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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can someone kindly explain the Cincinnati Trust marking on a Colt 1909.
Need some help, please:
1. Were CTC Colts ALL Army surplus pistols ?
2. Should all CTC pistols have serial number penciled on inside of grips ?
3. Generally, should all 1909 with Army marking on butt, have serial number penciled on grips ?
4. What is the exact marking "CTC", or "CTCo" or what ?
5. Should the CTC marking be solid letters, or outline letters, or what ?
5. Should the CTC marking be on both sides ?
6. Is there a serial number range associated with the CTC variation ?
7. Other than the CTC marking on both sides of the frame near hammer, are there any other characteristics to identify a correct CTC pistol ?
8. Lastly, I have a small Colt New Service Revolvers book by Bob Murphy, which doesn't seem to mention the CTC pistol, but can anyone recommend other research material for learning about the collector Colt 1909 ?
Thanks
 

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Welcome to the Forum,Pancho.

That is certainly a correct 1909 Colt,and while I don't think you are going to find all the details you want on the Cincinnati Trust Co.(other than visiting the bank,which has probably been bought up by a "mega bank chain").

At least I can tell you how that 1909 Colt got to the bank,as Govt. surplus,

In a great article in the 1990 Guns and Ammo Annual,"When The Banks Fought Back",Ed Sanow tells the tale of the "Bank Robbery Defense Program" of the 1920's,

Administered through the Federal Reserve program,member banks could get surplus Colt and S&W model 1917 revolvers and Krag rifles,plus ammo from the vast Govt. stores.

The idea was to help and foil the rash of robberies by shooting back! This is when the automobile,and lack of 2 way radios was giving the robbers an edge.

Ed is,or was,an Indiana lawman,and he goes into detail about some of the guns issued to banks there,and some robberies.

You are probably saying,well,"my gun is a 1909,not a 1917". The article mentions some 1892 .38 Colt Army and Navy revolvers were also issued. Since the 1909s'(those that survived the Phillipine climate!) were being surplused out at this time,it is highly probable that some went to banks also,like the CTC gun. Only a few 1909.s were kept by individual Army officers(and most had a .45 acp cylinder/side plate installed),but the Navy,never one to stress "small arms",kept 1909s in the small arms lockers of some older ships through World War Two.

So,that is "probably" how that nice 1909 got to the cTc!

Frankly,the thought of some "geek" of a teller,with no training,lettting loose with a big Colt or S&W(one handed of course back then!!) is very scary,with .45 cal, slugs flying in all directions. Getting the full length barreled Krags into action,would have been tough in the cofines of a bank.

Frankly,some richer(and smarter!) banks bought smaller Colts and S&Ws out of their own pocket,like a Colt P.P. .38 I nearly bought,owned by a Boston bank. A little easier for the "untrained" to handle.

Murphy's book is "TOPS",but scattered around various gun books and magazines,over the years,are great and informative articles on the New Service.

Hope this helps,and I don't think even Dillinger would have liked staring down the muzzle of that 1909!

Bud
 

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Pancho,
Not to confuse the issue but I have two revolvers that have the same markings as you do on your 1909. When I got the first one I was told that the CTC marking was for Cleveland Trust Company. I live in northern Ohio so it was beleivable that they were from Cleveland rather than Cincinnati. Where did you get your information that they were from Cincinnati?
The two revolvers I have are both commercial guns. The first that I have is a S&W M&P in 38 Special. The second is a Colt PP also in 38 Special. As far as the production dates on these pistols I'm not sure as I have never ran the numbers and am at work right now so I can't post them. I can say that from what features they have both are early guns probably from no later than the 1920's.
As far as how they are marked the S&W has the CTC marking on both sides of the frame where the Colt only has it on one side.
Van
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
They are not mine, just photos I've gotten from other collectors of their guns, but am interested in getting a ctc marked 1909. "Cincinnati" came from just conversing with other collectors. You fellows have been very helpful. I also posted this exact same query on the jouster pistol board, and got nothing but pointless and snotty responses. The responses on ColtForum are clearly superior, in the interest of gun collecting. Thank you all very much. You are welcomed to visit my website, www.panchogun.com and take a peek at my collection. I think the 1909 is a very attractive pistol, and would like to have a few representations of this piece in my collection. Again, thank you all very much for your help. Pancho
PS. I own one that seems to have been internally threaded for a silencer. Will post some photos next week.
 
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