'Sedgley' Springfield Sporter - and some questions ~
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  1. #41
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    FUBAR——- I would not for one second believe a government agency investigating itself when all that money was wasted and people injured or killed. Can anybody tell me if Springfield and Rock Island had their own forging departments?
    How about who made the steel? I think it was a little too convenient to blame the people who did the forging and the cartridge case. I have never heard of an 03-A3 that cracked. And I don’t believe that was because of the use of pyrometers. Something else changed, maybe the steel mill had inspectors when the steel was being made. Maybe the foremen in the forging department didn’t over heat the steel in an attempt to get the dies to last longer. Just my $0.02.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyP View Post
    The problem with Dr. Lyon's paper is that he used only the failures as recorded by Gen. Hatcher for his calculations. The military had been having a problem with the receiver failures, and in 1917 assigned Hatcher to investigate the cause. The failures had been occuring prior to this, and Hatcher only recorded those that he could personally document. The total number of receiver failures is not known.
    A lot of people poo-poo the thought that low numbered Springfields are dangerous....all I know is if I was shooting a 30-06 with my eyeball 2" behind the firing pin, even with safety glasses on, in the very corner of my mind I would be wondering about the safety of the receiver. Every time I pulled the trigger. Just not worth it to me. I shoot guns because I enjoy it....that little whisper every time I touch one off would take the enjoyment out of it. But then I think the same thing about shooting smokeless powder in antique rifles....

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe A. View Post
    This is one of many results I found when I searched "gun stock repair". The Stockfixrs - Professional Rifle and Shotgun Stock Repairs

    Joe
    Their 'phone Number is "Out of Service".

    Not sure what this means...I emailed them also, but, their Web site says "24 Months Wait time".

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  5. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe A. View Post
    Oyeboten, the link I provided above is just one of several I saw on the internet.

    Check out this one, also. https://artsgunshop.com/

    Iíve seen that shop mentioned favorably on Shotgun World. After viewing his website, I saw that they repair stocks other than Browning stocks. Iíve seen examples of his work at Shotgun World and where he would make a trashed Browning Superposed look factory new. He also has Utube videos.

    Iím really hoping you can get your rifle satisfactory repaired. Thatís a rifle anyone would be proud to own.

    Joe

    Thanks Joe!

    I'll get a-hold of them next Week sometime...see what they have to say!

  6. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by dandak View Post
    A lot of people poo-poo the thought that low numbered Springfields are dangerous....all I know is if I was shooting a 30-06 with my eyeball 2" behind the firing pin, even with safety glasses on, in the very corner of my mind I would be wondering about the safety of the receiver. Every time I pulled the trigger. Just not worth it to me. I shoot guns because I enjoy it....that little whisper every time I touch one off would take the enjoyment out of it. But then I think the same thing about shooting smokeless powder in antique rifles....
    I actually have "that" thought with ANY Bolt Action Rifle, no matter the make, model or vintage..! ( Maybe not so much with .22 Rim Fire, but even with those, the thought IS still there, only mildly...) Lol..!

    I suspect any of us with basic Engineering savvy more or less have to have that thought, peripherally...how could one not?

    Engineering wise, one realizes instantly, that IF the Bolt were to fly out the Back, it would be an unpleasant experience for the Shooter.


    Sedgley wise, I have found no mentions anywhere of any Receiver failures other than one example, where - if I am remembering it correctly - the Cartridge was understood to have produced over 100,000 PSI though I forget why, and the Rifle had a lot of Bubba History and a cluster of Bubba through-Holes on the Receiver top from successive efforts with bad Scope Mountings, and apparently the Receiver failed and split open somewhat. Bolt stayed in place though, far as I recall.

    I did not save the Link, and this was some time ago when I had read that. I can try finding it again with some 'googles' maybe.

    I would be very surprised if my Rifle even ever had more than a couple Boxes if that, of rounds put through it, but, who knows?

    Nothing about it suggests it was carried hardly at all, if at all, or fired much.

    Of course too, I can "Load my Own" and Load them to be a little more mild than Standard Loadings, if I wished.

    It is not as if I am going to be doing the 1000 Yard Iron Sight events or wishing to Hunt large Game, to need full power Loadings.
    Last edited by Oyeboten; 11-09-2019 at 05:23 PM.

  7. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by SamHamburger View Post
    FUBARĖĖ- Can anybody tell me if Springfield and Rock Island had their own forging departments?

    How about who made the steel? I think it was a little too convenient to blame the people who did the forging and the cartridge case. I have never heard of an 03-A3 that cracked. And I donít believe that was because of the use of pyrometers. Something else changed, maybe the steel mill had inspectors when the steel was being made. Maybe the foremen in the forging department didnít over heat the steel in an attempt to get the dies to last longer. Just my $0.02.
    The workmen in the forging departments at Springfield Armory and Rock Island Arsenal prided themselves on their skill in being able to determine the correct temperature of the receivers during the forging process simply by the color of the steel. Problem was that on cloudy days the steel appeared brighter than it did on bright sunny days. Pyrometers were put in and it was found that the forging temperature could vary by as much as 300 degrees using the eyeball method. These receivers were single heat treated, so if brittle they were brittle all the way through. The heat treatment method was changed to a double heat treat method where the receiver had a very hard surface, but was softer inside which made a very strong but smooth receiver.

    As to the 03-A3 receivers, the steel had been changed to a nickel steel in 1927 which was very strong but not as smooth/slick as the double heat treated receivers with the very hard surface. For this reason the riflemen of the day preferred the double heat treated receivers for their target rifles.

  8. #47
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    Everytime I have a rifle sent to my local dealer, I tell the seller to ship in a hard case. Even a $30.00 hard case gives great protection against damage.

  9. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buck Stinson View Post
    Everytime I have a rifle sent to my local dealer, I tell the seller to ship in a hard case. Even a $30.00 hard case gives great protection against damage.
    I had told Seller how I wanted it packed ( dismount Barreled action, deeply Mummify it and Stock individually in Bubble Wrap, extra padding on Barreled Action ends, tape both together, ) and I offered to pay extra for this, seller assured me they are old hands, been doing for years, never a problem, not their first Rodeo, etc.

    Hard Case would be fine also!

    And even dismounting Barreled Action from Stock, each Bubble wrapped individually, IN a Hard Case, would be fine.

    Not sure how I will play it next time I get a Long Arm on Gunbroker, other than to insist and to obtain a clear "YES we will do it just as you say!" as for how they WILL pack how I want, and then to call and follow up again in a few hours and again first thing in the morning, to make SURE..! Lol...

    Eeeeesh!

  10. #49
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    Back when I was a Marine midshipman in Auburn University's Navy/Marine Corps ROTC unit, my drill rifle was a '03A3. The front sight had been removed and the tip of the firing pin had been ground down. Since Springfields had replaceable firing pins, it wouldn't have taken much to get it back into firing condition. One of my fellow Marine middies was issued a '03 with the serial number under 5000. The barrel had been replaced during WW I.

    Unfortunately, a few years later, these drill rifles were taken up and had metal rods welded inside of the barrels.


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