Colt Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Until I can get into the classified section, trying to learn values in hopes of someday getting my first SAA. I see this auction ended at $1800- so about $2300 with shipping and house premium. Since the floor for buying a SAA in any condition seems to be around $2000, the auction looked interesting to me.

https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/81532983_colt-single-action-army-nickel-plated-revolver

What do you think of this gun at that price?

Does a letter go with the frame, guard, or backstrap serial number in a mismatched gun? (or just wishful thinking)?

Thanks for your feedback!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,210 Posts
Buy Kopec's Single Action books and actually read them - doing that will save you a ton of money, and will keep you far away from refinished stuff like this.

Then, go to some 'good', high-dollar shows, and actually look at what a quality SAA should look like, before you even entertain a thought about buying.

Following that, buy from a dealer in the field - you may pay a bit more, but you'll get full value.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Buy Kopec's Single Action books and actually read them - doing that will save you a ton of money, and will keep you far away from refinished stuff like this.

Then, go to some 'good', high-dollar shows, and actually look at what a quality SAA should look like, before you even entertain a thought about buying.

Following that, buy from a dealer in the field - you may pay a bit more, but you'll get full value.
Thanks. I've bought the "textbook" and yes it's worth every penny. Looking forward to the Denver gun show if it's not cancelled. It's really hard to find reasonable priced examples to put my grubby hands and eyes to. Back to the gun, I get that it's a mish-mash, over polished, re-finished (and I have a personal aversion to nickel guns), over/fake stamped, rough, etc...BUT it's got some real parts, BP frame, and a lettered backstrap (what's that worth?) and most importantly it's at the bottom of the price range IMHO- if it locks up it's got potential as a shooter and entry level gun I'd enjoy in my safe. I understand gun collecting works best when buying the best all original example, but sometimes the ugly but cheapest house in the neighborhood sells the fastest at a surprising price. Perhaps I should have put a survey with the options; Overpriced POS wouldn't keep it my safe, It's worth $1000 in parts, or I'd ask to look at it in a pawn shop. I'll have to get back to the book since there's very few physical examples for me to look at in the $2000 range.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
Does a letter go with the frame, guard, or backstrap serial number in a mismatched gun? (or just wishful thinking)?

Thanks for your feedback!
To answer your original question, the letter should go with the frame serial number. That appears to be in the 71XXX range, if this is a true artillery model, all the parts usually are mismatched. As Rick pointed out, the letter in the auction listing is for the back strap (BS) and would indicate information for the original cavalry model that the BS was on. Ruster has mentioned that for the cavalry/artillery model with this serial number on the BS, probably from the Springfield Research Records, was assigned to a particular artillery unit. There is a true artillery model out there with the frame serial number of 133315 that would be very desirable because of this information.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
They lettered the BS? Seriously?
With at least 3 different serial numbers, why not get a letter for any and all serial numbers? I'm only half joking as the gambler in me wonders what are the odds that one of the letters is interesting enough to pay off. No need to keep the disappointing letters.... If this auction sold for more than "the market", how much of the premium is due to a lettered back strap? I'm guessing enough casual bidders saw a US Government "letter" and threw in another $100 driving the price up and paying off the letter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
If this is a true artillery, all the parts would be military and likely all the letters would say the same thing, shipped to the government. The only "exciting" information would come from other sources, like the Springfield Research Records and that information is more difficult to obtain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Okay but HOW MUCH do I have to save up?
I just had another look at Gunbroker completed sales for NIB SAA and it looks like there are plenty of sales in the $1800-$2200 range. To an amateur like myself, this seems about 10%+ cheaper than a year or two ago. Again, IMHO there are more online examples to choose from at better prices- especially compared to a few years ago- but still sparse local supply to see in person.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'm confused. What are you looking to buy? Colt SAA 1st 2nd or 3rd Gen? Civilian or military? Artillery or Cavalry?
Hi Rick,
Thanks for the interest. Please don't be confused by my confusion. I'm looking for Custer's Cavalry- but I'm on an Uberti budget. Truth is I like them all (from my EIC flintlock to my stainless Vaquero). Of course my preference would be a 1st gen with some interesting history. Right now I've got a lot to learn so that, hopefully someday, when I run into a "can't pass up" deal I'll know enough to make a good investment. I can get the bosses approval if I present a good investment argument. I know enough now to know it's a minefield out there top to bottom including Wilson fakes, etc. I'm also looking to reach the magic 15 posts so I'm asking for tolerance of my posts and in the percussion forum and please go easy on me as a scatterbrained newbie.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,210 Posts
What you're looking for is what everybody's looking for...

Read - refine your search parameters - read some more, then ask intelligent questions.

You're going to find that provenance is expensive.

You're also going to find that the bulk of SAAs went to hardware stores in the mid-west - then on to their eventual destination, but unless someone can prove this, the Colt information stops at the loading dock.

Get a nest egg of three grand or so - good pieces 'can' be found for less, but remember the old adage - 'Money Talks and BS Walks', so you'd best be prepared...

Also - buy for enjoyment and not 'investment', because when you have to sell it, you won't recoup what you think you will.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
What you're looking for is what everybody's looking for...

Read - refine your search parameters - read some more, then ask intelligent questions.

You're going to find that provenance is expensive.

You're also going to find that the bulk of SAAs went to hardware stores in the mid-west - then on to their eventual destination, but unless someone can prove this, the Colt information stops at the loading dock.

Get a nest egg of three grand or so - good pieces 'can' be found for less, but remember the old adage - 'Money Talks and BS Walks', so you'd best be prepared...

Also - buy for enjoyment and not 'investment', because when you have to sell it, you won't recoup what you think you will.
Thanks. Appreciate the advice and voice of experience.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,542 Posts
My serial number list shows that this gun (SN 133315) was assigned to the 2nd US Artillery as of 10/17/1900. I'm continually amazed that so few people use the list to see if there is info about a particular 1st Generation Colt.

Rusty Edwards
Ruster, what list are you referring to?
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top