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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello, this has been enlightening to me to learn how these digital images display om many types of equipment.

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displaying relatively decent digital view of scene on right barrel flat. appears to be some information on rammer i never noticed before. loading lever is only engraved on end 1/3 wher most often touches with sweaty fingers.i hope some of you can see something as feedback while i am dodging the virus is important to me.
regards and thanks to all, bro
 

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I agree that when looking for this information something does seem to be there but I think it is just pareidolia and there is nothing to interpret. However, I could be wrong!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I agree that when looking for this information something does seem to be there but I think it is just pareidolia and there is nothing to interpret. However, I could be wrong!
hello, lothian, thank you for your feedback. a project about a .454 made by paterson's armorers by permission of john ehlers for colt's private use demonstrated to me the problems of displaying images of this type (especially worn examples) on the ethernet. i delayed this project for about twenty years because digital images just do not do the job. the virus allowed me to finish a lot of projects which were in the pipeline the navy image situation became a prime endeavor. i have been experimenting with b & w 35 mm film but developers are all available by usps. i have film developed and not yet developed in that vast usps wasteland. so while waiting i decided to attempt with some of the better digitals to get some readout in real time. i really did not expect the positive responses received till now. b t y, butterfields sold a much better kept similarly example about twenty years ago. were it not for the virus, i would have had a professional photographer in six months ago.
regards, bro
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I see nothing out of the ordinary here....some one fill me in.
hello, the image did no turn out well at all, i wanted to see how it looked on other person's screens. hopefully, some of the b & w film will be better. i apologize for the confusion. just a bad case of cabin fever.
regards, bro
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Let us know when the phots get back
hello, thanks for the reply. if i can get any usable film i will be happy to share, just cabin fever. have caught every fish in the pond so many times i know them by the way they strike. they don't even fight anymore, just lie in the net and spit out the fly. i need a trip to the restigouche.
regards, bro
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
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I agree that when looking for this information something does seem to be there but I think it is just pareidolia and there is nothing to interpret. However, I could be wrong!
it helps to know ormsby's engraving methods. most engravers of the period employed dots or dimples as background. ormsby's engravers (he had about forty working for him) employed a background consisting of curved or straight lines. examination of the background here displays this treatment. pages 54 and 55 of tobias' book show this treatment.
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it helps to know ormsby's engraving methods. most engravers of the period employed dots or dimples as background. ormsby's engravers (he had about forty working for him) employed a background consisting of curved or straight lines. examination of the background here displays this treatment. pages 54 and 55 of tobias' book show this treatment. View attachment 734268
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It helps to know Ormsby's engraving methods. Most engravers of the period employed dots or dimples as background. Ormsby's engravers (he had about forty working for him) employed a background consisting of curved or straight lines.
You do know that Ormsby's cylinder scenes are roll-mark engraved using a flat die, don't you?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
You do know that Ormsby's cylinder scenes are roll-mark engraved using a flat die, don't you?
hello; yes, i do. technically, a flat die similar to a bank note die is made. next, a negative roll die is copied from this flat die. next, a positive image is rolled onto a positive die which then rolls the image onto the cylinder. only one original flat master die was cut for each size cylinder as more negatives and positives were needed due to wear. this is a main reason why authentic colt cylinders and original rolling's on cylinders can be documented. counterfeiters may copy the dies, but are unable to duplicate all the nuances and hidden minutiae in the original engraving. interestingly, the paterson .454 has a hand engraved cylinder ranger and fight scene. it is my opinion that only one of each model has the ranger fight scene or partly engraved on it. after the last piece was made, a number of copies of the original flat die were made, and passed out as souvenirs. some are still being sold at shows and on the internet as originals .
thank you for the information, regards, bro
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
You do know that Ormsby's cylinder scenes are roll-mark engraved using a flat die, don't you?
hello again, it is also a fact that some presentation and exhibition navy cylinders were engraved with individual scenes, not with the ormsby roll engraving.
regards, bro
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I agree that when looking for this information something does seem to be there but I think it is just pareidolia and there is nothing to interpret. However, I could be wrong!
hello, lothian, this image may show more details of lock plate right side from another angle trying new filter. thanks,
regards, bro
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
And I STILL am clueless as to what you are referring to. The pits under the lower screw maybe?
hello, no, not the terrible colt black iron rust under the screw, i am attempting to get assistance from the forum members in improving the images generated by my digital cameras in order to (hopefully) identify certain items on this navy. can you see the ships on this cylinder?. you may be familiar with the navy fight scene as engraved by waterman lily ormsby.which this one is. if viewing on an i-phone screen, you may not be able to see anything. thanks for responding. regards, bro
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