Thoughts on Early Civilian
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Thread: Thoughts on Early Civilian

  1. #21
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    I'm tardy here but thank you all for your thoughts. I haven't got a letter on this one and I understand one is not available. I bought the gun several years ago from a dealer friend who had purchased it in an Auction of a well known Colt Collector's collection. The gun had passed through the hands of 3 knowledgable and experienced people and it passed my own, less knowledgable and experienced, sniff test so the lack of a letter is of less concern.

    The Auction description states the gun is original with a Military barrel, except for a slightly reduced front sight, and that it is factory nickel. I think that opinion is largely due to the absence of any buffing which is supported by the lack of any nickel in the stamps, except the barrel. In the experience of many, even a hint of buffing will open the stampings to allow the easy flow of a nickeling the stampings.

    The barrel is an expected decision here because is was a military barrel left over from Colts Military contracts. It was likely already blued. So I think it is logical that Colt stamped it with the new civilian serial number and refinished it in Nickel when it nickeled the rest of the gun.

    By its Serial No. the barrel is a Military barrel. While not itself condemned, it likely came from a condemned Cavalry. The last four digits of its Military SN are "2758." Thus, its Military Serial No. is either 2757 or 12757. Both would be Ainsworth stamped and his "A" stamp is above the "P" in the 8th photo ( sorry for the poor quality).

    Because of the deterioration of the italic barrel address, the consensious is that its Military SN is 12757.

    I was drawn to this SAA because its such a good example of the lengths Colt went to use all available parts. Note also how the barrel was altered to accept the Type II Ejector Housing. When the first runs of the Military Contacts ended around SN 20,000, Colt rushed to fill the orders backlog from the civilian market. The use of left over parts form the Military orders in the guns having SN's in the low 20,000's is not uncommon.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dalfort View Post
    Looks to me like someone swapped the barrel and then stamped it to match the frame.

    Notice it was done so the number could be partially seen with the ejector housing mounted....you would never know without pulling the housing that it had been restamped...and why would you pull it if the "correct" number is partially visib
    Many early condemned military parts were used up on civilian guns. Early 3 and 4 digit barrels had the number stamped above the ejector, sometimes half way. I wouldn't be so quick to disqualify this gun as altered. Those New York dealers in the 1870s were scrambling for these "strap" pistols and took what they could get, and did renickel to satisfy demand. Colt offered dealers discounts on many guns due to wear if, for example, they were salemans samples. J.P> Lower bought dozens like this at discount that had slight wear.

    JP

  3. #23
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    That's one frustration of Colt collecting. There are always other possibile explanations.

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  5. #24
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    My opinion...original and restamped by Colt. That nickel looks a 140 years old. (IMO)
    hwjhfs likes this.

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by jplower View Post
    Many early condemned military parts were used up on civilian guns. Early 3 and 4 digit barrels had the number stamped above the ejector, sometimes half way. I wouldn't be so quick to disqualify this gun as altered. Those New York dealers in the 1870s were scrambling for these "strap" pistols and took what they could get, and did renickel to satisfy demand. Colt offered dealers discounts on many guns due to wear if, for example, they were salemans samples. J.P> Lower bought dozens like this at discount that had slight wear.

    JP

    Gotcha, I guess I'm jaded as I have seen too many "enhanced" Single Actions

    It is a beautiful pistol and Id love to have it although its one of those you are gonna have to constantly explain about...


 
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