Colt Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey there everyone! New to the forum and relatively new to Colts so this site has been a huge help.
I just picked up this 1892 New Army ser. no. 2083. It has plain Walnut grips (hand written numbers to match on the backs). First question: are these a factory supplied items?
Also stamped on the breech end of the cylinder, just above the left grip on the frame and on the bottom of that grip is RAC. Anyone know what that's indicating?
The grips also have a professionally looking stamp with initials in a box and the year 1898 above that. Any help on it's provenience would greatly be appreciated.
I'd say blueing is about 30% with patina on the rest, no real pitting to speak about and grips are solid with very minor chips at the edges. I paid $275 Canadian at an auction...did I do alright?


Blair
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
671 Posts
Re: 1892 New Army

Please let us know what markings are on the butt of the gun ~ that information will reveal a lot about this revolver. Also, it would be helpful if you could say what the last patent date on the barrel is; It should be November 6th, 1888.

I have a M-1892 s/n 2024 that has been seriously "mickeyed" with. However, in spite of its refinish, later 7.5"barrel and stupid and crudely installed rear target sight, remains an unaltered (by the US Army) M-1892. Alas the grips were also refinished and lost all their markings. I'm puzzled by the 1898 date on yours, but then I'm not an expert on the Military versions of the New Army/New Navy double actions, but at $CAN275.00, I'd have jumped at it.

Congratulations on your Colt M-1892, and welcome to this forum where you'll find all sorts of great information and cameraderie.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Re: 1892 New Army

Here's some pics of gun in question. I don't think the RAC could be inspector initials as I've never seen them put on grips. The fancy initials look like TMJ but could be PMT. Thanks so far with the comments. B




[image]
[/image] [image]
[/image] [image]
[/image] [image]
[/image]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
671 Posts
Re: 1892 New Army

jacobtowne is exactly right about the RAC being inspector Rinaldo A Carr's initials, and they are indeed to be found on the butt of rhe grips on these double actions.

Your gun has some problems unfortunately as all markings have been removed from the butt ~ there should be the U.S. Army model year plus the serial number stamped there. As the last patent date on the barrel is the MAR. 5. 95. (March 5, 1895) date, this weapon is very probably a U.S.Army Model 1894. The number (2083) on the cylinder release latch is the assembly number, not the serial number, and should be repeated on the crane, the crane cut in the frame and on the back of the cylinder.

If the barrel is original, then the serial number has been well and truly lost (as mentioned, it was on the butt) and 2083 is far too low a number to have the March 5, 1895 date.

I'd say you have a U.S. Army Model of 1894, indeterminate serial number, with some rather nice grips. Still a good gun for the price paid, and a good starting place for a collection, as there is much that can be learned from it.

Maybe COLTDAGUY will chime in and give you some better information than this. He is the acknowledged expert on these guns, and has recently published a first class book on them.

All the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,386 Posts
Re: 1892 New Army

Hi Zulu6,

Thanks for the kind words! You are correct, the gun is a Model 1894 and the correct serial number would be (10)2083. You can deduce this from the known contract range of the third contract that this gun came from. The correct acceptance initials on the left grip is DMT for Captain David M. Taylor. Ranaldo A. Carr's RAC initials should be on the face of the right grip panel in script. All of the RAC initials are Ranaldo A. Carr's... he was the civilian sub-inspector for the Army contracts of the Model 1892 Model 1894 and Model 1901 revolvers.

This gun (10)2083 was shipped in July 1898. Hope that helps. Bob Best
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top