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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello, could anyone give me an opinon,on weather this piece would fit comfortably in your early saa collection.it shows about 15% finish,crisp action bore and markings.
the front sight looks altered period time,prob hear in oz, maybe england.the blade has been milled off half its height and a dovetail inletted and the target sight fitted.its 450 eley shipped to london early 1875.
appreciate any comments.
 

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I've never really liked the 7 1/2" versions, but yes I would love to have this one in my collection
 
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does the front sight detract any you think,although done prob 100+ years ago. and what would it be priced at in the states
On older guns originality is everything as far as value goes. That being said, some period modifications don't increase value but do give a firearm a certain aura that doesn't make you cringe when you see them. As for the guns worth, others more knowledgeable than I will comment I'm sure. If it were mine, selling it would be the last thing on my mind.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Tony, that's fascinating,although I'm no expert I'd love to see more pics. Thanks for what you have shown so far. Nick
hear is more picks.
The ring on bottom strap,together with the flap holster is very tipical early australian, and im wondering because the gun is so early, only 3 or so years after the finish of the navy's etc, maybe the origional owner just wanted a front sight just like bead on his navy???
 

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...some period modifications don't increase value but do give a firearm a certain aura that doesn't make you cringe when you see them...

Exactly!! IMO, guns such as these are evidence that people personalized guns to their own tastes, just as we do today. So many times we of today think that people of earlier times should have treated all guns as heirlooms for posterity, which of course is ridiculous. Most were used as tools, as that is what they basically are.

I would cherish this SAA as true piece of early Australian history whereas someone took the time to personalize it to their tastes. A real working gun of a bygone era. Now if only it said Ned Kelly on the inside of the grips!! :p
 
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That is a nice single action and I cringe when I see the front sight because I'm a purist but the truth is that most of the "pure" guns never did anything in their lives but lay in a drawer or on a shelf and weren't really used and personalized like this one.

Not sure what kind of adder or subtracter it is to have been shipped to London (depends on your buying market) but I would say if that was just a standard shipped to the lower 48 states saa, it would bring somewhere in the $5500 upwards range in my area. It's not as early but here is one that was shipped to Meacham in St. Louis in 1886 (going by the serial number the frame was made in 1882) that is similar.

Firearm Gun Revolver Trigger Gun accessory
Firearm Gun Trigger Revolver Gun accessory
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks, all for the nice honest comments it certainly is early australiana, what about the beautiful period flap holster which has been with the gun all its life. the altered front sight is so neat , it would of neally taken a watchmaker to execute
 

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While the shooter in me likes the adjustable sights, the frontier aspect cringes at the delicate nature of the front sight. I'd be afraid of losing the insert in the Outback. Wouldn't be able to have wallaby stew (if I spelled that right:))
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
While the shooter in me likes the adjustable sights, the frontier aspect cringes at the delicate nature of the front sight. I'd be afraid of losing the insert in the Outback. Wouldn't be able to have wallaby stew (if I spelled that right:))
Yep you spelled it right, and yes the stew would be still hot and cooking,because the early ossie's could'nt afford ammo, so you would throw the gun and the dam skippy. i have a low wall baby carbine,that done exactly that during the depression according to the grandson, the old chap ran out of ammo in the old 44,so he finished of the last wallaby,cracking him over the head with the stock.hence a super nice rare and rare winchester became a victom of no ammo left,and cracked stocked round the wrist tang juction. o so sad:(
 

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Everyone keeps saying that sight looks fragile but judging by the wear on the pistol, and the fact it has been on there a very long time it seems to have held up to the use and test of time just fine
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Everyone keeps saying that sight looks fragile but judging by the wear on the pistol, and the fact it has been on there a very long time it seems to have held up to the use and test of time just fine
Indead it has surived the test of time. and it is so delicately customised. as for practicaly use, raise your arm to point of aim,and the ball, perfectly fits the rear notch.
 
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