Some Of Us Also Like Old Spurs - Another Piece Of Essential Cowboy Equipment
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  1. #11
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    They’re up to the 7th edition of Old Cowboy Saddles and Spurs and I agree with Red, it’s a valuable reference work for collectors of many different objects.
    I’ve studiously avoided accumulating saddles and spurs as a result of being inundated with gun leather but I sure admire them. Thanks for posting.
    Regards,
    turnerriver

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by rednichols View Post
    Surely if you're a spurs fan, victorio, you have a copy of THE book on the topic for collectors: "Old Cowboy Saddles & Spurs". I have a copy (two editions actually) because it lists 6000 saddlemakers who were all of the West's gunleather makers, too. There's a separate section for the vintage spur makers and Hodge is one of them. States there your man J.S. Hodge was a blacksmith (vs a leathersmith) who was b. 1869 and d. 1953, and that he didn't mark his spurs (with his name).
    I do have the 6th edition of Old Cowboy Saddles & Spurs by Hutchins.


    Also like Cowboy Spurs & Their Makers by Pattie. She actually interviewed some of these makers and their families long ago.


    Another very interesting book with a chapter on spurs is Old West Antiques & Collectibles by Joe Goodson and others.
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  3. #13
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    I had the Pattie book and used it a lot in my spur collecting days.
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  5. #14
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    Some Of Us Also Like Old Spurs - Another Piece Of Essential Cowboy Equipment

    These were my grandfather R. A. Neumann’s spurs. When acquired a few years ago, the overlays were black with tarnish and the thick leather straps were rock hard. One of the straps was on backwards, so I definitely wanted to remove them for careful spur cleaning and re-installation. My method for softening them is still under evaluation, and it is a “new” concept, as far as I know. The straps are now pliable and of much lighter color than shown in these pictures.

    I will probably never know who made these spurs, but one thing noticed different is that the staples were silver soldered from the inside. That assured that they would never wiggle loose, as so many do. Those tarnished silver rings can be seen inside the heelbands in these pictures.

    One possibility is that my grandfather’s older brother, Albert Neumann, made these spurs. He had a gun and bicycle shop in Marlin, Texas late 1890’s to about 1903. A picture of Albert is also attached here. I suspect that all of those old guns on the back wall were taken in trade!
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  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by azshot View Post
    It's funny, when I moved out West my dad gave me his old Bona Allen roper saddle and several pair of spurs he used in the 1950s. I used the saddle a lot, but hardly ever needed the spurs, and seldom used them. They hang on a nail near my desk to remind me of my dad. I'm not sure many riders use spurs today, I'd sometimes ride with 30 or more horse and mule riders and did some roundups, no spurs.
    I was a mounted deputy for years, and we were required to wear spurs. I used them my entire life, as has my youngest daughter, who was a better horseman than me. She rode in every discipline; English, western, saddle seat and dressage. She roped and jumped too.

    I still have mine, and they too hang on the wall now, but for us, the slight touch of a rowel would be a communication to the horse that needed to perform a minute movement.
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfcoln View Post
    I was a mounted deputy for years, and we were required to wear spurs. I used them my entire life, as has my youngest daughter, who was a better horseman than me. She rode in every discipline; English, western, saddle seat and dressage. She roped and jumped too.

    I still have mine, and they too hang on the wall now, but for us, the slight touch of a rowel would be a communication to the horse that needed to perform a minute movement.
    So was I for a little over 5 yrs. my duty weapon was a 1959 SA 7 1/2 .44 spcl. I qualified w/ it w/a 295 out of 300.My oldest daughter that I lost to cancer 4 yrs. ago was a competitive horsewoman in gymkhana,cutting & match racing,when she went on vacation she loaded up her 2 1/4 horses & her blue heeler & rode on roundups on ranches owned by some of her friends,she was 55 when she left me.
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  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Martin View Post
    So was I for a little over 5 yrs. my duty weapon was a 1959 SA 7 1/2 .44 spcl. I qualified w/ it w/a 295 out of 300.My oldest daughter that I lost to cancer 4 yrs. ago was a competitive horsewoman in gymkhana,cutting & match racing,when she went on vacation she loaded up her 2 1/4 horses & her blue heeler & rode on roundups on ranches owned by some of her friends,she was 55 when she left me.
    So the blue heeler, aka Australian cattle dog, made it to USA, too :-).

    blue heeler.jpg

    So sorry to hear of your daughter's death. In two days' time we'll bury my wife's father here in Australia, though he had a much longer run before he 'fell off his perch' as this is called here.
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfcoln View Post
    I was a mounted deputy for years, and we were required to wear spurs. I used them my entire life, as has my youngest daughter, who was a better horseman than me. She rode in every discipline; English, western, saddle seat and dressage. She roped and jumped too.

    I still have mine, and they too hang on the wall now, but for us, the slight touch of a rowel would be a communication to the horse that needed to perform a minute movement.
    I ride mules, and though people have a false impression they are "stubborn", none of mine needed spurs to perform well. I did use spurs sometimes, on rough trails. I'm sure you know, for most riding, a well-trained horse or mule doesn't need spurs to encourage impulsion. The problem with spurs is both the animal and the human rider have to be very disciplined with them, and foot position and control is critical. Plenty of runaways and bucking are due to either being unfamilar with spurs. So I didn't mess with them. Squeeze the legs, bump with a calf or boot heel...that's all I need. But I'm just doing wilderness rides, trails, stream crossing, and elk hunting. Not any rodeo events, etc.
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  10. #19
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    Some Of Us Also Like Old Spurs - Another Piece Of Essential Cowboy Equipment

    These silver overlaid, engraved, and plated spurs are marked “McChesney” on the outer heelbands under the buttons. They are single mounted with simple 5-point rowels.

    John R. McChesney began making spurs and bits at Broken Bow, I.T. in 1887. In 1890 he moved to Gainesville, TX. By 1906 he issued his 1st catalog and also began marketing thru Justin Boot Company. In 1910 he moved to Paul’s Valley, Okla and continued production until his death Jan 8, 1928. Nocona Boot Company (Nocona, TX) bought McChesney’s company and continued making spurs 1929-33.
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  11. #20
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    Some Of Us Also Like Old Spurs - Another Piece Of Essential Cowboy Equipment

    Some old Chihuahua spurs. No maker's name. Bought long ago before new fakes were being sold in places like Nuevo Laredo.
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