Metallurgy of early to intermediate 1st generation guns
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    Metallurgy of early to intermediate 1st generation guns

    I have a 1907 Frontier Six Shooter that is in beautiful mechanical condition. The cylinders and bore still maintain a mirror finish over 85-90% of their surface. The timing is right on and this gun shoots to point of aim. I have shot the gun on several occasions and would like to continue. However, I recently read in the Kuhnhausen manual (p. 143) That due to the soft metallurgy of the hammer and trigger on early to intermediate 1st gens dry firing is not recommended.
    Question: has anyone done or heard of hardening the hammer and trigger to prevent rapid wear and breakage?

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    I wont even dry fire my 2nd gen Colt SAA's. Get some snap caps and dry fire away or just put in your spent brass with spent primers.

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    Normal use with reasonable loads should not wear anything out at a abnormal rate.

    Snap caps should be used for any dry firing.

    As to your question the hammer is case hardened and I would leave it and the trigger as is.

    Proper lubing of the internals will most likely prevent excessive wear.

    Take care, Duane
    I don't know much but at least I know that much.

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    Sounds like we NEED a picture or two of this described beauty...

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    DSC_0005.jpg

    DSC_0006.jpg

    My first post with pictures. I hope they work.

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    The grips are Elk. I had the gun lettered and it is interesting. Then "This gun was originally shipped on October 4, 1907 to Hibbard Spencer, Bartlett & Company in Chicago. It was one of 50 in that shipment. Then "The records further indicate that subject revolver was returned to the factory on August 27, 1909 and subsequently shipped to Farwell, Ozmun , Kirk and Company in St. Paul, Minnesota and sold to Miles and Ulner in Billings, Montana on September 1, 1909."
    I find this very interesting, but does it affect value? Anybody have any ideas on why this gun was returned?

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    This is very common. No, it does not effect value unless you can locate the Person which originally purchased the Gun. Guns tied to famous People can increase the price. Guns tied to famous places can increase the price. The Gun did not sell and was returned to Colt. You're lucky Colt did not change the configuration of the Gun when it was retuned. This sometimes happens and it makes documenting the Gun all that much harder.

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    Don't dryfire any Colt SAA (or percussion for that matter). The hammer is casehardened however, and the trigger hardened through. They are not the problem, but the firing pin will break after a while. The heavy mainspring slams the hammer in the (case hardened) frame without a primer to dampen the shock. The metal underneath the case hardening is indeed a very soft iron.
    phyllis1 and lounick like this.

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    Just shoot hell out of it and you won't have to worry any of that stuff!
    krag96 likes this.

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    If it has been dry fired a lot, check the firing pin for looseness, the retaining rivet may be damaged

    p
    lounick likes this.


 
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