Colt Archieve Prices
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    Colt Archieve Prices

    First, I'm not bitchin'. I'm a big believer that a company can charge whatever they want to charge for their product. No one is holding a gun to my head and forcing me to buy anything, including these letters. (Though I do sometimes wonder if a lower price might generate higher interest and sales volumes and therefore higher overall profits for this work, but, I digress)

    Does anyone know the actual reason Colt has the two different price schedules for each of the Revolver and Pistol categories. I could understand if the price increase was solely due to the older firearms requiring more hand searching such as in the Revolver section. Most of the revolvers in the higher priced category are older. But that really doesn't seem to be the same for the Pistol section. It's a real mix of older and newer model semi-autos in each of those price categories.

    It's not actually important that I know, I'm just sittin' here avoiding yard work and curious if anyone knows the actual Colt verified reasoning behind it.
    Archieve price list.JPG
    Last edited by Fortibus55; 11-12-2019 at 02:14 PM.
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    Fortuna Favet Fortibus

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    It seems pretty clear that the arms that would benefit most from a letter of confirmation cost more to letter.
    I realized this when I lettered a 1903 that turned out to be factory engraved. I was charged an additional $100.00 because it lettered as factory engraved. The long and short of it is the archives were purchased (smart move) and are now a seperate company. It's proprietary information and, for better or worse, we the collectors have made it a necessity.

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    It seems they don't need higher sales volume as it already takes 3 to 4 months to get a letter.
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    Basic economics, the cost of a service has nothing to do with its price, the price of a service is what someone is willing to pay for it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Bowles View Post
    It seems pretty clear that the arms that would benefit most from a letter of confirmation cost more to letter.
    I realized this when I lettered a 1903 that turned out to be factory engraved. I was charged an additional $100.00 because it lettered as factory engraved. The long and short of it is the archives were purchased (smart move) and are now a seperate company. It's proprietary information and, for better or worse, we the collectors have made it a necessity.
    Purchased by whom? If in private hands credibility could become a concern.
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    It does cost a bunch, but it does add value and provenance to the gun. I wish I could letter my Model 1862 conversion even at $300. I called and was ready to expedite etc. and gave them the info and Joe called back in less than 24 hrs and said they had nothing on my gun. Great service in my case, no cost at all. I have no history other than when it was born. And I love history ......damn!
    Cal38RF

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    Paying for a letter is like buying a scratch off ticket. I feel satisfied with cost of the service. It’s a lot to ask for but a 30 day turn around would make things more interesting. After 90 days I forgot I ordered it.

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    I’m getting ready to order a few letters for revolvers I think may reveal some interesting information. Not to anyone but me maybe, but having the letters certainly won’t hurt later on if I decide to sell. I did notice that there is a quantity discount. 10%, 15%, or 20% depending on how many you order. Looks like I’ll be ordering at least five.

    Tom

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    I think some guns are harder to research through the old ledgers than others is why the additional charge. If it was all about charging more money, the python would be in an upper tier. I think that’s proof there’s reasoning behind additional standard charges. Now with the engraved or provenance extra charges, this is imo, clearly a case of them getting a small piece of the pie. People complaint about standard letter prices doesn’t bother me, but when I see someone complaining, oh this 1957 python came back factory engraved and they charged me an extra $100!!! I’m like, what the *?*?! So you rather it came back not factory engraved and it not costed you an additional $100 LOL... Kinda like having a winning lottery ticket and complaining about the $1 they spent to get it. I never lettered anything unless it was a super desirable Colt and high condition until about 2 years ago I think it was. I lettered I believe virtually every colt I had because I saw that discount. That check could have bought a decent colt but it was money well spent.
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnh View Post
    Purchased by whom? If in private hands credibility could become a concern.
    “In private hands“ as opposed to what? Colt has never been a state-owned operation that I‘m aware of. And Colt Archive Properties still employs the same historians who access the same Colt archives; it was merely an organizational thing.
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