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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A friend of mine has 2 1903's. One has what appears to be a FP bushing that's loose and protrudes from the breach face. It can be pushed back in but is an obvious problem as the case rims catch on it as they feed.
Schematic pics do not show a bushing. Is this a repair gone bad done somewhere in the past?
 

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Without a clear picture it's hard to diagnose but there is no "bushing" associated with the firing pin(s). FOUR components are 1) Front firing pin 2) Rear firing pin 3) Firing Pin Spring 4) Firing pin Lock Pin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm working on getting some pictures. If he doesn't come up with pics soon I'll do it.

Thanks, Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for replies and special thanks for pic of FP assm.. I will post pics as soon as I can. I jumped the gun and started the thread without pics thinking maybe this was a known or at least experienced by someone issue.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
O.K. Here's the scoop. Walt is the owner of the 2 1903's and machinist extraordinaire. Walt took the gun to a local gunsmith and between them they figured it out. All these guns have bushings pressed in from the front until they're flush with the breach face. The firing pin channel was drilled from the front. The two piece FP is necessary so the FP can be replaced. Walt will remove the bushing and make a new one, or maybe knurl the old one and use it. I took these pics and you can see it. One slide has the bushing sticking out. The second slide is still in tact but you can see the outline of the bushing on the face

 

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Neat-O. I learned something new today.

Thanks!
 

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The question is why did someone feel it necessary to add the bushing pictured? I suspect the firing pin hole was off center originally, and the bushing was the fix. Any other ideas?

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.")
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
The thinking is the bushing is present on all 1903's. There's no way too drill the firing pin channel from the rear, It's enclosed by the slide rear. The firing pin channel was drilled from the front during mfg., through the slide barrel opening. Then the bushing pressed in. The bushing was never expected to wear out so no references to it on schematic parts breakdowns. In the pic below you can see the slide rear (black) is directly in line with the pin hole (red)

 

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When I made my first reply, I had a feeling that perhaps I should check my examples to see if they have the bushing (a bushing that would seem unnecessary). My instinct was right. Apparently, ALL Model M pistols have the bushings! All of mine do. (Why Colt thought the bushing necessary remains a puzzle.)

On the offending pistol with the loose bushing, I would knick up the outside of the bushing to raise some metal and drive it back in place, perhaps with some red Loctite for good measure.

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.")
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
On the offending pistol with the loose bushing, I would knick up the outside of the bushing to raise some metal and drive it back in place, perhaps with some red Loctite for good measure.

(Apologies to anyone offended by my "delivery.")
I spent 40 mins. at Walts place trying to remove that bushing with hemostats. The thing turns 180 degrees freely but what ever Colt used to hold it would not allow it to come out more than 1/16". Walt had to sic his dog on me to keep me from throwing the slide out into the street. At 67 I've grown impatient.
I talked to Walt last night and he in fact arrived at the same repair approach. He had a heck of a time driving the bushing back flush with the face. I would have liked to see that thing removed as maybe it's a "tube" affair enclosing the entire front FP assm. Test fire is today or tomorrow.
I'm a revolver guy, these automatic things with all their jimcracks and doohickies will never catch on.
 

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The hardened bushing is to prevent wear and battering of the breech face. The old Colt autos had no heat treatment and the slides were soft. While it had already been used in the Pocket Hammerless pistols, it was not used on the military 1911A1 until 1937.

I recently looked at a Model 1917 Colt that the bushing was missing from. A dangerous situation if someone had fired the revolver without the bushing.
 

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Test fire is today or tomorrow.
I'm a revolver guy, these automatic things with all their jimcracks and doohickies will never catch on.
You revolver guy's keep going in circles! Let us know how the test works out.
 
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I learn something new every day.
I'm gonna go look at all of mine right now.
I would be likely to seat the thing flush and stake it, and then clean it up with a stone or some such.
I'm sure Colt never expected that thing to herniate.
 

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On Revolvers, the Hardened 'disc' is called the 'Recoil Plate' I think....rather than that it is a 'Bushing'.

It is a thin 'Washer' in effect, open in the center for the Firing Pin to come through, thus supporting the Shell Casing's Head on detonation/recoil.
 

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It is also correctly called a recoil plate on the autos, but the thread got started on "bushing" and no one was confused by the term. It is a hardened bushing that serves as a recoil plate.
 

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It is also correctly called a recoil plate on the autos, but the thread got started on "bushing" and no one was confused by the term. It is a hardened bushing that serves as a recoil plate.

Are you saying that the 'Bushing' is properly/formally called a 'Recoil Plate' in the Colt-Browning .32 and .380 Autos?
 

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Are you saying that the 'Bushing' is properly/formally called a 'Recoil Plate' in the Colt-Browning .32 and .380 Autos?
Yes. It serves to prevent peening around the firing pin hole brought about by recoil of the cartridge against the breech face.
 
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