2020 colt python after 1,000 rounds
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  1. #1
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    2020 colt python after 1,000 rounds

    Forum members,

    If you donít feel like reading this review, to summarize....ITS OKAY TO BUY THE NEW PYTHON. ITíS GREAT GUN AND THANK YOU COLT FOR FINALLY BRINGING IT BACK!!!!



    2020 COLT PYTHON

    First week in January of 2020 I went to gun store to buy ammo and started making conversation about the new release of the Colt Python with people at the store. The gun dealer told me his distributor promised to deliver him two 6Ē Pythons and if I put a $500 deposit down Iíd be on wait list for the 2nd one as he already had a deposit for the first. Without hesitation I plopped my card down and made a deposit. I expected it to arrive in several months, probably by the summer. Within one week of my deposit I received a call from gun shop to come by and pickup my new Python! I was super excited even though it was not in my budget to pay it off right then. I paid MSRP and have the new 2020 Python and really happy to own it. I even bought a set of vintage Colt Python grips to complete the look and feel of the original.

    Iíve now put well over 1,000 rounds through it and feel I have enough time with it to tell consumers thinking of buying it what the average joe thinks. Iím not an expert, so this report comes from a guy who just loves to shoot and own firearms. There are many on this group who Iím sure can speak in better technical terms about it...Having said that, Iíll do my best to describe my experience with a complete lack of proper terminology...so go easy on me as I try:

    OVER ALL FEEL 1979 v 2020

    I really love my 79í but Iíve always babied it because I paid a lot for it and because itís in such great shape Iíd hate to scratch it. I bought my 79í around 2012 I think (during the Walking Dead craze) so I paid a good chunk of change although not as much as what they go for now. The 20í Python balance, weight and feel is exactly the same to my 79í, especially if you slap a set of vintage grips on them. I think, however, the 20í may be about an ounce heavier than my 79í but not enough to notice a difference. Because the steel is different material than my 79í the 20í tends to get hotter after a lot of continuous rounds. So, It can be a little annoying for what itís worth.

    TRIGGER 1979 v 2020

    The only real difference is in the trigger and although itís different it still retains the essence of the Python trigger feel...if that makes sense. In short, I think the 20í double action pull is better than the 79í. The double action is smooth, not quite as ďbutteryĒ like the 79í, but smooth in that the pull is consistent all the way to the break whereas the double action pull on my 79í is ďbutteryĒ but gets tighter as you continue pulling back towards the end (stacks). The single action, however, is better on my 79í... but not by a lot. I think part of the reason why I like the single action better is because the hammer is longer and has more material to grab onto with your thumb, the tread surface is better to the touch than the serrations of the 20í. The trigger return is more responsive. It bounces back quicker than the 79í which ultimately helps in rapid fire. Overall, Although the trigger isnít exactly like my 79í it does seem durable and in some ways improved.

    ACCURACY

    I shot my 79í next to my 20í at paper targets to compare groups. In short, they both shoot great but I was able to achieve tighter groups with my new Python over my 79í...no BS. Iím more accurate with my 20í...donít know why...it is what it is.

    NEGATIVES

    Light primer strikes

    To be completely transparent, I will encounter an occasional light primer strike. Iíd say it occurs one or two times out of a box of 50 rounds. So far all Iíve used 357 Fiocchi and Ńguila 38 special because I have a lot of it. Itís happened to both brands of ammunition so I donít think itís an ammo brand issue. When a light primer strike occurs I simply put the bullet aside and load it into my lever action and it fires. At home I did open the cylinder of both the 79í and my 20í and noticed the firing pin on my 79í protrudes all the way out whereas my 20í does not come all the way out. If I push the transfer bar with my finger I can get the firing pin to come out all the way. I think it has something to do with the new transfer bar system. The hammer simply does not hit the transfer bar with enough energy and it may just be the way the hammer makes contact with the transfer bar.

