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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've seen Mr. Ware's writings on "variations" but this seems to be a strange one. Gun serial # is 142XX, with additional # 118 on left side of frame & both grip panels. Early gun with assembly #s, or were the additional #s added later? Reason for question. There are NO caliber markings on gun, which gave me cause to suspect 44 Rem. caliber. Not so. 44WCF drops right in. Visibly, gun has the lanyard ring, pinched post front sight & non-rebated frame. Supposedly, one of these with no caliber markings on frame or trigger guard bow, is going to be 44 Rem. but if it left factory as 44-40, a "44" would be on left side of frame in front of cylinder. Traces of original blue in protected areas. Can find no marks on cylinder. Thought of removing trigger guard & ejector assembly to look for marks but after encountering resistance, I stopped for fear of twisting off a screw head, no matter how well the screw-driver fits. Any input, especially as to year, would be welcome. THANKS!
Plant Air gun Trigger Wood Machine gun
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
P.S. I should have added that top of hammer is rounded, not flat & has the conical firing pin, which seems to appropriately engage with the recoil shield, as she "barks" just fine with blanks, without primer backing out.
 

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I've seen Mr. Ware's writings on "variations" but this seems to be a strange one. Gun serial # is 142XX, with additional # 118 on left side of frame & both grip panels. Early gun with assembly #s, or were the additional #s added later? Reason for question. There are NO caliber markings on gun, which gave me cause to suspect 44 Rem. caliber. Not so. 44WCF drops right in. Visibly, gun has the lanyard ring, pinched post front sight & non-rebated frame. Supposedly, one of these with no caliber markings on frame or trigger guard bow, is going to be 44 Rem. but if it left factory as 44-40, a "44" would be on left side of frame in front of cylinder. Traces of original blue in protected areas. Can find no marks on cylinder. Thought of removing trigger guard & ejector assembly to look for marks but after encountering resistance, I stopped for fear of twisting off a screw head, no matter how well the screw-driver fits. Any input, especially as to year, would be welcome. THANKS! View attachment 754470
This is one thought to be made after Egypt quit paying for the 10,000 that they ordered. So 142XX is the serial number. These serial numbers go up to about 18,000. Then after that, Remington made another 2000, so we think.

Your firing pin may be flat or round. The firing pin may be pinned (as transitionals), although few were.

Yes, the caliber can be on the rear left of barrel, on upper front of frame, on lower front of frame, or on left grip.

Some or all of the SN should be on the trigger guard tab, but I don't blame you for backing away from that tight screw.

I hate to ask, but has someone reamed out the 44 Remington chambers to 44-40? If they did, then the bore is too large for a 44-40. A 44 Remington cartridge is pictured here, and the bullet diameter is close to 0.450".
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
BTW, firing pin is the round cone type & top of hammer is rounded, not flat.
 

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I was under the impression that after the initial run for Egypt in which the serial numbers went up into the 5 digits, that the "batch" numbering began. And each batch number stopped at 1000 and then started over again. I say that because the one I posted in the Part II thread has a 4 digit "batch" number which means it was either Egyptian order, or the batch numbering did not cycle over at 1000. Since the gun is nickel it was NOT for the Egyptian contract so the batch numbering didn't cycle back at 4 digits. Any thoughts on that? Thanks.
Victorio: Firing pin is round and is NOT pinned. Round top hammer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
THEN....from what I read, there was a Mexican contract....then Mexican State Police....then over 600 to U.S. Govt. to be dispersed to various Indian tribal agencies. It appears that they were all nickel & all that I've found out was that only the ones to Pine Ridge were marked "PR" with a rack #. Recently, one appeared on "Broker" that was a re-nickel. The top of the barrel was marked "B.C.A.C.". The butt had a mark that I didn't understand, plus "A.L.L." plus "39". (rack #?). I figure whoever bought it knew something that I couldn't find out about those marks. I googled the "B.C.A.C." for a week, finding no entity or organization that made any sense. Messaged seller. He knew nothing. Perhaps it's still viewable on "Broker" under "completed auctions" & someone in this forum can see it, know what it meant & not tell me because I'll cry!😂
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
BTW, Don Ware's article on variations of the 1875, 1888 & 1890, although very informative, left me scratching my head. At the end of that or his article on Indian Police Remingtons, he furnishes an email address which I tried & it turned out to be "undeliverable". Most are aware that when E. Remington went into receivership & was taken over by Hartley & Graham to become Remington Arms, E. Remington records vanished. Rotten shame!
 

