I never knew they made these for the GIs?
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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyP View Post
    WWI vintage with the "football" handle. They also made this with a one piece rod for barracks use.
    Seems like your kit has brass rods, while my friend's kit has steel rods. Do you know when this was changed?

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    Gun repair and restoration

  2. #12
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    I was issued a M1 Garand in USMC boot camp in 1961 and I never saw a cleaning rod kit like that one. Our rods were steel and the barracks rod had a t-shaped aluminum handle while the sectioned rod for the M1 butt stock had the handle described by BobWright above.

    - - Buckspen

  3. #13
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    During WWII, brass was in short supply, so steel was the substitute, then the standard.

    Aluminum and zinc-based metal was used for handles and buckles, too, but aluminum was critical soon.
    Colt-SL likes this.

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  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olle View Post
    Seems like your kit has brass rods, while my friend's kit has steel rods. Do you know when this was changed?
    I sure don't. As with some WWI equipment so much had been ordered until there was a surplus up into WWII. There were contracts for over 2 million Model 1911 pistols that never got into the production stage, but web gear like the magazine pockets for the 1911 were quick to produce. So many had been procured that unissued examples are still around 100 years later.

  6. #15
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    I see that case and rod were also used with the .30 machine guns. http://www.easy39th.com/files/Ordnan...L_A-5_1943.pdf

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buckspen View Post
    I was issued a M1 Garand in USMC boot camp in 1961 and I never saw a cleaning rod kit like that one. Our rods were steel and the barracks rod had a t-shaped aluminum handle while the sectioned rod for the M1 butt stock had the handle described by BobWright above.

    - - Buckspen
    I also remember the combination tool for the M-1. It was a three blade folding tool, on blade a screwdriver for the gas cylinder lock screw, one for disassembling the bolt, and a bronze chamber brush.

    Remember those?

    Bob Wright.

  8. #17
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    Here's mine, 1943, it has a 31" rod in three pieces but the case has four sections. I don't know if the rod, which is marked ETCO, is original to the case. I added the 45 pistol rod and pull through.

    P8260023.JPG

    P8260015.JPG

    KNO3

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobWright View Post
    I also remember the combination tool for the M-1. It was a three blade folding tool, on blade a screwdriver for the gas cylinder lock screw, one for disassembling the bolt, and a bronze chamber brush.

    Remember those?

    Bob Wright.
    I do! I probably still have one around here somewhere.

    - Buckspen

  10. #19
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    This was carried in the butt trap of the Model 1903 and Model 1917 Rifle. The nickel plated brass cleaning kit consisted of a brass pull through that was slotted for a patch and threaded for a cleaning brush. The other end had an oil reservoir. It has a leather pad on one end to prevent it rattling in the butt trap.

    There was also a spare parts container made of wood fitted to the butt trap that held a spare striker, extractor, and firing pin. Supposedly a spare parts container and a cleaning kit was issued to alternating rifles, but for some reason the spare parts container is rarely seen.

    During WWII the cleaning kit was changed to plastic and issued with the 1903 rifle and it's variations.


  11. #20
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    There were at least three combination tools for the M1 Rifle.
    One was the M10 Cleaning Rod Handle/Tool.

    One was the M3 Combination Tool that had a large split pin so a patch could be wrapped around it to clean the chamber.
    This was discontinued after it was found to damage the chamber if misused.

    The last was the M3-A1 Combination Tool that had a chamber brush. (Never wrap a patch around the brush, it ruins it and defeats the ability to clean a fouled chamber).

    Using the M10 Cleaning Rod Handle/Tool and one M1 Cleaning Rod section it's possible to....
    Tension the late type windage screw.
    Loosen/tighten the elevation screw so the elevation drum can be set.
    Disassemble and reassemble the bolt while it's out of the rifle.
    Disassemble and reassemble the bolt while it's in the rifle. (This is the easiest method).
    Remove and replace the gas cylinder lock screw.

    Using the M3 and M3-A1 Combination Tools it was possible to.....
    Clean the chamber.
    Extract a stuck case from the chamber.
    Tension the early and late type rear sight windage screw.
    Loosen/tighten the elevation screw.
    Disassemble and reassemble the bolt while it's out of the rifle.
    Disassemble and reassemble the bolt while it's in the rifle. (This is the easiest method).
    Remove and replace the gas cylinder lock screw.


 
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