    1979 firing pin protrudes further out


    2020 firing pin does not protrude out as far


    Cylinder Rotation

    Thereís been a lot of bashing going around on the internet about this issue, most notably Hickok45's video and Golden Web, and I can only speak to my gun. After about 200 rounds through it started to lock up and the cylinder stopped turning. I thought to myself, oh no, I got a lemon too!!!!...but after careful inspection I discovered the problem with my gun was due to a loose side plate. Basically the internals are held in by the side plate and when it rattles loose it can cause the internals to get a little wonky. Itís hard to detect because it looked like it was sitting flush but after removing my grips, I noticed the back screw underneath the grip was backed out causing the side plate to vibrate loose. The side plate probably moves while shooting the gun which affects the internals. In my case, the side plate lifted up slightly causing my cylinder latch to move forward exposing a little plastic sleeve behind it. If the latch moves out of place i believe it somehow causes the hand to become misaligned with the star on the cylinder because the hand rests directly behind the latch/side plate. I'M NOT A GUNSMITH but since Iíve torqued down both of the side plate screws (front and back) with a little blue lock tight Iím 100% certain I resolved the problem because Iíve been shooting it hard ever since, well over 1,000+ rounds now, and have not experienced cylinder rotation issues to date.

    Cylinder Latch vibrates forward due to a loose side plate. Tighten your side plates, especially back screw behind the grips!!!!


    Customer Service

    After I initially began experiencing these issues I called Colts customer service multiple times and after two or three days I finally got through. A guy named Steven Potvin gave me an RMA label and asked me to ship it to them and TAT would take approximately 4 to 6 weeks. He doesnít speak much to the issues but instead takes down your complaints and emails you a shipping label. After resolving my side plate issue Iíve opted to keep my gun and keep shooting it until things settle down over there because thereís no telling how long Iíd be without it and the light primer strike issue is so intermittent and infrequent that I donít have the desire to part with it for the time being. I believe Steven Potvin is the ONLY guy dealing in customer service which is disappointing for a major gun manufacturer.

    OVERALL

    Despite the negatives I think itís a great gun and I have no regrets buying it. Iím enjoying it and continue to shoot it. I finally have Rick Grimes gun, Itís dirty as hell right now and canít wait to shoot it again.







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    Last edited by Spurbitten; 02-12-2020 at 03:00 PM.

  2. #2
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    I had my first "light strike" using the same .357 Fiocchi ammo as you. However, instead of taking the cartridge out, I re-cycled it and fired it with the Python. The round went off on the second try. I compared that round with all the other rounds I had fired and the primer strike was noticeably different. On the left is a normal strike and on the right is the light strike. I'm not sure if it came up like that because of the explosion, or if something was wrong with the primer.

    20200208_162428.jpg
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    Thanks so much for the great report. In Hickok's shoot around video last Sunday, he also pointed to the side plate issue that Colt brought up to him at SHOT. Your light primer strikes with Fiocchi ammo is a major bummer as that is my primary range ammo.
    Spurbitten likes this.

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    2020 colt python after 1,000 rounds

    Quote Originally Posted by angrybeaver View Post
    I had my first "light strike" using the same .357 Fiocchi ammo as you. However, instead of taking the cartridge out, I re-cycled it and fired it with the Python. The round went off on the second try. I compared that round with all the other rounds I had fired and the primer strike was noticeably different. On the left is a normal strike and on the right is the light strike. I'm not sure if it came up like that because of the explosion, or if something was wrong with the primer.

    20200208_162428.jpg
    Itís not an issue with the primer, my lever action knocks em out of the park on the second try...Itís my opinion the firing pin does not protrude all the way out consistently as it should. The hammer hits the transfer bar but occasionally does not produce enough force to get that pin all the way out. The transfer bar system is a new design to the Colt Python. The old design does not work this way as I compared the two. If you open your cylinder and dry fire your gun youíll notice the pin does not protrude all the way out consistently as it should. If you push in the transfer bar with your finger I bet you can get that sucker to extend out all the way. Colt needs to examine the way the hammer hits the transfer bar. ....Layman talking here.


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    Last edited by Spurbitten; 02-12-2020 at 11:19 AM.

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    I'm wondering if Colt made it that way on purpose so the firing pin would not break. I'm just guessing here.

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    I haven’t had a chance to try those brands of ammo...

    I stick with what farm n fleet carries. Lol
    Winchester, federal, blazer, Remington. I have had no issues with those. I have also ran 150 handloads through it, using CCI 500 & 550 primers. No issues.

    Perhaps firing pin protrusion is an issue, or it could be a primer set too deep in the primer pocket as well.

    Remember, a primer is set to a depth of .002”-.005” of an inch per published specs.

