and keeping angles squared) is how a good trigger pull happens, and how various gunsmiths and AMU armorers got the poundage needed for a crisp trigger.
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    When you refer to "A 1911 with a trigger pull force greater then 8 pounds"
    What Model 1911?
    Unless the hammer hooks are excessively long, or the sear tip angle is wrong, the sear spring is the main component to check.

    I put a Wilson Combat Bullet Proof Hammer and Sear in a Colt .38 Super and to get a decent trigger pull I had to reuse the Colt sear spring. Yes I could have bent this or that on the Bullet Proof sear spring but the Colt sear spring did what I wanted. but I also put a 21 pound hammer spring in my pistol. Colt hammer spring is 23#.
    The parts I used required no stoning or polishing but this is also a way to get a smooth trigger pull.

    So are we dealing with a current production Colt or ?
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    I believe the sear spring is the problem,also. Instead of trying to bend it( especially if you do not know how to tweak it) just get a new one and install it. It’s a relatively cheap part. Your post doesn’t indicate what 1911 you are trying to repair. I’ve been working my own Colt 1911 types for almost 50 years. My present Gold Cup and Ace have 3-3 1/2# triggers that are completely safe,without EVER having the hammer follow the slide. You may need to seek the services of someone who specializes in 1911 work because 8# is not the norm. Pete
    Last edited by sturmgewehr; 02-05-2020 at 03:34 AM.
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    Question

    Sorry about my details; I should have been more specific. It is a 1916 commercial Government Model. The book I refereed to is actually copies of the "45 Pistol Safety checks" from another forum and in those safety checks when trigger pull is tested the author refers to "G.I. Technical Manuals" demanding the only way to safely set trigger pull is with the testing of different hammer-sear combos. The reason being the surfaces of the sear-hammer are hardened and stoning them will leave unhardened mating surfaces which will gouge on operation. That is basically what this literature is telling me. As far as 1911 vs Gov't Model, it is just easier to use the 1911 term as all will know what you are talking about. Oh, I do have a new main spring and that also made no notable difference. Testing pull: I used my digital electronic Postal Scale which measures .1 ounces and compiled 7 pounds of weight. I then fastened that weight to a string looped through the trigger guard and hoisted the gun vertically and it would not break. Before I tested the weight I knew it was very hard to pull. I checked a prewar 38 super and it was very light compared. Checked a postwar Gov't model and it was heavier but still not nearly as heavy as the one I am working on. So that is where I am at. I think next I will do as suggested and check the pull without the sear in place. I will also use a magnifier glass and check the hammer notches to see if they are smooth. I did check with magazine in and magazine out and that too made no difference. I am an amateur with working on the 1911/Gov't Models so all of this is a learning experience. Thanks again.

    Edit: I want to keep this pistol with Colt parts and not go to after market. It is not a shooter; to me it is a collectible to be kept as original as possible. However, I still would like it to be in proper operating condition. The reason I mentioned 1911 is those parts would be OK in the pistol.
    Last edited by hwjhfs; 02-05-2020 at 05:45 AM.

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    I'm not sure what the benefit is of improving the trigger pull on a 1916 vintage Government Model.
    The problem might be that someone has already tried to improve the trigger pull and achieved negative results.
    I do not know what the original spec. would have been.

    I would suggest buying a Colt sear spring the type with cutout in the sear and disconnector finger. Keep the original(?) parts if in fact original.
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    Detail-strip it.

    Now, look at the hammer hooks and the sear for any burring.

    Stone away any burrs - keeping the original angles true - oil and reassemble and try.

    There's no quick way, short of a drop-in sear and hammer, so be patient.

    Meanwhile, check the channels the sliding parts move in, and make sure there's no detritus, because while a .45 is robust, that doesn't mean that it can't get gummed up over the years.

    A 'good' triangular stone works well - Brownell's sells them.

    And, while you're cleaning what you can see (a round toothpick is your friend), be certain to clean out the mainspring housing too - little things like that matter, but none so much as a properly-stoned and smooth hammer/sear arrangement.

    Good Luck!
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    Quote Originally Posted by hwjhfs View Post
    Edit: I want to keep this pistol with Colt parts and not go to after market. It is not a shooter; to me it is a collectible to be kept as original as possible. However, I still would like it to be in proper operating condition. The reason I mentioned 1911 is those parts would be OK in the pistol.
    You can't have the cake and eat it too. Whatever you do to the pistol will take away from the originality of it, and in this case you will more than likely have to experiment with different sear springs and main springs. A good trigger job (ie: stoning the sear and the hammer) will also help, it won't do very much to the actual weight but it will feel much lighter. Changing the hammer and sear may work, but keep in mind that this advice was written with armorers in mind. Those armorers already had several hammers and sears on hand, but you have to buy them to find a set that lowers the weight. Could be one set but could just as well be ten, so it's a total crapshoot.
    hwjhfs likes this.

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