Unusual Holster
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Thread: Unusual Holster

  1. #1
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    Unusual Holster

    The holster shown below was made by Roy's Leather Goods in Magnolia, Arkansas. Roy Baker is credited with developing the "Pancake Holster", and seems like another leather smith made a tribute holster to Roy a few years back.

    The holster shown was given to a gun shop owner in Magnolia when Roy closed down, and according to Mr. Baker was one from a 1970's contract with Barksdale Air Force Base in Bossier City, Louisiana. The odd thing is that it is either left handed, or meant to be worn butt forward as in pre WWI. According to the shop owner, Mr. Baker described it as being left handed.

    The holster was given to me around the 1980/90 time period, as well as I can remember.






  2. #2
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    JohnnyP great pictures of an unusual holster. I certainly have never seen one like it!! Thanks for posting!
    JohnnyP, SHOOTER13 and Ugly like this.

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    Do you think a snap holster would be rugged enough for a combat Unit Johnny?
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  5. #4
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    Nothing comes to mind why the snap wouldn't work. The Air Force had used similar snaps on quite a few of their holsters prior to this one.
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    In the Chick Gaylord book "Handgunners Guide" on page 132-34 you can see a USAF security policeman use a holster that looks real close to the one you were given. Slung on the right side at the waist it had a shoulder strap that goes over the left shoulder with a extension linking the holster to the strap, never saw that before. Not sure of the date of the book maybe early 60's.

    "Staff Sergeant Thomas B. Loughman USAF, assigned to armed forces police New York City, is the fastest man alive with the government model 45 ACP and GI Holster. He can grab his gun, jack a shell into the chamber, and fire a accurately place a shot faster than most men can draw and fire a double action revolver. His time for accomplishing this feat is around a quarter of a second."

    He used the side of the holster to catch the sight of the .45 and jack a round in the chamber. Photos in the book show the complete sequence.



    " Sergeant Loughman was gun shy at the beginning of his career and did not begin to develop his phenomenal speed and accuracy until after he was wounded. He practices a minimum of a half hour a day and is meticulous in the care and maintenance of his weapon. His weapon is the issue .45 that has been altered in no way. His holster is the regulation job with only the leather block removed."

    The book also shows him "Fan loading the .45 automatic" using the rear sight.
    Last edited by Ugly; 03-19-2020 at 10:08 AM.

  7. #6
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    Jeff Cooper demonstrated speed with a GI Model 1916 holster.
    He wiped the flap open with the right hand as he drew the gun, then operated the slide with his left during the draw.

    By the 1970's the military were beginning to notice that some people were left-handed.
    Bianchi introduced the first military holster designed to be used by the right or left hand as the Model M-66, designed no doubt by Red Nichols.
    Some military units, mostly security forces, bought them as non-official purchases.

    The above version of the Model 1916 was probably a local military order so they could equip critical Air Police with a usable holster that would still look like the standard Model 1916 as used by everyone else who was right-handed.
    By this time the military recognized that if there was a "situation" at the air base a left-handed security guard trying to get a 1911 out of a right hand holster and into action was a non-starter.

    I suspect that like other holster makers, Baker found the brass holster stud used on the Model 1916 was hard to find and relatively expensive.
    I would think that it was just expedient to use a readily available and quite usable standard Line 24 snap fastener instead of going to the expense and effort to source the brass studs, for what was probably a very short run of holsters.


 

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