Tell me a "Colt Story" ...
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  1. #1
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    Tell me a "Colt Story" ...

    Tell me one of your favorite "Colt" stories. I'll start...

    So early in my gunsmithing career, I bought my first Colt. A Series 70 Combat Commander, a very nice one. Before I even fired it, I milled it for a Bo Mar rear sight (yeah I know, probably not the most appropriate use of a Bo Mar, but it was the '80's), installed a Gold Cup front sight, re-fit the barrel, and profiled the barrel for an exaggerated "series 70" shape for greater reliability. I then checkered the front strap, and installed a nice King Tappan trigger. Finally I topped it off with a Wilson beavertail grip safety. I had my first full custom 1911. Problem is...I hadn't shot it. Well, it REALLY didn't work worth a crap. Oh man, I spent SO many hours trying to get this pistol to work. I tried it all. I finally gave up and gave it to Yoda (our veteran gunsmith). He had been watching me struggle and he was a little perplexed as well. But he immediately dropped a chamber gauge into the barrel and it almost wouldn't go in. The chamber was cut undersized from the factory. At that point in my education, I would have NEVER figured that one out. Anyhow, that gun went the next 10,000 rounds without a single hitch.
    az_colt, 459459, MarkInTx and 7 others like this.

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    Life member of the local range and my boss at the time asked me to take him shooting. He had a model 19 Smith that he just loved and I had my six inch python I wanted to try some new hollow base wad cutters in. Set up a sand bag rest and loaded six of my Speer wad cutters in with my boss watching the target through my spotting scope. Pulled the trigger and he let out a whistle and said he ain't ever seen shooting like that. So instead of looking at the target at 25 yards I cranked off the rest of the cylinder.

    He was laughing his butt off and asked me how I managed a target like that. Turns out there was 12 holes in six shots, the swaged lead bullets pulled apart and gave me a two for one shot. Sigh, I didn't live that one down.

  3. #3
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    Bisley Haiku

    Old lady had Colt
    Nice Bisley- a forty four!
    She wanted to sell

    Duh!- Ugly Hombre
    Did not buy it- missed his chance
    Now he kicks himself!
    WVCOLT and billsr43 like this.

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  5. #4
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    Bought a Colt. Needed repair. Called customer service. Got a recording.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    68python, arjay, dkay62 and 3 others like this.

  6. #5
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    I had a bad break up with a supposed girlfriend the first year of college. I was home on a break and she sent a couple of biker friends to my house to retrieve some stuff I didn't have. I told them to split, and one of them pulled the door open. I stuck this in his face.



    Everything stopped. I rolled the hammer back, and his eyes watched those 255 grain slugs rotate. He backed off the porch, he and his buddy got on their scooters, and left.

    My parents weren't home and I didn't know what to do, so I called the cops (in case they did, which they didn't). One of the cops picked up the Colt and said, "Damn, good thing you didn't pull the trigger. We'd be picking up that boy's head in the street." They slapped me on the back and left.

    I did 33 years behind a badge and had many, many people at gunpoint, but this was my first, and my only Colt one.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homerfan View Post
    I had a bad break up with a supposed girlfriend the first year of college. I was home on a break and she sent a couple of biker friends to my house to retrieve some stuff I didn't have. I told them to split, and one of them pulled the door open. I stuck this in his face.



    Everything stopped. I rolled the hammer back, and his eyes watched those 255 grain slugs rotate. He backed off the porch, he and his buddy got on their scooters, and left.

    My parents weren't home and I didn't know what to do, so I called the cops (in case they did, which they didn't). One of the cops picked up the Colt and said, "Damn, good thing you didn't pull the trigger. We'd be picking up that boy's head in the street." They slapped me on the back and left.

    I did 33 years behind a badge and had many, many people at gunpoint, but this was my first, and my only Colt one.
    Love the chopped Pachmayr grip piece! I've got one similar on a custom .45lc snubbie. Works surprisingly well for being cut almost in half lengthwise.
    mentallapse and WVCOLT like this.

  8. #7
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    One of many Colt stories - Sometime around 2004 or early 2005, I ordered a custom Colt Gunsite CCO .45acp from their custom shop, my birthday being the serial number. Around May 05 it arrived. I took it to the range, fired it a bunch and shot a qualification or two. It rode around in an IWB Alessi holster for a few months. October 05 it barked at a bad guy. I'm still here to tell the story. It's the one on the right. The one on the left has its own stories for another day.
    COLT Duo Full.jpg
    Last edited by inspcalahan; 02-02-2020 at 04:57 PM.

