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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i am new here. I recently received an 1891 Colt SAA revolver and an 1877 Colt Lightning (mfg 1886) as an inheritance. I do not know much about these, so i took them to a local gun shop and he would buy them from me for $1300.
But I figured i would come on here and get your opinion on these. The 1891 does come with a colt letter.
I would appreciate any feedback thank you
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Andy, welcome to the club. If your dealer offered you $1300 for the pair, I would run to get out of there. The SAA alone should be worth around $2500 or so. It does have the wrong grips on it and it looks like the trigger has been replaced. Can't speak to the value of the 1877, but most that I have seen are going for at least a thousand or so. Better pics would give the guys here that are more knowledgeable a better chance at determining value. Keep in mind it also depends on where you arre located as prices will vary around the country. Good luck.
 

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Not saying the gun shop was out to rip you off, but they certainly will take advantage of a firearm owner who isn’t knowledgeable about the items. Plus they have to make a profit.

The SAA in 38-40 will bring 2500-3000 in today’s market and the little 1877 may do as well as the 1300 they offered you.
You need to be patient is all for the right buyer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Andy, welcome to the club. If your dealer offered you $1300 for the pair, I would run to get out of there. The SAA alone should be worth around $2500 or so. It does have the wrong grips on it and it looks like the trigger has been replaced. Can't speak to the value of the 1877, but most that I have seen are going for at least a thousand or so. Better pics would give the guys here that are more knowledgeable a better chance at determining value. Keep in mind it also depends on where you arre located as prices will vary around the country. Good luck.
thank you
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Not saying the gun shop was out to rip you off, but they certainly will take advantage of a firearm owner who isn’t knowledgeable about the items. Plus they have to make a profit.

The SAA in 38-40 will bring 2500-3000 in today’s market and the little 1877 may do as well as the 1300 they offered you.
You need to be patient is all for the right buyer.
Thank you
 

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Your making me jittery just thinking you could have done that . Those two pistols aren't going any were , sit on them a while and check around the net for comparison . Unless your hell bent on selling your inheritance ?
 

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I have a SAA that was shipped out 11 days after yours in 1891 that I inherited a while back and had a similar experience with a gun shop. At the time I knew very little about these amazing firearms and they offered me a fraction of what it was worth. These guys here know their stuff to say the least, you will get excellent honest information from multiple experts here. Mine will stay in the family and go to my son some day. Thanks for sharing your pistols it’s great to see one so close to mine.
 

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I'm thinking , with the letter framed and the SAA on a pillow , they won't be sold today :) . Looks like a start for a good new hobby . That lighting is pretty cool . (y)
 

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Stocks look correct for 1891 and there is enough blue remaining in the recesses of the TG and Barrel etc that the trigger may be right as well - also, I believe LAB's assessment of value is accurate.

Nice SAA!
 

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The trigger on the SAA is sitting a bit too far forwards for being at rest. The hammer or trigger may be damaged. Without having the gun in hand I can only guess at this. If there is a problem it is a 300 dollar repair in most cases. The hammer and trigger are both prone to breaking on these guns. As stated the grips do not fit correctly, at least the right side. The rest of the gun looks very good for a 5 percent to a no finish gun. Being built in 1891 makes it an antique by law and in many states it is legal to sell without any paperwork. It cam also be mailed to many states. This adds value to the gun. The 2500 to 3000 estimate is a good one. This would be retail price and not selling to a dealer who expects to resell the gun for profit.

The 1877 is one of the more common models and is not in very good condition with just a few traces of finish. These guns are also very often encountered in not working condition. They are a lot harder to get parts for. The prices on these have gone up and down over the last few years. It to is an antique dating to 1886. While these guns are desirable they are not as desirable as the big Colt. I am thinking it is in the 800 to 1200 dollar range. If one is careful they could find a better gun for just a little more so yours is not cream of the crop while any 1891 SAA in original condition is highly sought after.
 

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Those are fine guns to have inherited, and if I were you, would not sell either of them if the person who you inherited them from was close to you and you also are interested in guns.
 

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gun stores need a profit, but that is scandalous
It looks like they offered a right at 50% offer for what those guns would have been worth a little over a year ago. If they haven't kept up with the current state of affairs in Colts that's about right for a brick and mortar store to put in their inventory. When a dealer buys a gun, he assumes all the risk of selling and any problems it might have whilst hoping to make a profit. Realistically right now, unless a gun store owns their own building bought decades ago, most of the profit on selling goes to rent and operating expenses.
 

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It looks like they offered a right at 50% offer for what those guns would have been worth a little over a year ago. If they haven't kept up with the current state of affairs in Colts that's about right for a brick and mortar store to put in their inventory. When a dealer buys a gun, he assumes all the risk of selling and any problems it might have whilst hoping to make a profit. Realistically right now, unless a gun store owns their own building bought decades ago, most of the profit on selling goes to rent and operating expenses.
I want the LGS to survive too.
If those guns would likely sell for $3500+/- then $1300 is not a fair offer
 

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andyp1961, by now you've probably realized the wise decision you made in joining the Forum. The folks here are expert in their knowledge, and generous with good advice. Welcome !
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thank you all. Good information. I'll keep them for now. Is there a special gunsmith that works on these. I would want to fix the 191 trigger
 

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I wouldn't jump the gun on spending money on the trigger/hammer without more research. Perhaps you could take photos showing the hammer and trigger positions in three different locations.

Before starting these checks make sure the gun is unloaded. (See my note below.)

There are three positions when cocking the hammer: the first click/position is the safety notch. It will engage with only maybe 1/8" to 1/4" movement of the hammer. With LIGHT pressure on the trigger in this position it should hold and not let the hammer fall. I say light pressure because pulling too hard on the trigger WILL break it or the hammer notch.

The second click/notch/position will be the half-cock position and it will be about half way of the hammers travel. In this position the cylinder should be free to rotate. Again, with LIGHT pressure on the trigger in this position the hammer should hold and not release. I say light pressure because pulling too hard on the trigger WILL break it or the hammer notch.

When the hammer is pulled back as far as it will go the trigger should click into place and hold the hammer at full cock, ready to fire. With moderate pressure on the trigger the hammer should release and fall all the way and hit the frame. I say moderate since too light of a trigger pull is not safe and too heavy is not desirable.

NOTE: I guess I need to say to not do these checks with the gun loaded or with anything in the chambers of the cylinder.

If you find you do need a gunsmith there are several good ones that the forum members will recommend.

One more suggestion: When cocking the hammer and releasing it from the safety notch or the half notch always pull the hammer back as far as it will go, hold it in this position with your thumb and pull the trigger back. You can now lower the hammer slowly all the way down to the frame. This procedure will index the cylinder in the correct rotational place and prevent scratching the surface of the cylinder.

Hope this helps.
 
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