This is why most 1st gen SAAs are Bubba'd
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 39
Like Tree88Likes

Thread: This is why most 1st gen SAAs are Bubba'd

  1. #21
    Senior Member

    Member #
    6040
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Medina Ohio
    Posts
    1,620
    Liked
    2427 times
    What really gets me going are dealers who find an altered gun with ribbed barrel sights, cut out top straps with target sights and relined barrels an cylinders for 22 caliber,who woof it up and put a big price on them based on the craftsmanship of the work and the 'history". There's a 44 etched panel I see at a show 4 or 5 times a year with a slip hammer and cut out trigger guard, and a target front ramp sight, with corresponding square notch milled at the rear, with 80% original finish, who's owner wants 10,000 for it. Its butt ugly and no one has ever made even a close offer. He won't budge on the price, and it has languished in his case for over 7 years. Goofy.

    JP
    Chaffee, victorio1sw and dandak like this.

  2. #22
    Senior Member

    Member #
    25358
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    262
    Liked
    304 times
    Sorry CraigC but I have to disagree with you on this one. In the case of the SAA, as with much of “Old West” lore, I think Hollywood and popular culture have shaped our perceptions of these guns more so than verifiable history. Hell, as long as writers have been commentating on the exploits of the famous “pistoleros” of that era, hyperbole has prevailed. The bottom line is this, the Vast majority of these guns were purchased, carried and utilized by folks who were far more concerned with keeping their family’s fed than making a name for themselves as the fastest gun in the west. They utilized these guns, when necessary, exactly as ol’ Sam intended. Of course there are exceptions, but I can assure you the sight of a cowboy fanning a hammer from the hip and dropping 6 banditos in a dusty saloon is the stuff of big-screen make believe. Heck, quite a few of the famous lawmen and outlaws we revere today killed plenty of men who didn’t have anything hanging off their belt but their britches. How quick do you need to be on the draw when your shooting someone at point blank range while they’re in the middle of a card game? In my opinion, modifying SAA’s in every manner imaginable so that they can be drawn quicker and fired rapidly is a practice, albeit an early one, rooted more in romanticized fantasy than historical practicality.
    dandak and jrm like this.

  3. #23
    Supporting Member
    Supporting Member

    Member #
    12998
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    The Great Plains
    Posts
    4,300
    Liked
    8788 times
    This is the only SA that I have that's been substantially modified. 1892 gun Christy converted to .22. It works well. I wouldn't call this a 'bubba' job, but I don't think it has much real value other than a curiosity.




    'This is King Fisher's Road--Take the other one'

  4. Remove Advertisements
    ColtForum.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #24
    Supporting Member
    Supporting Member

    Member #
    22303
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    West Tennessee
    Posts
    1,489
    Liked
    1930 times
    Quote Originally Posted by hearsedriver View Post
    Kids aren't taking guitar lessons anymore. There are no guitar paying idols anymore.
    I disagree. It must depend on what you listen to. IMHO, there is more guitar playing talent alive today than at any other time. It just ain't present in pop music.



    Quote Originally Posted by VoyPescado View Post
    Sorry CraigC but I have to disagree with you on this one. In the case of the SAA, as with much of “Old West” lore, I think Hollywood and popular culture have shaped our perceptions of these guns more so than verifiable history. Hell, as long as writers have been commentating on the exploits of the famous “pistoleros” of that era, hyperbole has prevailed. The bottom line is this, the Vast majority of these guns were purchased, carried and utilized by folks who were far more concerned with keeping their family’s fed than making a name for themselves as the fastest gun in the west. They utilized these guns, when necessary, exactly as ol’ Sam intended. Of course there are exceptions, but I can assure you the sight of a cowboy fanning a hammer from the hip and dropping 6 banditos in a dusty saloon is the stuff of big-screen make believe. Heck, quite a few of the famous lawmen and outlaws we revere today killed plenty of men who didn’t have anything hanging off their belt but their britches. How quick do you need to be on the draw when your shooting someone at point blank range while they’re in the middle of a card game? In my opinion, modifying SAA’s in every manner imaginable so that they can be drawn quicker and fired rapidly is a practice, albeit an early one, rooted more in romanticized fantasy than historical practicality.
    You think Texas Rangers and other folks in Elmer Keith's day did such things because they saw it in a movie???
    BoSabbath likes this.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

