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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys -

I've got a cased colt revolver that's been in my family for 140+ years and I'd like information on how best to preserve it. The colt is silver-plated and a gun dealer sold me a can of "Sheath Rust Preventative" that "seals the surface with a protective film."

Anyone familiar with this stuff? Anyone know if it's OK to apply to silver-plate?

Plus the presentation case is wood and I'd like input on how best to preserve it. Same goes for the paper wrapped, wooden-boxed cartridge boxes. And what about the ivory grips? And the felt liner? And the 140 year old black-powder?

I'll now try to post a pic, but if I can't you can see the colt and its history at:

http://www.windsurfingbible.com/french.htm

[image]http://windsurfingbible.com/casrd_colt.htm[/image]

Thanks in advance,

Burr
 

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Welcome to the Forum... Sounds and looks like a Very Special piece... You are a lucky person to have such a gun for so long...

Assuming that all is spotless inside and out already I would highly recommend Renaissance Wax/Polish... It can be applied to both your gun as well as your wood box for protection...

Excerpts obtained via the net...
RENAISSANCE WAX is used in the following places in the U.S. - The Smithsonian Institute, Colonial Williamsburg Conservatory, Abraham Lincoln Residence, Vicksburg Military Park and Museum, Henry Food Museum, Academy of Arts, Metropolitan Museum of Art, NRA Museum, Rockefeller Restorations, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Hilton Hotels, BYU Museum of Art, National Ornamental Metals Museum, as well as other museums, government agencies, craftsmen, collectors both professional and amature alike.

In the United Kingdom it is used in the British Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum, Buckingham Palace, Military Museums at Aldershot, H.M. the Queens Royal Armourer, The National Museum of Antiquities - Scotland, Royal Armories (London & Leeds), The Imperial War Museum, Windsor Castle, and The Tower of London.

http://www.woodfinishsupply.com/RenWax.html
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[ QUOTE ]
I would highly recommend Renaissance Wax/Polish

[/ QUOTE ]

Totally agree with "Renaissance Wax" for this type of application.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, guys, for the recommendation about the wax and the link to the ordering site. (I got blank looks at the supermarket and Ace Hardware) I figure that if it's good enough for Buckingham Palace, then . . .

I now have to find how to take care of the cartridge boxes and the letter.

I greatly appreciate your replies.

Burr
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Guys,

Thanks very much again for your replies. I've privately received gobs of opinions and the consensus is to keep my grubby hands off of this piece of history and let professionals handle the conservation.

There are many different materials involved: metal, silver-plated metal, wood (the case and wood in cartridge boxes), paper (in the presentation letter and the wrapping of the cartridges boxes), brass, ivory, gunpowder, felt . . . all of which need different methods of preservation.

I've also found a great article on preserving antique firearms:

http://www.mnhs.org/about/publicatio...tember1998.pdf

There's also a Part II to that article, and if anyone's interested I'll find the link. Interesting differentation between restorers and conservators.

Anyway, I'm drafting inquiries to the Smithsonian and a few other similar instutions. BTW, since I've put the colt on the web site, the offers I've received are staggering . . . tempting, but . . .

Thanks again,

Burr
 
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