Third generation
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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sebastian21 View Post
    I wonder why some forum members say to buy a 3d generation over a 1st generation. I contend that a 3d is just a clone , the same as a Uberti or Pietta. A 3d is assembled of outsourced parts. They have no historic value. The workmanship is of varying quality. They say they are shooters but you can get the same effect by shootings a Ruger Blackhawk. First and second SAA are made by Colt. The 1st have historic value. As a shooter they are a clumsy inaccurate pistol. A modern S&W is more accurate and a lot easier to load and eject. Holding The 1st generation you can wonder who had it in the 1870's and how it was used. 3d generations have no history. Third generations are over priced and of not much value historic or as a shooter.
    I don't know where to start on this B.S. About the only thing Sebastian states above that I can agree with is the fact that third generations are over priced. History is as history happened with any gun. Many first gens. probably don't have much history worth recording. We just want them to be historic. I dealt with old 18th and 19th century houses for many years in the PA. State Park Service. Everybody wants to save old "Historical" houses. Fact is most of these houses are simply old, but not very historic. Old guns are the same way. Unless a particular Colt SAA has a paper trail provenance to a past individual, or historic event, said Colt is just another old gun with a possible romantic history. And this romance is in the mind of the gun's current owner, not in the iron and wood heart of the old Colt. If I use one of my third generation SAA's to stop a robbery, or shoot a burglar, then that gun has a history of record that far surpasses the imagined history of a first generation cousin that is just old but has no known past. My third generation Colts aren't "clumsy" and are not "inaccurate" either. If I am shooting a Colt SAA I don't really care if it takes longer to load and eject. The part about a S&W being more accurate. This might be true or untrue depending on the individual guns being shot. I think some on this forum often write crap just because they want to be noticed.
    tgoose1, RDS and texagun like this.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by SMLE1907 View Post
    I don't know where to start on this B.S. About the only thing Sebastian states above that I can agree with is the fact that third generations are over priced. History is as history happened with any gun. Many first gens. probably don't have much history worth recording. We just want them to be historic. I dealt with old 18th and 19th century houses for many years in the PA. State Park Service. Everybody wants to save old "Historical" houses. Fact is most of these houses are simply old, but not very historic. Old guns are the same way. Unless a particular Colt SAA has a paper trail provenance to a past individual, or historic event, said Colt is just another old gun with a possible romantic history. And this romance is in the mind of the gun's current owner, not in the iron and wood heart of the old Colt. If I use one of my third generation SAA's to stop a robbery, or shoot a burglar, then that gun has a history of record that far surpasses the imagined history of a first generation cousin that is just old but has no known past. My third generation Colts aren't "clumsy" and are not "inaccurate" either. If I am shooting a Colt SAA I don't really care if it takes longer to load and eject. The part about a S&W being more accurate. This might be true or untrue depending on the individual guns being shot. I think some on this forum often write crap just because they want to be noticed.
    With your attitude about old firearms, antique U.S. Colt SAAs should be bargain priced. Weak metal, usually well worn, often with modifications, very few with any "paper trail provenance to a past individual, or historic event". I will have to check the selling price of U.S Colt SAAs to see how many people agree with you. How about those Copper Queen Mine shipped guns, and guns shipped to rough and tumble Old West towns in the early years. Just more boring old guns with no "paper trail provenance to a past individual, or historic event"?

    Many of us are entranced with the history and romance of the Old West era. We have no way of knowing what adventures these old guns may have been involved in, back when Colt SAAs were not just recreational firearms, but implements used for more serious life or death matters in often lawless times. You are lacking in imagination. I am not. Every time I hold one of my old Colt SAAs I wonder what exciting escapades it and it's owner may have survived, back when America was a different self sufficient place and you did not dial 911 in a life threatening situation. When I shoot my old Colt SAAs I form a bond with other long ago owners who held that gun in their hand and used it under very different circumstances in Americas developmental history. Lawman, outlaw, soldier, I do not know. I just like to think about what could have been out on the Frontier. That link with the Old West you will not experience with a 3rd generation Colt SAA.
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  3. #63
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    johnh: Glad you feel the way you do about your old Colts. When you mentioned Colts known to have been shipped to the Copper Queen Mine and also US marked ones you moved these guns into the category of ones with at least partially known histories which makes these more valuable historically and intrinsically. So I don't know what your point is by mentioning such pieces. Maybe I should have also mentioned SAA's that were marked with the purchaser's identities as making these guns more valuable also,......my mistake. But I didn't think stating the obvious was really necessary. I believe I mentioned, and you verified, the fact that collectors that possess old single actions with no known histories like to imagine what these histories might have been. So, what is your point in restating this?

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  5. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by SMLE1907 View Post
    johnh: Glad you feel the way you do about your old Colts. When you mentioned Colts known to have been shipped to the Copper Queen Mine and also US marked ones you moved these guns into the category of ones with at least partially known histories which makes these more valuable historically and intrinsically. So I don't know what your point is by mentioning such pieces. Maybe I should have also mentioned SAA's that were marked with the purchaser's identities as making these guns more valuable also,......my mistake. But I didn't think stating the obvious was really necessary. I believe I mentioned, and you verified, the fact that collectors that possess old single actions with no known histories like to imagine what these histories might have been. So, what is your point in restating this?
    The point is simple. As I stated these old Colt SAAs existed in a time many of us wish we could have experienced, The Old West. Their history may be unknown, but they were there. You specifically stated "paper trail provenance to a past individual, or historic event", your words, which mere shipping destination with no other provenance does not include.

    I watch old Western movies, read books on the Frontier era, and own many artifacts from that era. I also own original old Bowie knives from the Frontier era. They have been there, done that. Although I do not know their history, holding them and thinking what may have been fascinates me. I guess I could just buy a high quality repro Bowie knife but it would not be the same to me. It is just a modern made item, made to look like a historical artifact. Like 3rd generation Colts. Provenance does not have to be documented, the fact that the object existed in the Frontier era gives it historical credibility.

    Below is a picture of an early Texas Ranger. That Colt he is carrying looks just like the old Colt sitting next to me on my desk. No one can prove it is not the same gun. I think it just may be. Can't make that possible association with my 3rd generation Colts.

    sergeant-ira-aten-texas-ranger-KREW4R (2).jpg
    Cozmo and EricdeFrance like this.

  6. #65
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    All of my old colts have historical value because they all have notches on the handle. We all know what that means, and certainly nobody put them there many years after the fact
    SMLE1907 and Shuttle50 like this.

  7. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by bighipiron View Post
    All of my old colts have historical value because they all have notches on the handle. We all know what that means, and certainly nobody put them there many years after the fact
    Lets see some pictures. Sounds interesting.


 
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