Case Coloring on Recent production SAA Revolvers
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Thread: Case Coloring on Recent production SAA Revolvers

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by bighipiron View Post
    It was bone and wood from a very reputable outfit
    I'm no expert but that looks like a chemical dip. I hope not if you wanted real bone and charcoal.
    Colt SAA and Colt 1st gen SAA,
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    Uberti Open Top 1872 model in .45Colt with 7 1/2" barrel, Colt M1945A1, Winchester 1873 & 94.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by SFC Rick View Post
    I'm no expert but that looks like a chemical dip. I hope not if you wanted real bone and charcoal.
    Definitely not a dip. Here are some better pictures with the gun assembled. Note the hammer and lever, which looks a bit more traditional. Different steel? I don't know. Also a before picture
    Winchester 1873 two.jpgWinchester and 51's 1.jpgWinchester and 51's 2.jpg

  3. #23
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    I suppose there could be worse concerns in the world today, but what I have not liked about later Colt SAA revolvers is the production of "designer" guns which is an amalgamation of variations that existed in the past for various reasons and were discontinued for various reasons, but can be purchased, now or recently, at the whim of the customer:

    Namely, vivid case coloring--NOT in keeping with historical precedent;

    Black powder frame: Discontinued when smokeless powder became more readily available and because it is an improvement, as it does not take a screwdriver to remove a screw, which can be easily lost, to remove the base pin;

    Long flutes: These were simply to use up remaining 1878 cylinders in inventory. Yankee thrift, not a nifty variation at the time.

    Etc.

    So, I suppose if everything else is removed from historical precedent, why not the case colouring, as well?
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  5. #24
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    The now defunct USFA produced some of the finest fitted and beautiful case colors going.
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  6. #25
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    This my first SAA Colt. The case colors are much more vivid than I thought they would be.
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  7. #26
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    Aw come on, who doesn't like Turnbull colors?! (queue the circus music, imagine clowns piling out of a tiny car all shooting "POW!" flags out of SAAs like this).
    Here is a thread from last year with 100 posts about the same topic: https://www.coltforum.com/forums/sin...mparisons.html

    Last edited by azshot; 02-13-2020 at 06:59 PM.

  8. #27
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    I may be late to this party, but I think the most beautiful colors that I have seen are those on quality English doubles. The wrought iron and different steels that Colt used must have given them fits trying to match previous colors. What I really don’t like is a faux or imitation process. Colors produced with a torch or acid have no place on a real Colt.

  9. #28
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    The 73 receiver is not bone and charcoal. It is a dip of some kind. See the waves where it was lowered into the concoction. Looks like the colors on old H&R single shot shotguns.
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    This all started with one gun!
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  10. #29
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    I have an idea that could put to rest this debate. Since there are a few gentlemen here on this forum with the knowledge and skill to CCH you could do an experiment for us. Get a piece of 147 year old steel and CCH it using Colt's original recipe and process. Then we could know if the colors were muted or bright back then. Since nobody here today was alive back then, nobody really knows what these finishes looked like when original. Since the inception of photoshop, no pictures can be trusted to truly depict what these guns looked like when new, also time and environmental variables can fade anything. A ' controlled ' experiment is needed to seperate fact from fiction, truth from opinion. Personally I would love to see it, and if it worked I would want whoever does it to refinish a gun or two of mine, for a fee of course.
    " I've got 1 bullet and it's got your email address on it. Don't make me hit send."

  11. #30
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    There are surviving guns that do have very nice original case colors from the early percussion days forwards. The best original colors remain on the inside and protected places. Even the best original colors have been affected to some dergee by time and exposure to light and air. Some of the cased Colts have survived in nearly new condition. The closest you will come is to look at excellent surviving examples.

    The original formulas and methods are long gone. Each company and even the individual doing the work would have had some variance in how they did the job. Even the batch of Iron being used would have a slight impact on the results. As I said earlier no two guns are alike and the process changes all the time. This is not something that comes through time completely untouched like the blue finish on most guns. Many guns have excellent original blue that looks just like it did the day it left the factory.

    Lots of restoration experts claim to use the original process but they all have some slight differences and theirs even vary from job to job.
    This all started with one gun!
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