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Discussion Starter #1
Just curious if anyone has any experience with these. They aren't cheap, but a relative of mine had one hog hunting over easter and it was highly effective on the biggest pest/source of agriculture damage in Texas and I was curious about looking into one.

There is an old 1886 45-70 I have my eye on but it is in fairly rough shape, and the guy selling it wants about what a 475 would run me.

Anyway, was just curious if anyone had any experience with one of these as I never got the chance to shoot his, but I saw the quite effective results first hand.

https://www.turnbullrestoration.com/gun/turnbull-model-1886/
 

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Discussion Starter #3
They have lowered thee price according to my cousing. His was $4500 and he got it brand new from them in February. Took 4 months to make it.

The winchester is 4k. Geez 1886s are pricey.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Jim, yeah I have seen the henrys. I have thought about getting a turnbull off and on, but his custom gund usually don't grab me. This 475 has however....
 

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I've got a few custom Browning and Winchester '86s. 45/70, three in 45/90, 50 Alaskan and 50/110. Only unmolested '86 I own is a Browning carbine. Dang near bought another one yesterday :bang_wall: If a Browning carbine is something you'd consider send me a PM and I'll let you know where a clean one is. Of all my '86s is is likely the most user friendly at the get go and needs no mods. . No .475 although I do have 40 rounds of Turnbull's brass for one.

My take on it after decades of owning '86's is stick to the 45/70. Full length, full mag '86 is a big heavy gun in any caliber including the .50s. . Carbines ar about right fro size and weight. The LWT short mag tube '86s even with a shot gun butt is a man killer with heavy loads. Nothing in North America that a hot 45/70 or 45/90 won't hammer down and shoot all the way through with one well placed shot and the right bullet.

Harold Johnson developed the 50 Alaskan from 348 brass to use in a '86 or '71 and big bear. In a later interview Mr. Johnson said he'd never have bothered if 45-90 brass had been easily available in the '50s. 50-100 is even more. But bullets are limited in the .50 or 475 for that matter. Lots of premium lever gun bullets available for .45.

My suggestion before jumping on a Turnbull .475 is shoot a few '86's (different models, long or short barrels, lwt pencil barrels, a thin carbine or heavy octagon barrels) and figure out what you really want. Likely better than having half dozen '86's sitting in the safe :)

A few of what I have or have had built. And no tang safety on any of them! Good luck in your search!








 

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As far as I know, the pricing on Turnbull "built to order" 1886's includes the base gun, a new production Winchester. The rebounding hammer is removed for a traditional half cock action and the tang safety is removed and welded up.

My only issue with it are the bullets available for the .475. You have a plethora of cast bullets but even the hardest, best heat treated cast bullets show their limitations when velocity creeps above 1300fps. At 2000fps, anything can happen. If I was going bigger than the .45-70, I would get a .50AK or .50-110.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I spoke with them today to see what pricing would be like on the following


full octagon 26" barrel
full mag tube
smooth wood-may get checkered in future but budgets are what they are.
Non takedown
Iron sights
Straight stock
Shotgun pad
Mercury recoil reducer(I am still debting this as I have never had any experience with one to know if they are effective or not.
Upgrade 4x wood

Its a 9lb gun, which isn't lite, but I have hunted pheasant with a 10.5 lb parker before so it isn't that bad.

Price wasn't as bad as expected. They have lowered their prices from what they told me in the email.

Still debating. He did mention though that if I supplied my own action, the price became significantly cheaper. May have to see if that 1920 1886 action is still in my buddies project box....
 

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Obviously a big fan of the '86. The conversation gave me an excuse to pull out the 45-90s.

All are 22" barrels that were rechambered to 45/90.

Top one is a deluxe Winchester LWT. Safety was welded up, reblued and rechambered. Weight is 7.62#

Middle is a Browning '86 SRC. Only modes are a trigger job and rechambered to 45-90. Weight is 7.68# (one ounce more than the LWT version) And by far the best balanced gun of the bunch with or without ammo.

Obviously a full mag on a 26" rifle is gonna pack some weight by comparison to a half mag LWT.

Bottom is a Deluxe Winchester, SGB/PG/TD with an extra inch on the LOP @ 14.25". Weight is 9.5#

 

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Discussion Starter #15
I got into a conversation with an older gentleman who used to do predator control for TPWD here in Texas. He loves old winchesters and advised looking at getting a takedown rifle?

