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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Got a Calvary SAA from 1875, #16414, with a mismatched cylinder from the same year of mfg, cylinder #6590 (16590). Going on the hunch that the cylinder on my gun was swapped out, maybe during cleaning etc, a very long time ago (patina on cylinder matches rest of gun), I thought it would be great if I could find the person who has SAA Colt #16590 and see if we have each other's cylinders. Long shot with multiple assumptions. Much obliged for any leads. Be well,
LarsAK
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The cylinder differing from the other serials is called a "campfire switch' by John Kopec. With the numbers being that close what undoubtedly happened was a switch during cleaning of several guns.
Interesting the "C"asey inspector stamping. Seems to be puckered around the C. Several guns in that serial range were inspected by "L"ewis.
Nice find!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Rick,
Thanks for the good words. Be nice to have been around that campfire...maybe! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Puckered, rusty, or something. Looks her age and like to ensure it makes another 140. Anything besides routing oiling recommended? I saw a similar colt that had been sent back to the factory in the 1950s for "light" restoration and was appropriately marked by colt with the work they'd done. Has a beautiful patina, but many I've talked to tell me not to attempt such restoration on this one. Keep it as is. Just not sure about the rust areas and if they can be spot treated to prevent progression. New to collecting, so any advice appreciated. I found it interesting that the grips were marked with a C too. Since they fit well, I presume they're original to the gun. Seems she's been looked after, but unfortunately spent some time in a humid climate.
 

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I've got the same deal in my 1874 gun, you can tell the cylinder and gun have been together forever. John Kopec looked at it and said the chambers in the cylinder looked like they were unfired. Maybe I can sell it on Gunbroker as an unfired Cavalry revolver, after all I have it in writing.
<a href="http://s13.photobucket.com/user/bearcat6/media/f53c2231-abd5-4e83-8575-e225147cd80f_zpsrehrhnmp.jpg.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a255/bearcat6/f53c2231-abd5-4e83-8575-e225147cd80f_zpsrehrhnmp.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo f53c2231-abd5-4e83-8575-e225147cd80f_zpsrehrhnmp.jpg"/></a>

I don't know what happened to my pic
 

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Several years back I saw a 50 or 60 thousand range (58,000 I believe) 7 1/2 inch that had been sent back to Colt in the 1960's for restoration. It had been inherited, and the new owner wanted to put it back like it was when new. The original wood stocks probably had 90% or better original finish, and the original barrel still had an excellent bore. It appeared that the cylinder had been changed, possibly for safety concerns. The finish was was good, but nothing like the original. The Colt had to have been in really nice condition before the restoration, and once done you cannot go back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Ha! Just a little sarcasm:)
Beautiful gun and a little cartouche showing. Thanks for sharing.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Yep, understand can't go back once started; don't want it new again since bought for the history. Mainly stop the rust that's there, clean it up a little, preserve the patina. Not sure if "just a little" exists in the antique gun world. The one that came back from the colt factory work in the 1950s still looked like a very old gun. Somehow colt removed and/or halted the rust and left a pleasing patina. Craftsmen I suppose.

Several years back I saw a 50 or 60 thousand range (58,000 I believe) 7 1/2 inch that had been sent back to Colt in the 1960's for restoration. It had been inherited, and the new owner wanted to put it back like it was when new. The original wood stocks probably had 90% or better original finish, and the original barrel still had an excellent bore. It appeared that the cylinder had been changed, possibly for safety concerns. The finish was was good, but nothing like the original. The Colt had to have been in really nice condition before the restoration, and once done you cannot go back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Is one of the other, i.e. C Vs L more desireable?

The cylinder differing from the other serials is called a "campfire switch' by John Kopec. With the numbers being that close what undoubtedly happened was a switch during cleaning of several guns.
Interesting the "C"asey inspector stamping. Seems to be puckered around the C. Several guns in that serial range were inspected by "L"ewis.
Nice find!
 
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