  9. #8
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    Mine is a sad story with a somewhat happy ending. One summer day I was out working in my shop when a friend stopped by to go down to my range and do a little shooting. He asked if I had a plastic hammer he could borrow. He said he sometimes had to tap on the ejector to loosen the shells. I was into whatever it was that I was doing and did not pay much attention to him and gave him a small hammer. Well I got done doing what I was doing and decided to take a ride on the 4 wheeler to see how he was making out. When I got there he was putting away one of the guns. He said it was not working right. He kind of tried to stop me from seeing it but I persisted and found out why.

    It was a Colt Python with a 4 inch barrel. He had managed to bulge two of the chambers and spring the frame a little. We got to talking and he was shooting reloads. I know him well enough to know he has a bit of OCD and would have been very meticulous about loading the shells. He went home and pulled all the rest of the bullets and weighed the powder charges. They were all within reason of his intended load and below the max. So I asked another friend who is a more or less a walking encyclopedia of all things guns, history, and politics. I told him the load he was using and instantly we had our answer. He was using Red Dot with a 115 Jacketed hollow point. Sometime after the Python owner's reloading manual was printed a correction was made stating not to use red dot with the 115 jacketed bullet and not at all with the 41 magnum, inconsistent pressures could develop. They did and they bulged the chambers.

    I bought the gun from him as he was sickened by the sight of it from that point on. I bought a replacement cylinder off eBay and took the frame to a third friend's house who had a heavy duty manual press. I supported the frame and pressed the frame back into shape. The firing pin opening had dimpled a little and the side plate opening had a small gap at the top. The rear top of the frame had kind of moved up and to the right a very small amount. I can not remember exactly how but I supported the frame and put a punch on top of the firing pin hole and applied pressure. The frame went back into position leaving just a tiny gap that you have to know where to look to see it. I have test fired a cylinder of full house 357 Magnum loads through it and all is well. We never speak of this as it still irks him as to what he did.

    I guess the only lesson would to be to use an up to date manual when reloading. He should noticed that excessive force was needed to eject the shells I suppose. I have had shells stick a little when the loads are hot and the chambers a bit fouled. Just a tiny tap would release them. I still have the cylinder and ruined cases around here someplace. The Python sits in the safe like all my other guns and never gets fired. I am now a collector / accumulator and not much of a shooter. I did do a good bit of shooting many years ago.
    This all started with one gun!
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    I always wanted a Colt SAA just like Shane's and in 1984 I only owned a 5 1/2" blued .45. I bought a S&W .22 Kit Gun at the pawn shop for $189. I had fun with it but was notified by the pawn shop they needed it back because it had been stolen. but they gave me $450 credit in the store. So I chose the 4 3/4" nickel 2nd gen .357 they had in the case for a long time at that price. It had a lowered front sight and fast draw thinned trigger guard. I shot it some then traded straight across for the renickeled 1958 .45 pictured here. It was wearing different stags than these. Turns out it was worth less than the .357 but I didn't care. I had my Shane gun. And it only cost $189! Jim Martin rebuilt it a couple years back.



  11. #10
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    So many stories to tell! I have mentioned several elsewhere on this forum but one I have not told involves a Colt Anaconda. Back in the summer of 1998, I purchased a brand new 6" stainless Anaconda in .44 Magnum. I worked up a nice accurate load that was slightly below factory loads and yet was not abusive. I was using Universal Clays with a 240 grain JHP. I shot that gun for 8 years until one fateful day at the range I experienced one of those double ignition reloads on a light load (powder sits under the primer and ignites in back and front) blowing the cylinder and top strap off the gun. I wasn't hurt but shook up and upset to put it mildly! My confidence in my reloading took a major nosedive as this was my first 'incident' with reloads in 25 years of reloading.

    In 2006 I decided I needed to replace that Anaconda and purchased an identical one in .44 Magnum (shown below) sans box. I already had the box from the previous one so no big deal. The gun was not as nice as the other one but was in excellent condition. I tweaked the reload I used before using the same powder and bullet and the gun shot very well. I do most of my handgun shooting at an indoor range at 50 feet and have been doing so since the early 80's. A few years ago after a range session with my Anaconda, I had 5 reloads left and noticed the last two stalls, which are 50 yards, where empty. The range wasn't busy and they let me shoot at one of them. I had always been curious how accurate I could shoot the Anaconda at that range (50 yards) with my reloads and a two hand hold, standing. I put a 3" Shoot-N-See target on paper and ran it down all the way. Since my gun was sighted for 50 feet, I had to guess what my aiming point was at 150 feet. I loaded the gun, took a deep breath and thumbed the hammer back and squeezed the trigger...... When the smoke cleared, I looked and thought 'no way'. I ran the target back to me and that first shot was dead center in the bull! I thought it was time to quit while I was ahead and packed up. I sold the gun not long after that, but every time I think of that day brings a big smile to my face.

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