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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a friend that knows I frequent this Colt forum with questions about Colt guns. So he asked me to see if someone could help him out too. He wants a 1861 navy that has been converted to shoot 45 LC. I have no idea if such a gun exists so can anyone help with such a request?

Thanks all.
 

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While you will find 1861 Navies converted to .38 from .36 precussion and originally so manufactured , he's out of look as far as .45 goes, especially if he wants an original. He might want to look at the various conversions from Cimarron, such as the Open Tops and Richards; if he'll take an 1851, they offer two version in .38 Spl. Here's two links:
Conversion Revolvers
and:
Open Top Revolvers

Hope this helps.

Tecolote
 

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While you will find 1861 Navies converted to .38 from .36 precussion and originally so manufactured , he's out of look as far as .45 goes, especially if he wants an original. He might want to look at the various conversions from Cimarron, such as the Open Tops and Richards; if he'll take an 1851, they offer two version in .38 Spl. Here's two links:
Conversion Revolvers
and:
Open Top Revolvers

Hope this helps.

Tecolote
As the above states, there is no way an M1861 Navy can be converted to a .45 cal. cartridge pistol. If he wants to do that, he should get an M1860 Colt Army revolver These can easily be converted to .45 long or short using a conversion cylinder made specifically for whatever company manufactured his pistol.
 

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Uberti.com shows a variety of conversion repros in .45 Colt, specifically '51 Navy and one they list as '71 Navy but no illustration. Probably worth a look. If an original '61 Navy could be bored out to take the .45 Colt, I'd be afraid of it due to early materials used in it, likewise the sacrifice of a rare early Colt to make a hobby piece.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for all the info guys. So to be clear, an 1860 with a .45 LC conversion would be best way to go.

Can you give me an idea of what he could expect to pay for an 1860? I know condition is everything, but just an idea of range would be great.

Thanks again
 

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uberti.com website has the 1860 conversion in .45 Colt, various barrel lengths, $579. If you are talking about an original Colt conversion, one in good condition could run $2k up & be limited to black powder ammo & probably not in .45 Colt, more like the old .44 Colt, .44 Russian or Special & you might have to get some work done on it to take the modern ammo, like convert it from RF to CF. You might inform yourself by checking the auctions for what's being offered.
 

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As rhmc24 has pointed out, there is a big difference in prices for original '60 Armies and the modern repros, in addition to gunsmithing costs. I personally would not shoot
an original '60 converted to .45 Colt. Assuming your friend is willing to go the modern repro route, then he has some options. Uberti in Italy makes all of them, the only differences being the importers specs. I have two Cimmarron 1872 Open Tops in .44 Colt and two Cimmaron 1861 Navies (percussion) in the charcoal blue finish,and they are excellent. I don't have hands on experience with any of the other importers offerings, so I can't speak to them.
I earlier linked to the Open Top and Conversions sections of Cimarron's website; here is a link to their percussion revolvers:
Percussion Revolvers
Note the conversion cylinders at the bottom of the page. There are two types; one for an unaltered percussion gun, and the second "gated cylinder" type, meant for a revolver that has had the recoli shield reamed out so that a cartidge can be loaded from the breech, like the SAA and the conversions. However, as I understand it, doing so makes the gun a "firearm" under Federal Law, although one can load and unload fast. The first type requires removal of the barrel for both operations. Also note both types of .45 cylinders hold only 5 shots. If your friend requires the "look" of the graceful unaltered 1860 Army, with the relative ease of breech loading,that's about the only option.
If he wants the same option, but will go the 1851 Navy's looks and caliber, he might look into this:
Man With No Name Conversion .38 Colt & S&W Special, 7 1/2 in. Barrel
This is in .38 Special, which will be easier on the wallet. Speaking of ammo, all of these guns are intended to used with "cowboy" loads, not the hot Plus P stuff.
One other thing, even though you can order the percussion guns and the cylinders online, your FFL dealer may be able to order them his at lower price and pass the savings
on to you.

Hope this helps.

Tecolote
 
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