Are these Grips real Ivory? I hope so.
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Thread: Are these Grips real Ivory? I hope so.

  1. #31
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    Narwhal tusks... Not just for grips anymore...

    "The hero bystanders who subdued the London Bridge knife attacker included a chef who fought off the jihadist with an ornamental 5-foot narwhal tusk and another who brandished a fire extinguisher. British media identified the chef as Lukasz, a man from Poland, who was injured by the assailant, convicted terrorist Usman Khan. Two people were stabbed to death and three were injured before Khan was shot dead by police. Lukasz worked at nearby Fishmongers Hall, where the horrific attack began during a prison rehabilitation event, the Sun reported, before spilling out on to the street. A narwhal is a type of whale sometimes known as the "unicorn of the sea" because of its distinct "tusk", which is actually a tooth. It can reach lengths of up to 10 feet."
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cozmo View Post
    I suspect you could resin impregnate the open material in walrus ivory. Why bother would be my question when there are much better and more durable sources for grip material.
    Maybe because he likes them and I see nowhere he ask you if you would bother,

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
    Maybe because he likes them and I see nowhere he ask you if you would bother,
    Check out post 11 . Good eye though , the OP didn't ask that question.
    All injuries to pride are self inflicted.

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  5. #34
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    Superdave , Did you keep them? Me , I would keep them just to try on at times and a good working reference . You can always buy other material later . It's not every day a fellow gets a chance to buy walrus tusk and if you don't like them in the future , I'll bet the market is still there to sell. Send more pictures if you have them and the time . Thanks
    All injuries to pride are self inflicted.

  6. #35
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    Hey Someguy, I decided to keep them. Honestly I would not of bought them knowing they were walrus but once I had them I figured that I probably would never order a set of walrus ivory so I better keep them. I believe that the seller was honest with me he said that he inherited them from his father and his father was a gun guy and told him they were ivory. I did ask if they were elephant ivory before I paid for them. He also did say I could return them but wanted me to pay the shipping. I am disappointed that they are not elephant ivory but I'm sure they are the only set of walrus ivory that I will ever own. I think it pretty cool to have a set even though it wasn't what I was shopping for. Since I jointed this group I have acquired: giraffe bone, elk stag, ram horn, buffalo, ivory and now walrus. I already had walnut and the black Colt grips. I do appreciate everyone taking the time to offer me some wanted help with these.
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  7. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Some guy View Post
    [QUOTE I imagine they're mostly found by some lucky diver somewhere on the floor of the ocean and are few and far between.

    That almost sounds like a story I would tell my babes when the dog was put down. Hell , they just shoot them , lots of work to process , eat and share in hunt , then find some fat cat to buy the ivory to make something they don't need in the first place. Most ivory used nowadays is for show . Me , I , like the stuff that died about 10,000 years ago . Don't get me wrong , I'd love to be in on a Mammoth hunt.
    In California, Mastodon and Mammoth ivory is illegal. I guess those very nice folks in Sacramento are afraid of those animals becoming extinct. Bless their hearts.
    Last edited by bighipiron; 12-02-2019 at 02:14 PM.
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  8. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by bighipiron View Post
    In California, Mastodon and Mammoth ivory is illegal. I guess those very nice folks in Sacramento are afraid of those animals becoming extinct. Bless their hearts.
    It's more simple than that. The bureaucrats in charge can't tell the difference between pachyderms and they aren't interested in learning. It's much easier to outlaw everything. Regrettably other states (most recently Illinois) are modeling California's laws.
    jringo8769 likes this.

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