  6. #25
    Senior Member

    Member #
    19511
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    The Rolling Plains
    Posts
    1,130
    Liked
    1245 times
    Equating the needs of Texas Rangers with those of the general readership of Elmer Keith is hilarious. Elmer wasn't writing this article to educate "Texas Rangers". He was writing it for the version of "tacti-cool" of his day. Yes, the same guy who has a fully outfitted AR15 with a slipstock on it is the guy who read Elmer's article and turned his SAA into a "slipgun" By definition, he bubba'd it. Were there people that had a need for a slip gun? Sure, just like soldiers in WW1 and 2 made all kinds of modifications to their personal weapons that they thought made them function better and more reliable. But the vast majority of people who read Elmers articles had no need for a slip gun. Using Texas Rangers as a defense for the slip gun in this article is ridiculous. I probably have about the same number of guns in my personal safe as all the slip guns ever carried by Texas Rangers. It was a personal preference thing, but I would imagine most rangers didn't feel it was worth the danger/reliability issues. Since Frank Hamer has been brought up, "Old Lucky" was not a slip gun, and is the only gun Frank was known to have carried his entire Ranger career. He had various other guns that changed over time but it remained. The only Ranger I know of from memory that was documented to use a slip gun was Waxahacie Smith, but that was because he was missing his trigger finger and middle finger from his shooting hand.

    Elmer is a good read, but could also be a blowhard that espoused some really questionable ideas. Sure he saw a gun as a tool. Just because something is a tool doesn't mean you abuse and mistreat it. I have guns and tools both that have been in my family since the 1890s. They have been used, some of them very hard, but they have also been taken care of. A SAA in the 30s would still run you $34 or so based on colts catalogue, thats roughly $500 today. Not expensive but not pocket change either. I am blessed that both sides of my family going way back have been ranchers in Texas, heck my great great great grandfather was the blacksmith who maintaned the tools for when they built the State Capital, I have one of his hammers. He took care of it because his lively hood depended on it. Just because Elmer wrote about it, neither makes it correct nor does it make it "functional or appropriate".

    And again this article has jack squat to do with "people who's lives depended on their guns". Elmer wrote the article and his readers started jacking around in their basemen or their garage to have a "slip gun" just like Elmer. In short they bubba'd their guns. By very definition they bubba'd their guns. Just because Elmer wrote about it doesn't mean it didn't get bubba'd by a bunch of jackwagons messing around.

    Accuracy has always been more important then speed, and going back to Texas Rangers, the old time rangers were practical and astute lawmen, they didn't engage dangerous criminals on their terms. More often then note, they rightly shot a dangerous criminal by surprise. Thats why their reputation has always been more on the practical side then some hollywood dreamed up honorable ideal.

    Slip guns are right up their with people thinking they need hair triggers on their guns.....
    dandak likes this.

  7. #26
    Senior Member

    Member #
    25358
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    262
    Liked
    304 times
    “You think Texas Rangers and other folks in Elmer Keith's day did such things because they saw it in a movie???”
    What an ubsurd assertion. Everyone knows Elmer Keith styled all of his gunslinging antics after the hit video game Red Dead Revolver!
    Seriously, asserting that a “slip gun” is the functional equivalent of a shotgun with the stock and barrel sawed off is a bit of a stretch. Furthermore, Elmer Keith earned a reputation for a variety of antics, life and death gun fighting certainly wasn’t one of them. You’d certainly be hard pressed to demonstrate the prevalence of “hammer fanning/ slip gunning” as an actual tactical measure among Texas Ranger’s of the era. Bottom line, the gun in that article is “Bubbafied”. I don’t care who claimed responsibility for the hack job nor how fervently they espoused it’s merits.
    Kingcobb and dandak like this.

  8. #27
    Supporting Member
    Supporting Member

    Member #
    22303
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    West Tennessee
    Posts
    1,489
    Liked
    1930 times
    You guys are going off the rails. The point was NOT to equate the modifications done to the Texas Rangers' guns to the slip gun in the article. The point is that they are ALL rather obvious modifications done for a specific purpose. The OP did not call out slip guns specifically but pretty much any modification as "Bubba-ed".

    Yes, I'm sure that thousands of Keith's readers ran down the the basement and turned their favorite Colt SAA into a slip gun. That's why there's so many around. You can't walk into a gun or pawn shop without running into one. Not.

    A slip gun is not made for fanning. It's made for slip-shooting. How can you have this conversation and not know the difference? Most CAS competitors are actually slip-shooting. The idea that it is not a viable method for shooting a sixgun fast is absurd and probably an indication of the difference between collectors and serious single action shooters.

    A brand new SAA might've been $34 but how much was a surplus model? If you'll recall, the .45Colt that Keith blew the loading gate off of was a surplus blackpowder model. Doing such modifications to a Colt SAA in the 1930's would be no different than doing so with military surplus M9's today. No one would think anything of it. Do you think that in 100yrs people will be having the same conversation about modified Ruger 10/22's? Maybe. Do we care? Nope. Reminds me of a quote about judging history from today's perspective.


