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I'm thinking varmints both two and four legged will not care for that load but point of aim is the question in a S.A.A. The 380 load might be a dandy.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I'm thinking varmints both two and four legged will not care for that load but point of aim is the question in a S.A.A. The 380 load might be a dandy.
Am thinking it would shoot rather low, due both to low recoil as well as hyper velocity. A little pricey to test fire, but it would appear to be a devastating load. For a New Frontier or SAA that shot high, it would be an easy choice.

EDIT: .45 Colt is $24.99 at Academy Sports. A $25 order nets you free shipping.
 
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Ultra light bullets with high velocity are a trick that has been around for quite a while. Years ago, a friend of mine got into a competition at his gun club to see who could create the fastest load. He finally won by casting some 17-18 grain zinc 9mm bullets that ran thru the chronograph at almost 4000 fps! And that was out of a 4" bbl Luger! I have some Georgia Arms .44 magnum "Deerslayer" ammo that I shoot in my Ruger RedHawk that pushes a 200 grain bullet at about 1600 fps for about 1200 foot pounds of energy! Now that is a REAL defense load. Lots of recoil, but all you need is one hit!
 

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The velocity is impressive, but due to a VERY lightweight 78 grain bullet. That translates to only 560 feet pounds of energy.

A 250 grain bullet can reach 1,000 and above. It all depends on the usage of the cartridge I suppose. :cool:
 

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Starting with the Glazer Safety Sugs back in the early 1970s (there was probably something before that) I learned a great truth. There are no magic bullets. And...

The foot pounds of energy developed by a given load is a poor and misleading measure of how a cartridge will perform against an assailant. Penetration and wound size (how big is the hole) are much better measures. A 78g .45" projectile is likely a poor penetrator.

Dave
 

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When the .220 Swift was brought out with a muzzle velocity of over 4100 fps with a 40 grain bullet it was thought that it would be a deadly killer due to the velocity alone. Some solid copper bullets were tried on jack rabbits, and some not hit in a vital area jumped up in the air and hit the ground running.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
As "evidence" Liberty offers ballistic gelatin videos of penetration. It appears they had an eye toward limiting over-penetration. I guess a few actual "on-the-street" uses will tell the story. Funny how the .45 Coly is limited in energy, while the lowly .380 is rated at 250 ft. lbs, - about 50 over the hottest standard loads. The light bullet may make the .380 somewhat more pleasant to shoot, as some of them have a rather sharp recoil - a Sig P230 was one.

Hyper-velocity was good for the .220 Swift - within its limitations, which were not respected at the time. Although some are using much slower 80-90 grain .224s in ARs for deer. Not me.
 
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Kinda like 9mm and .30 Carbine. Speaking strictly of hardball it was common to condemn the 110 grain 1900 fps Carbine round as a poor stopper but the 115 grain 1350 fps 9mm was considered a manstopper. Even my uncle said got rid of his Carbine as quickly as possible after using it in combat.

There's no true magic bullet...and there's more to it than bullet weight and velocity.
 
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