Highly engraved SAA, 1950’s, my prized possession...
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    Lightbulb Highly engraved SAA, 1950’s, my prized possession...

    This was my Dad’s gun and I just received the Colt Archive’s certificate of authenticity. I’m disappointed because it describes it as a “Blue” finish with no stock description. It’s really a Black Nickel finish, (I believe), highly engraved SA Army .45, apparently shipped originally to the flagship Abercrombie &Fitch store in NYC in 1957. So unless Colt archives made an error, this gun was engraved privately post sale. I would seriously like to know who engraved and finished it. There is no visible signature anywhere on the gun. I Welcome any thoughts or ideas!CC78D25E-2D38-4866-B247-772B810A6E76.jpgA98DAD08-F16C-4EF6-AAFD-DA91EE9B90B2.jpg5DCAE80A-79B9-458C-9611-0C34E5D65830.jpg
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    Very interesting ivory grip treatment. Unfortunately the profuse engraving is not high quality but is also interesting. IMO, a great keepsake from your dad but the engraving adds no value. Shoot it and remember your dad when you do.
    jtm9095 likes this.

  3. #3
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    It is fun to shoot although it’s been a good while.

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    Wow, I really like those grips!

    Engraving looks pretty neat to me - I like the Indian head at the base of the hammer. Very cool piece, especially it being something handed down in the family.
    ColtsDad, Cozmo, jtm9095 and 2 others like this.

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    I like it.
    jtm9095 likes this.

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    I actually like the oak leaf and acorn though it seems odd to pair it with Indians. While the quality may not be what we're used to, it's a bunch of deep relief work. It looks European, possibly Germanic. The stocks are nicely carved and, in my opinion, would look much better without the dyed negative space.
    Last edited by Rick Bowles; 02-07-2020 at 05:48 PM.

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  8. #7
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    Thought the same thing. The oak leaf and acorn motif was very popular in Germany. May have been engraved in Germany.

    arjay and lboos like this.

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    Love those grips!
    Asking questions and learning stuff.
    *I used to be here as goin camping. Then the forum went wonky and I had to get a new account*

  10. #9
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    I pretty much agree with what everyone has said so far. I would like to see the bottom of the grips if they too are not carved. They look like ivory but I do not see any grain or age cracks. Look very close all over the gun for a signature. It can be a name or even a symbol of some type. It may be in a rather odd place. Some engravers like to almost hide their signatures. The engraving has the look of a 1950s or 60s engraver. I have a book on American engravers that has short biographys of a lot of for the most part unknown engravers. Many of them have work that is like this. Your engraver may be listed in the book. The work could have been done in Germany as many USGIs had guns done while stationed there. The work does not seem to good enough for their work but you never know. You may have more history on the gun that could eliminate this possibility.
    jtm9095 likes this.
    This all started with one gun!
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    Although we generally think of Cowboys and Indians being of western territory, there were plenty of Indians in the northeast of the U.S. where Oaks are very common.
    The engraving is profuse on this; even the inside of the trigger guard!

    A neat piece. I’d be happy to have it.

    A plainer set of grips would help to keep the eye on the gun instead of gravitating to the off-color yellow.
    All SAA work. Check out my webpage.

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