    Quote Originally Posted by VoyPescado View Post
    If Elmer Keith had put a 90 degree bend in the barrel of a SAA and claimed it was better suited for shooting around corners, many on this forum would be applauding him for his visionary innovation...I’m with Dandak on this one, that gun is plain “ruint”.
    Furthermore, not everyone on the opposing side of this argument is a Keith Kool Aid drinker. I have much respect for Keith and his work but have been in many an online scuffle because I didn't go all the way and drink the Kool Aid. Such as when I state that Keith did not develop the .357Mag and .44Mag. Or that he did not design the famous "Keith" bullets that bear his name. Or that he wasn't really much of a handgun hunter.
    BoSabbath and Homerfan like this.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

  9. #28
    Senior Member

    Member #
    29200
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    In the past- another country
    Posts
    1,679
    Liked
    2026 times
    https://gunsmagazine.com/editors-pic...keith-slip-gun

    ***"In his book The Secrets of Double-Action Shooting, Bob Nichols quotes General Hatcher, who said, “Recently the late John Newman of Seattle, Washington, and Elmer Keith of Weiser, Idaho, have given prominence to what is known as ‘slip shooting’ with the .45 Single Action Army. The gun is converted into a ‘slip hammer’ revolver by altering the hammer, taking off the hammer spur entirely and substituting for it a short peg projecting to the rear and lower down on the hammer than the conventional hammer spur. The trigger is preferably removed altogether and sometimes the trigger guard itself is also removed. The gun like this can be fired rapidly and accurately by simply drawing the hammer back with the right thumb and then, when it is ready to fire, allowing the handle of the ‘slip hammer’ to escape from under the thumb. The speed with which this can be accomplished is shown by the fact that John Newman has been known to throw a tin can in the air and put four shots into it with his ‘slip hammer’ Colt before it hit the ground.”**

    Elmer always thought the SAA was Colts best revolver and modified scores of them, in EK's day the idea of buying a new SAA and squirreling it away as a investment would have been considered loco. Not long ago Colts were bought to shoot and folks modified them to their taste.







    So Elmer bubbed them to his taste and shot the hell out of them. I think if you told old Elmer to his face that he bubbed and ruined his SAA you would have a interesting conversation. lol



    One man's bubbed gun- is another mans custom revolver.
    Last edited by Ugly; 04-14-2019 at 11:05 PM.
    BigMuddy and CraigC like this.

  10. #29
    Senior Member

    Member #
    29200
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    In the past- another country
    Posts
    1,679
    Liked
    2026 times

  11. #30
    Senior Member

    Member #
    1859
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    1,839
    Liked
    1297 times
    "I think if you told old Elmer to his face that he bubbed and ruined his SAA you would have a interesting conversation."

    Times change. In the pre-WW2 years, and years shortly thereafter people were looking to the future, not the past. For most people, the past, the wars, the depression, the personal memories of the hardships of the frontier, were not something they wanted to be reminded of. Not in conversation or the preservation of artifacts. Then came the proliferation of Western Movies and TV shows. I admit, if I had not been exposed to the romance of the West in the media of the 1950s-60s, and the daily replaying of them on the Western Channel on TV today (which I watch every day), I would not have developed a love of the Old West. I have also been watching 1940s-50s gangster movies on TV. Naturally I had to buy a 1903 Colt auto, present in most every old gangster film. Our concern for the preservation of antiques is probably futile. As I said before, future generations, technologically oriented, will care little about the "old days". It used to be said that you learn from the past, history. But in reality the past is so different from modern life that there is very little correlation between the past and rapidly advancing current life. Old beliefs, techniques, procedures, and equipment become outdated in record time. So, I cherish my historical artifacts, and place great value on them. But I am not fooling myself into thinking future generations will revere them. Unfortunately that includes my large collection of Hopalong, Autry, Rogers, etc. cap guns, holsters, watches, hats, etc. Doomed to find their way in the future into a dumpster.
    volvo99man likes this.


 
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Home | Forum | Active Topics | What's New

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 11
    Last Post: 10-25-2018, 08:19 AM
  2. 2 shooter 1st gen Colt SAAs for sale
    By Brewer in forum Want to Sell
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-26-2011, 12:36 PM
  3. Why? Why? Why? Omigosh! Why?
    By mm6mm6 in forum Colt Revolvers
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-20-2011, 01:02 PM
  4. 1st gen. SAAs and Reno Gun Shows
    By peacemaker in forum Colt Revolvers
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01-20-2011, 07:01 PM
  5. What the..........Why, why, why?
    By mm6mm6 in forum Colt Semiauto Pistols
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 12-30-2007, 06:14 PM
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
We are not associated with Colt's Manufacturing LLC. We are an enthusiast site comprised of Colt Fans.
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.3
Copyright © 2019 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.