2020 colt python after 1,000 rounds
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  1. #11
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    I think i will get one now to see how its like, Thanks for the review.
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldcoltheart75 View Post
    I think i will get one now to see how its like, Thanks for the review.
    I wouldn’t shy away from one. I know I am rather strong in my belief the issue isn’t with the gun.

    Why? Because intermittent issues with mechanical systems are VERY rare. Mainly because the dimensions of the parts do not change (maybe a bit with extreme temp changes)

    To have in intermittent cylinder rotation means the contact between the hand and cylinder spur changes randomly. Obviously the dimensions of these parts do not change. There is Spring pressure that holds the hand in the forward position. Insufficient spring pressure? Maybe, but the metallurgy would be to blame there. That is certainly in the realm of possibility but I would think it would be more repeatable. If the issue was isolated to one spur on the cylinder the issue would be 1/6 of the trigger pulls. Also, note how the issue goes away when the ammo was removed from the gun? There is a clue there... also I can MAKE the gun act this way 100% of the time if I want. So because I can repeat this condition on demand I consider that another clue.

    As far as the transfer bar being the root cause of light primer strikes... maybe. But again, that would mean that the transfer bar alone was intermittently changing how it was interacting with the rest of the gun. So a metallic part with set dimensions was intermittently having issues with a specific brand of budget ammo? I would love to see the engineering report that states that and the manager that accepts it. A spring I could buy into. But again people that have this issue should try other brands to see if the issue is still present.

    All I am saying is I wouldn’t condemn a $1,500 gun because I choose to purchase the cheapest ammo available and then act surprised because I have unreliable ignition. It’s cheap range Ammo we shoot for fun and if you really start to take a closer look at it you can spot all kinds of issues with inconsistent bullet seating depth, crimping, and poor quality of case rims. Typically a gun digests this with no issues but not always.

    Real troubleshooting looks at all the variables involved. And if the problem can’t be duplicated then it’s not untypical to replace the components of the suspect system and hope for the best.

    All that being said, i encourage anyone that is tightening the side plate up to 1st remove it and take a few pics and post them. It would be interesting to see the difference in parts as the 2020Py evolves. We have already seen the DA spur change in just the 1st 2,000 units.
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  3. #13
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    Question

    I think the new Pythons are beauties and hope Colt resolves any issues. Reference suspicions of out of spec or somehow defective ammo, in owning I don't know how many S&Ws since the '60s, Rugers SA and DA, old style Trooper and 3 5 7 models, MK III Trooper,etc., I can't recall any light primer strike issues with factory .38 or .357 ammo, or my own reloads. With factory mainsprings, primer seating,etc. has not been an issue with any of the revolvers I mentioned. Dare I say it, that the light primer strikes might actually be an issue with the revolver?
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  5. #14
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    You executed a really nice review of your new Python! I will say mine has operated flawlessly BUT this sideplate issue being brought up. Interesting. Any double action revolver I purchase with a sideplate (which is all of them because I only buy Colt's and Smiths) gets "The Treatment". I remove the sideplate screws, degrease the holes and apply BLUE Loctite. This prevents the screws from working loose (which can happen with any of them) AND it seals the threads so they can't corrode over time making them impossible to remove should the need arise. I did that first-thing with my new Python. I don't give a damn if it is stainless. I have seen lubricants harden in small threads and it's been damn near impossible to remove the screw.

    Regardless however, my Python worked great. A buddy of mine bought a new Python and he had some issues. Light strikes, cylinder wouldn't rotate from time to time. He asked me to look at it before he sent it in. Everything looked fine. The sideplate screws were tight when I removed them! The only thing I could question was mainspring tension. The mainspring provides trigger tension by pressing against the rebound lever and hammer tension by hooking to the hammer link. I thought it may be a little lax. This is the legitimate way to adjust a V mainspring: Bend whatever side needing the tension outward in a curved manner. I followed through on the hammer side and the rebound lever side. I did not bend outward a lot, just enough to be noticeable. When I replaced the sideplate I used BLUE Loctite in the threads. He has not had a single malfunction since. Not one. Based on his revolver's function and measurements the mainspring was not adjusted with enough tension.
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  6. #15
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    This is a great review! also the posters are helpful....I will be buying a 4.25" later this year....wanting to let the dust settle a bit,and waiting for some shooting weather! looks like Colt is trying to get them right in all respects...Only question is,,,, is there a difference in the dimensions of the old classis grips and the new ones? seems to me like a set from OLLE would fix that!
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  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by BABYSITR View Post
    This is a great review! also the posters are helpful....I will be buying a 4.25" later this year....wanting to let the dust settle a bit,and waiting for some shooting weather! looks like Colt is trying to get them right in all respects...Only question is,,,, is there a difference in the dimensions of the old classis grips and the new ones? seems to me like a set from OLLE would fix that!
    Thank you! The 2020 grips are different, much thinner. Some people like the new grips others prefer the old and some prefer neither. The good news is the dimensions of the 2020 Python are the same to the classic Python so all Python factory grips and aftermarket are interchangeable which is a huge plus.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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  8. #17
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    Great review. For what it's worth and just anecdotal, I had a couple light primer strikes with Fiocchi ammo with my 1917 .45. I don't recall that with other ammo. This gun had some action work making it smoother than my Python so maybe it's because of that. I just happened to have a picture of it after shooting it with the Fiocchi ammo.


  9. #18
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    I think it's pretty well known that making the classic Colt V-spring lighter in pull can easily result in lack of reliable primer ignition. The method to modifying the V-spring to less pull weight is easy but also has resulted in broken mainsprings and much too light pull weight. Modifying the Colt V-spring is paradise for Bubba "gunsmiths" out there. Even the best gunsmiths have to be very careful.
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  10. #19
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    I'm sensing a theme here light primer strikes and Fiocchi ammo. I've shot Fiocchi ammo many times and can't recall a problem in my colt 38 super.

  11. #20
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    I've read many times that Fiocchi primers are harder than any in the industry. They have a steel underlayer or something, and many guns produce light primer strikes with Fiocchi. Do a google search, you will get pages of it from all types of guns....

    https://www.google.com/search?q=fioc...hrome&ie=UTF-8
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