Durability of Ivory and Pearl grips?
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
Like Tree15Likes

Thread: Durability of Ivory and Pearl grips?

  1. #1
    Senior Member

    Member #
    19063
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    West Central MO
    Posts
    642
    Liked
    661 times

    Durability of Ivory and Pearl grips?

    Do any of you with grips made of these two materials shoot your guns with them on or do you switch them out?

    I am wondering about the durability for every day use. I know we see pics all the time of old timers with similar grips in daily use.

    I would assume Ivory is probably the more durable of the two.
    Amat Victoria Curam

    Never buy a gun you'll have to make excuses for later

  2. #2
    Supporting Member
    Supporting Member

    Member #
    6494
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Twin Cities
    Posts
    369
    Liked
    658 times
    Ivory should give you no issues at all, however MOP is much more fragile. I remember back in the day when Eagle grips offered MOP that it was recommended for 'display' firearms and not everyday shooting purposes due to the fragile nature of the material.
    broknaxl likes this.

  3. #3
    Senior Member

    Member #
    21528
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    gettysburg, pa
    Posts
    2,860
    Liked
    2424 times
    I had a Colt SAA with ivory grips and never thought twice about shooting the gun. Then in a moment of weakness I sold the colt for something else.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    ColtForum.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    Supporting Member
    Supporting Member

    Member #
    29747
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    122
    Liked
    436 times
    I have four SAA revolvers and three 1911 pistols with ivory grips that I shoot frequently and are none the worse for wear. I've never owned any MOP grips so I can't comment on their longevity.
    oldCop likes this.
    "When in doubt, empty the magazine!"

  6. #5
    Senior Member

    Member #
    1906
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Desert Southwest
    Posts
    4,352
    Liked
    6238 times
    Not personal experience, but 40 years of looking at these grip types at gun shows has given me some evidence. Which do you see chipped and cracked the most? Not ivory or wood. It's mostly the old hard rubber grips, followed by pearl. And I suspect those are mostly damaged from dropping the gun onto a hard surface like a rock or pavement, not from shooting them.
    Last edited by azshot; 06-14-2019 at 12:32 PM.
    Hopalong likes this.

  7. #6
    Junior Member

    Member #
    4677
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    60
    Liked
    91 times
    I think most of the damage to pearl comes from being dropped or banged into something hard. I've not experienced any problems just shooting.
    Hopalong likes this.
    Where's the Kaboom? There was supposed to be an earth shattering Kaboom.

    Marvin the Martian

  8. #7
    Senior Member

    Member #
    23754
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    5,454
    Liked
    14515 times
    >Do any of you with grips made of these two materials shoot your guns with them on

    Yes, with both materials, I shot them both consistently until very recently

    >do you switch them out?

    never have but for the difficulty these days getting either and the $ spent I might think about it now. Haven't yet. Likely won't ivory but pearl I'd likely not shoot as quality pearl is almost impossible to find and more money than ivory these days

    >I am wondering about the durability for every day use.

    Ivory is very durable...it is just bone after all. But it shrinks over time. Dry climates make it worse. Which I suspect is why you saw so much pearl on old grips in the South West and Texas. Could also been that the owners liked thee added weight of pearl.

    >I know we see pics all the time of old timers with similar grips in daily use.

    Interesting pearl is/was more money but was the same price to get it carved.




    >I would assume Ivory is probably the more durable of the two.

    As others noted prior pearl is more brittle. Ivory is just nice bone. But there are a different in quality in pearl as well. Only pearl I have chipped was a SAA blowing up from a hot load or misaligned chamber. Totally destroyed the gun but only the corners of the pearl grips were chipped @ the frame. Grips were still useable. Not sure a pair of ivory would have faired any better. And pearl doesn't shrink. Pearl is noticeable heavier though than ivory.

    Nothing feels like ivory in hand.

  9. #8
    Junior Member

    Member #
    1384
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    75
    Liked
    27 times
    I've had experience with one set of pearls on a 1930s Police Positive Special. It had been in the family a long time and I knew it had been fired very little. The first time I fired it, a very thin sliver came off one grip in my hand. I found a set of wood stocks and replaced the pearls until selling this revolver.

  10. #9
    Supporting Member
    Supporting Member

    Member #
    22303
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    West Tennessee
    Posts
    1,520
    Liked
    2017 times
    Elephants spend decades using their tusks to fight each other, fend off enemies and uproot trees. It's tough stuff. I have ivory on a custom Ruger .500JRH, if that tells you anything. I only had an extra set made out of micarta in case there are any issues traveling with ivory.

    29aholic likes this.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

  11. #10
    Senior Member

    Member #
    19511
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    The Rolling Plains
    Posts
    1,282
    Liked
    1588 times
    I have 4 guns currently that have ivory on them that I shoot a lot. 1 45 Colt SAA, 2 45acp 1911s, and one python 357. I have also owned 2 others. As long as the grips are properly made and fit, you should have no issues. I had a 38 special officers model that had a poorly fit set of ivories on it but it was cheap. The poor fit caused stress on the screw and it cracked as a result. My uncle has an old family SAA that came from factory with ivories in 1905. It was carried by a great uncle as an everyday ranch gun for 45 years or so and the ivories are completely sound. I am buying a 32-20 SAA that I believe dates to the 1890s. The ivories on it aren't factory but they weren't put on long after it left colt. This pistol has lived a roughbit of a lifebut the ivories are still sound.

    As for drying out. Soak them in mineral oil every 12-18 months and they shouldn't have any trouble with shrinkage or drying out.


 
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
We are not associated with Colt's Manufacturing LLC. We are an enthusiast site comprised of Colt Fans.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.3
Copyright © 2019 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.