Highly engraved SAA, 1950’s, my prized possession...
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Thread: Highly engraved SAA, 1950’s, my prized possession...

  1. #11
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    I like it. Congrats on such a wonderful revolver.
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  2. #12
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    Have to agree with others: soon as I saw it I thought "German" then I saw the tipis, which kind of confused things a little. Did your dad spend any time in Europe in the '50s or '60s? Anyway, Congrats On having that nice family piece.
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  3. #13
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    Paul Yaeger of Jenkinstown, PA had lots of gun engraving work done by well known European (German) engravers in the 1950's. Here is example of a S&W that was done through his shop.




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  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtm9095
    I would seriously like to know who engraved and finished it.
    I'll go against the grain here. I think it is very well done gun. As mentioned previous just not what we are used to seeing in today's work a full 50+ years later. But not something uncommon for the best master engravers in the '50s early '60 either. Certainly at a level not commonly seen then or now. Engraved screws?! Inside the loading gate and trigger guard? Who does that? But notable...nothing on the hammer or the front sight. Very traditionally done as a fancy work gun.

    SW USA or Texas? Texas Hill country is know for Oaks. This gun screams Texas or Hollywood to me. And between them I'd say Texas with a German influence.

    One of the actor's Tom Mix guns that is displayed in OKC at the National Cowboy Museum has a very similar pattern (but no where close to being so elaborate) including the Teepees in the same place on the right side of the frame. I'd bet there is a connection in one form or another. But there are many guns in the Movie cowboy display there that this gun easily mimics.



    The engraver put some real effort into that gun and pair of grips. I suspect it is worth a lot more than what has been suggested.



    I'd bet if you reached out to the Firearms Engravers Guild of America they could easily identify who did your Dad's gun. Frank Hendricks (1928-2003) early work comes to mind as does the work of many of his students. Or just as easily someone that influenced Hendricks. If it were mine I'd ask Weldon Lister who he sees in the gun as a start. I shoot most of my engraved guns. But one thing for sure with this one, I wouldn't be shooting it until I knew the full story behind the art work.

    Tom Mix SAA in OKC which I believe was a factory engraved gun.



    And a pair of guns in OKC that the engraver was not credited..[edit] this pair are very likely Fugger guns... and 2 of the 5 we have been able to find photos of
    Last edited by Cozmo; 02-10-2020 at 03:25 PM.

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by saintclair View Post
    Paul Yaeger of Jenkinstown, PA had lots of gun engraving work done by well known European (German) engravers in the 1950's. Here is example of a S&W that was done through his shop.
    Yeager was fairly popular back in his time - did some nice work on mausers and Sako rifles. I had a Sako rifle Yeager had done some work on - fantastic rifle.

  7. #16
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    I think the engraving is very attractive for the motif. The work that went into the carving of the ivory grips is amazing. The appearance of the gun is unique, and it has a true "work of art" appearance.
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  8. #17
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    I like it!
    It really doesn't matter who did what or where it was shipped. It was handed down to you and that makes it priceless.
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  9. #18
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    Love everything about it. The engraving may be a bit larger (not as fine) and deeper than what we are used to but I like it a lot. If you decide to go with plainer grips that do not overpower the engraving, let me know as I will swap (assuming real) for a pair of plain ivories!!!!
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  10. #19
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    There was a German author called Karl May who wrote Western novels in the late 1800's. Very successful as there was great admiration for all things "western" from the US... His books were translated to English, French, Italian and Spanish.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_May

  11. #20
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    The gun was delivered to Abercrombie & Fitch in 1957 as per Colt Archives as a Blue gun. So it must have been engraved and finished sometime afterwards. My Dad bought it in Venezuela and was told that it was originally gifted to Venezuelan Strongman "Cnel. Marcos Perez Jimenez" by a US Military Acquaintance... He was deposed in 1958, exiled to the US till 63' when he was extradited back to Venezuela. The Horse on the grip and on the frame by the patent #'s could be a remembrance of the Nat'l Hero Simon Bolivar. The grip is not made of Ivory, there are no typical age or drying cracks. So it's doubtful that it would have been engraved in Germany if the "Provenance" story is true. I'm not sure when Dad bought it, could have been anytime between 1967 at the earliest and early 70's at the latest.

    **The Horse on the grip and on the frame by the patent #'s could be a remembrance of the Nat'l Hero Simon Bolivar

    Correction/Deletion: Don't know what I was thinking... That's Colt's COLT!
    Last edited by jtm9095; 02-08-2020 at 08:47 PM. Reason: Correction/Deletion


 
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