Preferred dies for .44-40
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Thread: Preferred dies for .44-40

  1. #11
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    Some times the dies loosen and back out from vibrations and you do not notice it so the next time they are slightly out of adjustment. Make sure the lock ring is very tight

  2. #12
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    Have always had good luck with the RCBS, and their customer service is fantastic.

    The plastic cover on my ages old 10-10 scale broke. Called RCBS about purchasing a new one, and they sent one free of charge.
    superdave269 likes this.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by throck3 View Post
    Thanks all for the advice. I had bought a set of used RCBS dies and had loaded a couple hundred rounds in them without a problem. All my reloads fit and worked very well, and were pleasingly accurate. It was time to load some more, and for some reason they started leaving an excessive ring right where the crimp was and they would no longer chamber in either of my Gen 3 Colts. I experimented with the seating depth, and the amount of crimp. For a moment, I was successful in getting the problem adjusted out. Fortunately, I have a new Winchester manufacture Winchester M1873 that the rounds had no problem going into and were also very accurate, so no wasted rounds to disassemble. Today, I went out to reload another 100, and once again, the crimp ring issue reappeared. I guess this was why the original owner got rid of them, although it makes no sense to me how they could change in between loadings. After searching other sites, seeing your comments here, I will try the Cowboy dies next, and see if they solve the issue. I really like the .44-40, however, I almost feel guilty shooting them instead of my .45's.
    Due to the thin brass at the mouth if the crimp isn't exactly in the crimp groove the brass buckles and won't chamber. Usually after been fired the brass is not all the same exact length which leads to this problem. If you take the de-capping pin out of the sizing die and then resize the loaded round it will chamber. Buy yourself the separate Lee crimping die (which squeezes rather than crimps) and I'll bet your problem is solved.

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  5. #14
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    Brass extrudes from being fired & run thru a sizing die which can change the length of the cartridge that's why case length should be checked once in awhile.

  6. #15
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    For me, I have found that the best combination in 44-40 is the RCBS cowboy dies, coupled with a redding crimp die. I don't know for certain if the cowboy dies are better or even different than the standard rcbs dies, but I like the color scheme and that's enough for me. The redding die works so much better than the lee factory crimp die for 44-40. I don't know why that is, as it doesn't seem to matter with other calibers, but for 44-40 it just works better.

  7. #16
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    RCBS. Never had a problem with them in any caliber.

  8. #17
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    Iíve been loading the .44/40 cartridge for twelve years now, and have experienced no problems worth mentioning in doing so. I began with an RCBS standard three-die set and a Redding Profile Crimp die. About six years ago, I began using a Redding Competition Bullet Seating Die in preference to the RCBS seating die. While the Redding seating die works very well and I will certainly continue to use it, I probably could have gotten along quite well enough with the regular RCBS seating die. These are what I have used with great satisfaction, and I canít comment on other manufacturersí dies.

    I should mention that I load and shoot only cast bullets with black powder. While Iíve tried others, I years ago settled upon bullets cast with an Accurate Bullet Moulds 430215C mould, which drops from my mould at 216 grains with 1:20 alloy. Bullets are all sized to .428-inch and lubricated with SPG lube. (A brief experiment with DGL lube convinced me that it works just as well.) I did try shooting 100 bullets at an unsized .429-inch and couldnít detect any difference in accuracy. Cartridges so loaded have been shot in six Colt Single Action revolvers, two USFA revolvers, two modern Winchester 1873 rifles (Miroku manufactured), an Uberti reproduction Model 1873 rifle, and a Remington 1-1/2 rifle (with a relined bore). I havenít experienced any problem with my standardized loads not chambering in any of these firearms. Iíve slugged the bores on about half of these, and all seem to be about .427 to .4275-inch groove diameter. All of these firearms have delivered excellent accuracy with this load.

    While I prefer to use Starline cases, Iíve used Winchester cases as well with no problems. In loading thousands of .44/40 rounds, Iíve never experienced a single case neck buckling. But all of my loading has been done with a single-stage press. I think that such case neck buckling might be more likely in a progressive press, although I have no experience with such. It may also be pertinent that I check case length after every resizing. I suspect one must exercise a bit more care in resizing cases and seating bullets with the .44/40 case as opposed to straight-wall cases such as the .45 Colt.
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  9. #18
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    I have been loading that cartridge for 15+ years. I use Hornady One-Shot case lube with RCBS standard dies. They work fine, except my last crimp station is set-up with a Redding Profile crimp die. Oh people will tell you it's a difficult cartridge to load, I don't find it so. In all this time I may have crushed 10-12 cases, usually my fault for not having them all the way into the shell plate at the de-prime re-size position on my Dillon 550.
    TB

  10. #19
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    I've got several sets, RCBS, Pacific and they all are good with each having a strength. Its the Lachmiller set, I believe, that really produces a bottleneck. I've read that was to ensure chambering with some black powder residue buildup in the chamber. I definitely keep an eye on the case lengths as the long ones will definitely bulge out when the others are properly crimped.

  11. #20
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    Redding .44-40 dies have given me good service. When loading black powder, the powder compression die sold by Buffalo Arms has been very helpful.
    van4440rcp.jpg
    longranger likes this.


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