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Maybe I’m missing something but this one confuses me.
-listed as COLT WWII REPRO MODEL M1911A1 STAINLESS X1X NIB
-noted as experimental model 1 of 2 serial number X1X
-box reads M1911 in carbonia blue with stainless written on tape
-listed as WWII repro and model is WWI repro
-serial number on box written in
-serial number on pistol reads X1X
-seller claims “pistol was a experimental model serial number X1X. Colt never produced this model with a stainless finish so only two exist with the serial numbers X1X and X2X”.

I’m new to Colt’s so please excuse me if this is legit and known. Just doesn’t seem right to me. Thanks

http://www.gunbroker.com/item/703102270
 

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It isn't an experimental WW2 M1911A1.

It is the initial one-off stainless reproduction model of the M1911 that Colt sold as a 100 year commemorative. The M1911 has a flat mainspring housing, a short trigger, no frame cuts behind the trigger, wood double diamond stocks, and extensive slide markings.
 

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Wow. What a unique Colt. Obviously an unfaithful reproduction of the WWI 1911. Super cool though.
 

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Almost 16K to start? And several red flags?

No letter , no deal.
 

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OK...when did stainless steel become a "finish"? Stainless steel is a type of steel...as far as I know you can't layer on a stainless finish on anything.

That pistol has awful soft edges like it's been excessively polished. Even if it's genuine the cost of playing is too high for me.
 

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I expect this frame pictured, is what kenhwind has in mind, and for the most part it's appearance is 1911, not "A1".

pewter .45   mmc sight Tokarev  Romania bayonet 007.JPG
 

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They didn't have the technology to produce a pistol from stainless steel
during WWII -- at least one that would work. Those problems were not
fully solved until the 1970's. Detonics, I believe was the first to produce
a successful .45ACP pistol all in stainless that was actually reliable.

The problem was "galling" -- the tendency of the slide and frame to stick
together in action (heat). I believe that Smith & Wesson was the first one
to fully solve this by using different grades of stainless in the slide and frame.
 

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They didn't have the technology to produce a pistol from stainless steel
during WWII -- at least one that would work. Those problems were not
fully solved until the 1970's. Detonics, I believe was the first to produce
a successful .45ACP pistol all in stainless that was actually reliable.

The problem was "galling" -- the tendency of the slide and frame to stick
together in action (heat). I believe that Smith & Wesson was the first one
to fully solve this by using different grades of stainless in the slide and frame.

Yep...S&W used two different grades of stainless, Colt uses different heat treatments between frames and slides. Two different solutions to the same problem. Stainless steel in revolvers had some issues early on as well but as you said, the technology had to be worked out.
 
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OK...when did stainless steel become a "finish"? Stainless steel is a type of steel...as far as I know you can't layer on a stainless finish on anything.
Not practical for a gun, but stainless steel can be bonded to other metals by explosive welding or bonding. An explosive charge is set off across the stainless steel, bonding it to a dissimilar metal. That is the way the metal for our clad coins is made.
 

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Interesting to know. Thanks for the info.
 
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Not practical for a gun, but stainless steel can be bonded to other metals by explosive welding or bonding. An explosive charge is set off across the stainless steel, bonding it to a dissimilar metal. That is the way the metal for our clad coins is made.
That is also how they weld aluminum to steel. The two dissimilar metals are blasted together, one side is welded to steel the other aluminum. they used on big mega yachts and I assume larger vessels also.
 

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I always thought it was the AMT Hardballer that solved the galling issues.

interesting question though.
 
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