I am not familiar with the rifle version, I own several side x sides so I can see the advantage offered, but there seems to be a premium on takedowns?
 

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First time I saw a 38-55 and a 45 Colt I thought they were huge ;) Then I thought the 458 Win mag was big until I started shooting a 458 Lott and then a 505 Gibbs.

Here are some lever gun loads for comparison.

I didn't have a 475 bullet so I made do. Interesting that less than a full wrap of masking tape kept the .45 bullet from going into the .475 case. Lots of premium 400 gr. .45 bullets available for a lever gun.

Both Turnbull cartridges are based on rimmed, bottle-neck cases withdiminutive shoulders and use .475" diameter bullets. (which has all been done before up to .50 cal.) The .475 is based on whatis essentially a blown-out, necked-up .348 Winchester case. The .348 was itselfbased on a shortened (2.25") and necked-down version of the longer (2.4") .50-110 Winchester case. The .470 is also based on the .348 case. MAP isspecified as 42,000 psi for the SAAMI standardized .475 and about 40,000 psi for the .470, which has not been SAAMI certified.

Left to Right 45-90, 45-75, 475 Turnbull, 45-70, 38-55, 30-30.


.475 Turnbull

  • 350 grain bullet - MV 2300 fps; ME 4110 ft. lbs.
  • 400 grain bullet - MV 2150 fps; ME 4104 ft. lbs.
  • 450 grain bullet - MV 2050 fps; ME 4198 ft. lbs.
  • 500 grain bullet - MV 1900 fps; ME 4007 ft. lbs.
.470 Turnbull

  • 350 grain bullet - MV 2010 fps; ME 3140 ft. lbs.
  • 400 grain bullet - MV 1850 fps; ME 3040 ft. lbs.
  • 450 grain bullet - MV 1725 fps; ME 2973 ft. lbs.
A modern steel 1886 in
45-70 can push a 400 gr bullet @ 1950fps
45-90, 400gr @ 2000fps
450 Alaska (348 Case as well) 400gr @ 2250fps
50-110, 450gr @ 1750fps

I don't have my 50-110, 50 Alaskan, or the hot 45-90 loads handy or I'd pass that along as well. Not a lot of difference between any of them on game given the same bullet designs and speed ( from all reports) until you hit the big 50s.

Not much holds up well to a .50.

I will say this from experience. Bring your big boy pants and a good pad if you plan on shooting a lot of heavy, fast 400gr bullets. And a glove on your lever hand isn't a bad idea either.

I built or had built a number of big bore lever guns to carry in on the Alaskan Coastline. But ended up building and using bolt guns in .505 which made more sense to me at the time. .505, 600gr at 2200fps and 525gr at 2300fps as I recall. A hand full to shoot in 8# rifles.

505 and a 45



two more in Kevlar


Left to Right

505 Gibbs @ 525gr, 505/416 Rigby @ 600gr, 475 Turnbull @ 400gr.




Bit of history here

https://www.gunsinternational.com/guns-for-sale-online/rifles/winchester-rifles-model-71/rare-harold-johnson-kenai-winchester-model-71-lever-action-450-alaskan-cal-rifle-circa-late-1950-s-.cfm?gun_id=100980595

https://www.24hourcampfire.com/ubbthreads/ubbthreads.php/topics/12455147/model-71-wildcats-hunting-in-canada-alaska
 

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Kingcobb said:
I got into a conversation with an older gentleman who used to do predator control for TPWD here in Texas. He loves old winchesters and advised looking at getting a takedown rifle?

I am not familiar with the rifle version, I own several side x sides so I can see the advantage offered, but there seems to be a premium on takedowns?

Interesting opinion. Be nice to discuss with him as to why he thought a TD model was of interest. My Grandfather was also a advocate of TD Winchester rifles and shotguns. I have both and don't see the advantage unless you were traveling back in the day where a TD would be easier to haul around.

Just spent a few minutes going through 5 pages of GB 1886 listings. Pretty impressive the different models of the 1886s Miroku has put out. I sure don't need another '86 but there are a lot of different Models of them available to choose from if you wanted to build the project dream gun. Which got me thinking and I was looking at the Browning 1886 as a basis for another project gun. Which dropped me down another rabbit hole and I found this one. Oh, my :) I need one of these!

 
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