American Civil War Long Arms in Our Collections
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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by mentallapse View Post
    Colt 1861 contract musket. It is a .58 caliber and is finished in the white. Made in 1864.





    Now that is a thing of beauty! It's about as perfect as they come. Someone was smiling on you when you found that one!

    The Colt Special Model 1861 I had was dated 1862 and showed usage in the war. Probably Confederate usage at one point as it had corporal chevrons carved in the wrist of the stock with A.K. carved above them, or perhaps they were carved by the original Union man who bought it after the war. Either way such a thing would have brought severe punishment to a U.S. soldier while he and the arm were in service.

    Fantastic piece, mentallapse!
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by spacecoast1 View Post
    I've been wanting a Civil War Rifle to shoot for quite a while and recently picked up this 1864 Springfield (or 1863 Type II, whichever you prefer) from Dave Taylor in Ohio. The nipple is all beat up, so I still need to replace it, but hope to have this one up and running very soon.

    Attachment 676465Attachment 676467Attachment 676469
    The 1864 Springfield, the pinnacle of the riflemusket, and one should it have a decent bore will shoot with no guilt. A new stainless nipple can be had from Lodgewood, S&S, Regimental Quartermaster, etc. specify it's for an original. Maybe soak the area in Kroil and use a 1/4" open end wrench to try and get the old one out, a little careful work and they do come out. A machine shop with pin gauges can tell you the bore diameter, to get a good mold fit for shooting and a push through sizer. You're about to embark on a great journey with that riflemusket which may surprise you with it's accuracy. Keep me posted if you will.

  3. #33
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    The 1864 Springfield, the pinnacle of the riflemusket, and one should it have a decent bore will shoot with no guilt. A new stainless nipple can be had from Lodgewood, S&S, Regimental Quartermaster, etc. specify it's for an original. Maybe soak the area in Kroil and use a 1/4" open end wrench to try and get the old one out, a little careful work and they do come out. A machine shop with pin gauges can tell you the bore diameter, to get a good mold fit for shooting and a push through sizer. You're about to embark on a great journey with that riflemusket which may surprise you with it's accuracy. Keep me posted if you will.
    Thanks, I will definitely keep you posted. The shoulders of the nipple are eroded so much that I don't think I can grab anything with a wrench, so I will likely have to go with the drilling and EZ-out method if possible. I already bought a replacement "AMPCO/Beryllium" nipple from S&S with the 5/16"x24 thread, and I trust that is the correct part.

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    Capture.JPG
    Last edited by spacecoast1; 01-22-2020 at 01:35 PM.
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  5. #34
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    Wish I was more like the other posters of this thread and was a shooter like they are. I enjoy reading what each of you has posted. My enjoyment comes from seeing the quality of the workmanship that went into each of these historic arms. Here is a rare Philadelphia, Pennsylvania made J.H. Krider militia rifle made for the state of Pennsylvania in 1861. It is .58 caliber. Notice the lock is flush with the stock.


    It's Not What You Gather, But What You Scatter That Tells What Kind Of Life You Have Lived.

  6. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by spacecoast1 View Post
    Thanks, I will definitely keep you posted. The shoulders of the nipple are eroded so much that I don't think I can grab anything with a wrench, so I will likely have to go with the drilling and EZ-out method if possible. I already bought a replacement "AMPCO/Beryllium" nipple from S&S with the 5/16"x24 thread, and I trust that is the correct part.

    Product Detail

    Capture.JPG
    Yes, that's the correct size and thread for a U.S. musket. How is the bore in it?

  7. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by mentallapse View Post
    Wish I was more like the other posters of this thread and was a shooter like they are. I enjoy reading what each of you has posted. My enjoyment comes from seeing the quality of the workmanship that went into each of these historic arms. Here is a rare Philadelphia, Pennsylvania made J.H. Krider militia rifle made for the state of Pennsylvania in 1861. It is .58 caliber. Notice the lock is flush with the stock.


    That's one you don't see everyday. From what I'e seen of your collection, I don't believe I'd be shooting them either, they're way too fine to be shooting. Fouling would wipe off the metal easy enough, but I would be afraid of it embedding in the wood. Somebody has to bear the burden of caring for those few unfired mint examples that still exist, keep up the good work!

    There's plenty of shooter grade guns out there with decent bores if you get the itch to shoot one. They can be amazingly accurate and fun to shoot.
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  8. #37
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    Yes, that's the correct size and thread for a U.S. musket. How is the bore in it?
    Thanks for confirming that. I can't really get a great look at the bore because the barrel is so long and dark, but I ran some Hoppes and patches up and down and didn't get out all that much. I need to get some better .58 cal cleaning tools and mops. I hadn't thought about trying to remove the breech plug - do you recommend that? I am current soaking the breech and the nipple area in PB Blaster to try and free stuff up if possible.
    Last edited by spacecoast1; 01-23-2020 at 04:12 PM.
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  9. #38
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    A small pen light should slide down the bore easily for inspection. With a proper wrench and a padded vice breech plugs can easily and safely be removed, by proper wrench I mean a hardened 3/8x2x30" flat steel wrench with close tolerance to the shape of the plug tang. I don't have a picture of mine and don't remember where I bought it, but it would normally be a task for an armorer or gunsmith to insure proper realignment and not marring either plug or barrel. For general cleaning I use a .58 aluminum rod with a guide and a threaded female tip on the jag for brushes and a breech scraper. And get a worm, you'll probably loose a patch down the bore occasionally, they thread on your original rammer. Usually a few right hand twists with the worm and the patch can be drawn out with little effort.

  10. #39
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    As krag96 said having a bore light that slides down barrel is essential for after-cleaning inspection if you shoot a muzzleloader or need to inspect the bore on one. These are 2 that muzzleloader supply companies carry.


    bore light.pngbore light 2.jpg
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  11. #40
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    Thanks, I didn't know anyone was making lights just for this purpose. I've usually simply used the smallest pocket Maglite and slid it down the bore, probably wouldn't work with smaller calibers.


 
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