    Can they come set deeper or set more shallow? Sure. Will some guns fire primers set out of spec? Sure, and yet others not reliably.

    I would be interested to see the suspected light primer strikes have the primer depth measured. I have seen / verified primers set as far in as .010” but those were Tula brass 9mm and I can tell you I did have ignition issues with that. The round can look fine to the naked eye and be out of spec.

    It wouldn’t bother me on range Ammo... but if it was an issue with the “premium” defense ammo that I verified primer depth was correct...I would send the gun into Colt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CrookedRiver View Post
    I havenít had a chance to try those brands of ammo...

    It wouldnít bother me on range Ammo... but if it was an issue with the ďpremiumĒ defense ammo that I verified primer depth was correct...I would send the gun into Colt.
    Interesting take on this issue. You obviously have more technical knowledge than I do but what I can say is that my 1979 Python never had any issues with light primer strikes for the brands I speak of and the 2020 does.



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    It just totally depends on the engineering of the firearm and how much “slop” the engineers designed into the gun I guess.

    Think of it this way (another analogy so hopefully the admins allow it)

    You can run a Honda Civic all day long on 85octane... but put that in a high performance Porsche 911 Turbo and the engine may knock. It wasn’t designed to run on low octane fuel. Nothing is wrong with the car, it just wasn’t designed for it.

    So did the Python engineers design the gun to only fire primers set at say .001”-.006”? Which is beyond the published spec of a rimmed cartridge to allow for some manufacturing error or do they expect a perfect cartridge every time?

    We can only guess. I would hope so, but some engineers have a hard time wrapping their head around the fact poor manufacturing exists in every industry and they believe in building to specs. I have experienced this countless times in my career in engineering.

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    Thanks for the report. It more or less mirrors my experience with mine, except that you've fired yours quite a bit more than I have. I'm at 350 or so rounds, but over 1000 dry fire cycles. I haven't had any of the cylinder rotation problems, but I did find the screw under the grip you mentioned to be loose (it was on my new Cobra also). I tightened them up, but haven't put any Loctite or anything on them yet. I'll see if they work loose again.

    I've had a couple of light primer strikes, but I believe them to all be ammo related. The first one, the very first round I dropped the hammer on went CLICK. You an imagine how my heart dropped. It did the same thing through two more tries to get it to fire, both in D/A and S/A. When it still didn't fire, I abandoned that one to the "dud can" and fired off the rest of the box (Fiocchi also) with no incidents.

    The other two came out of some of my reloads that I had. I have had misfires with ammo out of that batch of primers (CCI) before, using various Smith and Wesson revolvers so I wasn't shocked. Those primers were purchased during the great Obama ammo shortage, so that may have something to do with it, or I may not have seated them deeply enough. They all fired on the second hit. The only factory round to misfire was that first one.

    I'm quite satisfied with the gun, and am worrying the staff at my LGS to death to get a 4.2" one.
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    I haven't had any malfunctions of any kind with my new Python...mechanically or ammunition related. I think mine was built towards the end of the first run of 6" barreled Pythons before they started running 4.25" models. Maybe that was after some of the problems arose and corrections had been instituted...maybe I'm just fortunate or maybe it simply hasn't happened yet. Only time and shooting it more will tell.

    While there's no way of telling since I doubt if anyone keeps records of when their ammunition was made...there was a drop in quality control during the Great Ammunition Shortage several years ago. Ammunition makers were trying to get product out of the door as fast as possible...hiring new workers...expanding capacity...and there were cases of quality lapses in the rush. It doesn't matter the cause...the result was poor quality occasionally. It's certainly within the realm of possibility that some poor quality ammunition from any maker was used in testing the new Pythons. I think many, if not most, shooters try to use up their oldest ammunition first.

    There's a huge variety of explanations for why some new Pythons have malfunctioned...poor inspections and quality control at Colt...ammunition problems...operator error...and more if one wants to get into the minutiae of potential issues. That issues have occurred is beyond argument. How widespread the problems are is open to argument...all new Pythons are defective if you believe what you read on the internet and see on YouTube...proportionality is lost.

    I think Colt will make good on the problems as they're discovered...they have too much on the line not to. There's a few thousand Pythons that might be affected...not a huge number if put in perspective but too many if yours is one of them. Those revolvers being returned must be affecting production of new guns for the time being so I think it will take some time before full production is achieved.
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