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I think the Mexico, and others, were 45 caliber.
I had one years ago stamped on the butt: USID,
(US Interior Department) along with a number. It was a .44.
Had one in .45 that had a Colt DFC cylinder in it. Someone had drilled the Colt ratchets and center from it and fitted the remington ratches and center to it. It came out of Mexico. Interesting guns.
 

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one of my regrets is when I bought my 1875 Remington from a gun show attendee who told me of the Kentucky lawman who once owned it, that I didn’t write down his name or story. Heck, it even has 2 notches in the wood stocks. She said a price, I said a price and we met in between. Oh well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
One of those stories to file under "sadder, but wiser". Got a bunch of 'em myself. Here's one to make you feel better. I walked away from a badly beat up Colt represented as a "Walker", learning that the serial was already accounted for among the "Walkers" . Found out too late, it was a Whitneyville "transitional" version ....even scarcer than the Walkers. So what if it had no barrel....$500 & I walked away. At least I have a photo.:cry:
Vertebrate Revolver Air gun Trigger Gun barrel
Vertebrate Revolver Air gun Trigger Gun barrel
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
This is one thought to be made after Egypt quit paying for the 10,000 that they ordered. So 142XX is the serial number. These serial numbers go up to about 18,000. Then after that, Remington made another 2000, so we think.

Your firing pin may be flat or round. The firing pin may be pinned (as transitionals), although few were.

Yes, the caliber can be on the rear left of barrel, on upper front of frame, on lower front of frame, or on left grip.

Some or all of the SN should be on the trigger guard tab, but I don't blame you for backing away from that tight screw.

I hate to ask, but has someone reamed out the 44 Remington chambers to 44-40? If they did, then the bore is too large for a 44-40. A 44 Remington cartridge is pictured here, and the bullet diameter is close to 0.450".
Thanks for the info on the 44 Rem! Today using my inertia puller on a live 44-40 round, I discover that on my digital caliper, the bullet measures .425. Next, I measure both guns (the nickel one marked "44" and the blue one with zero markings to discover that they both measure .420 at the muzzle. Don't know if the caliper is accurate but my point is both guns measure the same. Since my blue gun has no caliber marking on the left side of the frame, I'm suspicious that once upon a time "in the west", it may have had it on that left grip which has enough wear that it would be long gone. Both cylinder's chambers measure the same at both ends. So. What conclusion can be made other than wear on the grip obliterating the "44" or the remote possibility that it left Remington originally as a 44 Rem & was returned to be both re-barreled & perhaps a new cylinder which might explain the extra #s on the inside of the grips & the left side of the frame, next to the serial #? I believe I'll go with the wear factor. Thanks again!
 

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I was under the impression that after the initial run for Egypt in which the serial numbers went up into the 5 digits, that the "batch" numbering began. And each batch number stopped at 1000 and then started over again. I say that because the one I posted in the Part II thread has a 4 digit "batch" number which means it was either Egyptian order, or the batch numbering did not cycle over at 1000. Since the gun is nickel it was NOT for the Egyptian contract so the batch numbering didn't cycle back at 4 digits. Any thoughts on that? Thanks.
Victorio: Firing pin is round and is NOT pinned. Round top hammer.
I have made this allegation on ColtForum before, but feel that there will never be a book on the Rem 1875-88-90 series until certain collectors get every variation wanted.

I was a member of RSA for several years, but finally quit them after seeing too many modern guns and an endless article on pocket knives. There were a few articles on the 1875-88-90 series, but very few.

I started a file on this Rem 1875-88-90 series made up from articles written in the last 50 years in various publications. Some of these were older RSA articles.

