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Sounds like it and we all learned something. First the "insert" on the breech face isn't diagramed with the firing pin "assembly" (I use assembly due to the 4 parts). Perhaps it is in blueprints as part of the slide as shown in Brunner's book on Page 8 (Fig 6) there is a callout for a ".218-32 NS-3" exactly where that piece would be. Interesting stuff. Unfortunately the parts list isn't included, due to proprietary stuff, I'm assuming :)
 

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The recoil plate was considered an integral part of the slide, and would not show up. The firing pin is removed by drifting out the transverse pin in the slide serrations. The pin goes through a notch in the back part of the firing pin, holding everything in place.

That said, I don't take them any farther apart than field stripping.
 

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The recoil plate was considered an integral part of the slide, and would not show up........
While it may be considered as such there is a blueprint of the slide and the dimensions and then an assembly drawing/blueprint with a detailed parts list. I strongly suspect the assembly drawing will have the "recoil plate" as we're now referring to it, as a part, since they had to assemble that into the slide. The details of assembly are then a separate document that would typically been found in manufacturing, separate from engineering. Each and every piece of the pistol HAS to have a part drawing replete with dimensions and tolerances. I spent over 30 years in design and engineering specializing in CAD/CAM, though more on the CAD side of the business.

To recap: Part drawing, sub assembly drawing (occasional), assembly drawing with parts list(and related part number to reference BACK to the part drawing) - all at the design and engineering level. You hit the "floor" (manufacturing) and that's a whole other world where assemblers on each station have their instructions, all coordinated like a ballet.
 

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There is certainly no disagreement that the recoil plate would have to show up on a blueprint. The recoil plate as well as the slide would have to be dimensioned to allow a press fit, and when pressed into the slide the recoil plate became an integral part of the slide.

Maybe I just don't remember it, but I don't ever recall seeing the recoil plate show on a parts breakdown.
 

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In the interest of trying to help ,It is imposable to drill the firing pin cavity from the back of the slide(it has to be done from the front barrel end)I dont know if any drill bit that will pass through a small hole and expand to a larger size .Hence a plug or bushing is needed to reduce the hole to retain the firing pin and keep it from falling out of its cavity . J.M.Browning devised a 2 piece firing pin that could be installed from the rear of the slide . A 1 piece firing pin could not make a bend to fit into the cavity from the rear .The bushing was installed and not designed to be taken out that is why it is not shown on any parts breakdown.
To sum it up if you look at and think about what was done this makes things fall into place. In my slide the bushing moves front to back @i/16 "I think i will have to machine it out and make another to rep;ace it ,lock tite and press it in and don't know about staking it because the breach face must be smooth for the back of the rim to slide on without hanging up.
On many European guns the hole WAS drilled from the back and a plug was welded in the back end of slide.
Hope this clears up some misconceptions It's not a recoil plate it is a bushing
Thanks POPEYE for your help
 

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This is a photo of the hardened recoil plate in a 1911A1 slide made in 1937, the first year the recoil plate was used in the .45 service pistol. It was originally pressed in, but changed to threaded shortly after being added to the 1911A1. After WWII the slides were fully hardened, and as no longer needed the recoil plate was eliminated.

 

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The reason i don't call it a recoil plate is that it is just a bit larger than the primer .It seems that the back if the shell has more area to contact the slide than just the primer area Also isn't the rear of the shell against the breach and being spring loaded the slide would move with the slightest PUSH from the shell?This is not a locked breach gun like the 1911
 

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It wasn't just the primer. From Clawson:

"Colt had discovered that the striking of the cartridge case against the breech face of the slide at the instant of recoil caused a peening around the firing pin hole after prolonged usage. Flame hardening was likely to warp the thin sides of the slide near the ejection port, therefore, the simple logical solution was to replace the affected area with a plug of hardened steel in the same manner as in the earlier revolvers."

But, I respect your right to call it anything you like.
 

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I am just trying to reason it out I know that the F.P.channel had to be drilled from the front in the 1903 thus a bushing (shield )HAD to be installed .The 1911 has more energy than the 32 cal. Your quote is about the 1911 or all the automatics? I have several 1910 Mauser 32's that don 't have bushings .
 
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