One of the articles states that the early guns were serial numbered from 1 to about 14,000. But other collectors claim the high number to be more like 18,000. My reaction is -- can't they even get this right??? I mean, how hard is it to take a survey and report the highest number seen?

One article says that after the 18000 were made, that 2000 more were made in this serial range. Again, echo my call for a survey above.

One article covers the changing hammer styles, but does little to tie these variations to serial numbers or other features.

I know that there is a private survey being done on the 1888 model. One thing being collected is the assembly number on the barrel and ejector housing. It is thought that the highest assembly number will finally reveal the total number of these made. I also heard that this number will be less than 1000.
 

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Thanks for the info on the 44 Rem! Today using my inertia puller on a live 44-40 round, I discover that on my digital caliper, the bullet measures .425. Next, I measure both guns (the nickel one marked "44" and the blue one with zero markings to discover that they both measure .420 at the muzzle. Don't know if the caliper is accurate but my point is both guns measure the same. Since my blue gun has no caliber marking on the left side of the frame, I'm suspicious that once upon a time "in the west", it may have had it on that left grip which has enough wear that it would be long gone. Both cylinder's chambers measure the same at both ends. So. What conclusion can be made other than wear on the grip obliterating the "44" or the remote possibility that it left Remington originally as a 44 Rem & was returned to be both re-barreled & perhaps a new cylinder which might explain the extra #s on the inside of the grips & the left side of the frame, next to the serial #? I believe I'll go with the wear factor. Thanks again!
I think that the 118 on the frame and grips was an issue number (maybe a badge number). Since any serial number on these is under the grips, the using agencies sometimes assigned numbers and stamped them externally. Shown here is a M1890 with SN 1350. Some agency added "1350" to the bottom of the frame and butt. This time the assigned number matched the SN.
 

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Thanks for the info on the 44 Rem! Today using my inertia puller on a live 44-40 round, I discover that on my digital caliper, the bullet measures .425. Next, I measure both guns (the nickel one marked "44" and the blue one with zero markings to discover that they both measure .420 at the muzzle. Don't know if the caliper is accurate but my point is both guns measure the same. Since my blue gun has no caliber marking on the left side of the frame, I'm suspicious that once upon a time "in the west", it may have had it on that left grip which has enough wear that it would be long gone. Both cylinder's chambers measure the same at both ends. So. What conclusion can be made other than wear on the grip obliterating the "44" or the remote possibility that it left Remington originally as a 44 Rem & was returned to be both re-barreled & perhaps a new cylinder which might explain the extra #s on the inside of the grips & the left side of the frame, next to the serial #? I believe I'll go with the wear factor. Thanks again!
Your two guns probably have 5 lands and grooves.

"Both cylinder's chambers measure the same at both ends" sounds like they are both 44 Remington. The 44 Remington is almost a straight through bore, but should have a slight taper.
 
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I've got a two digit serial blue 1875 with a pinched front sight and caliber marking on the left grip







My understanding was the caliber marking went from the grip to the frame flat and last to the trigger guard with early front sights being pinched followed by a blade.

I've always liked the 1875 with its distinctive profile. The blue example above has "Arch Stanton 1937" carved inside on one of the grips.
 

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I've got a two digit serial blue 1875 with a pinched front sight and caliber marking on the left grip







My understanding was the caliber marking went from the grip to the frame flat and last to the trigger guard with early front sights being pinched followed by a blade.

I've always liked the 1875 with its distinctive profile. The blue example above has "Arch Stanton 1937" carved inside on one of the grips.
Does your blued gun have a flat or round firing pin?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I've got a two digit serial blue 1875 with a pinched front sight and caliber marking on the left grip







My understanding was the caliber marking went from the grip to the frame flat and last to the trigger guard with early front sights being pinched followed by a blade.

I've always liked the 1875 with its distinctive profile. The blue example above has "Arch Stanton 1937" carved inside on one of the grips.
GREAT SHOTS! Especially enjoyed seeing the grip markings! THANKS!
 
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