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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got this pretty rough looking Winchester 74 because I was intrigued by the old type of action. It was dusty and dirty, and had some surface rust that cleaned right off. It has several stains and dings in the barrel, down to white metal. But for $75 I figured it would make another plinker. It actually looks very nice after all. I test fired it and it cycled fine, and was quite accurate at the things I was plinking at. Kind of a funny looking, prewar design. From 1942 before production stopped for the war.




 

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Friday night I rediscovered an old Winchester 67 that I forgot I had. It's a 1934-35 year model with the finger groove stock. I cleaned it that night.

Both Saturday evening and this evening, I carried it to the pasture to shoot. What a joy to shoot. It was nice not having to stop and load a magazine, just reach in my back pocket for a fresh cartridge and load the chamber. Golf balls and shotgun hulls doesn't stand a chance.

I'm sure you'll enjoy your Winchester 74.

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Joe, Yep, just got back from my environ: a desert cattle tank. It's sights are right on. When I brought it home I pulled the big bolt assembly which was very cruddy, and immersed it in kerosene. Then after that flushed most of the gunk out, I went to CLP and rags and Q-tips. But some kero is still in there, it keeps blowing a mist of it out the back, right at your eye. All the more reason to always wear glasses when shooting these old antiques. I'm sure with another half box, that will stop.
 

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The Model 74 was always a popular rifle with more than 400,000 being manufactured before it was discontinued. Had one in .22 Short way back when.
 

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Nice plinking rifle you have there Azshot, I hope you enjoy the heck out of it.
Boy is this funny, I have a 1949 coming that I paid $106 or something like that for. My grandpa had one and that is what I learned to shoot on. I had it for years, but he made me decide between it and a 1897, 16 gage, Winchester pump. I choose the shotgun and give the 74 to my older cousin. I have been waiting to get one of my own and I have a scope for it that is just waiting to be mounted on it. I carried this rifle from the time I was 10 or so until I was 16 or 17 when I had to give it up. My grandpa died a few years later when I was in army, and I have one more rifle to get, a 1926 30-30 Winchester 94. I will probably settle for a different year, but I like the looks of a 1926.
 

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I almost bought one. Local shop had one and I looked at it, overall pretty good and a very nice bore, but when we were back there it was gone, only to find out it wasn't put back up on the wall hangers.
By then I had acquired a Winchester Model 77, and it is a dream boat of a .22 rifle imo. I always liked the Ruger 10-22, but this Model 77 makes the 10-22 seem clunky in comparison.
 

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Thanks Joe, Yep, just got back from my environ: a desert cattle tank. It's sights are right on. When I brought it home I pulled the big bolt assembly which was very cruddy, and immersed it in kerosene. Then after that flushed most of the gunk out, I went to CLP and rags and Q-tips. But some kero is still in there, it keeps blowing a mist of it out the back, right at your eye. All the more reason to always wear glasses when shooting these old antiques. I'm sure with another half box, that will stop.
Blow the action w/an air hose after using kerosene,it'll help keep it out of your eyes.I do that every time when I clean any semi-auto.
 

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Blow the action w/an air hose after using kerosene,it'll help keep it out of your eyes.I do that every time when I clean any semi-auto.
I have small cans of air, probably CO2, from Harbor Freight that I use for blowing off the reloading press as well as cleaning our guns.

One nice thing about my Model 77, is the barrel can be removed, so its easy to clean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I didn't know about the Lend Lease ones going to British Home Guard/invasion defense. Pretty interesting, there is a site somewhere that shows the scoped and silenced version.

I read up on the 74 more. It seems in the 1930s people wanted a mid-priced auto from Winchester. The model 63 was too expensive. I've got one of those too, and it's a dream. But this thing with it's long barrel, solid steel forgings, and nice walnut is not bad at all!

Shot it again yesterday, works fine, lasts a long time as we said in the Navy.


 

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Was at a gun show recently and looked at several 74's. Been looking at them for a while now. Never did buy one but reading this post has rekindled my interest in the ole 74. I really like the old Winchester 22's. Usually shoot the 63 and the 69 and a 74 will make a very nice addition.
 

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Was at a gun show recently and looked at several 74's. Been looking at them for a while now. Never did buy one but reading this post has rekindled my interest in the ole 74. I really like the old Winchester 22's. Usually shoot the 63 and the 69 and a 74 will make a very nice addition.
These older .22 rifles are in a lass of their own. I had a Model 69 but ended up getting a Model 69A with a grooved receiver which I really like.
 

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Nice old rifle...brings back memories of squirrel hunting with an uncle that used one of these in .22 short. It was/is very cosmetically challenged, but is one of my treasured possessions in his memory.

BTW...this may be something you are already aware of, but if not this may save you some grief...DO NOT try to cock the action while it is on "safe" or it will lock-up and is the dickens to get it released. And when removing the bolt for disassembly keep the button "fully" depressed or you will certainly scratch the blueing. Don't ask me how I know these things. :D

Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Yeah, I discovered some of those safety tips. I don't think I'd try to cock an old gun on safe, but you never know.

I always liked the strange actions on .22s from the early days. When I was a boy, and later, they just looked very rudimentary, strange and unwieldy to me. Look at this action, with it's long tube, or the Mossberg 51, or Remington 550 for other examples. But really, when you shoulder this rifle, it feels very pointable and it's got an adult size stock.

Nice wood on that one CJS! Amazing how they kept the nice walnut coming even that late, that's about AA quality. What is that slot under the serial number on the left receiver? Mine doesn't have that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
OK, operation Kerosene Blowback has ceased. After a spirited bout of Plinko-Roman wrestling, it's now firing without spraying my glasses and functioning perfectly.

I took Jim's advice and decided to blow out the bolt with some air. Didn't want to fire up the air compressor and scare the packrats in the garage, so found a bottle of canned air. These have to be disassembled from a fired bolt, not cocked. Being the industrious sort, I wanted to protect the firing pin. So I grabbed an empty .22 case from my cleaning box, and after some fiddling, got it started into the chamber. There is no bolt hold open either, except your thumb. Let it fly forward, locked and loaded (the empty), clicked the trigger, and ready to disassemble! Hmmm....that trigger click sounded a little weak.

Pushed the rear bolt release button. Pulled the op rod. No joy. pulled harder, stuck solid. Now I panic. I'd read about these 74s, and you do NOT want to cock one with the safety on, it will jam the action and you can't ever open it again without blow torches. Safety is off, it's not that. Sheeze....what did I do? Pulled harder, that action is not budging, and I cannot cock it. Oh man, I must have broken the firing pin inside there! 75 years of who knows how many people jimmying with this gun, and I break it the 3rd disassembly.

Then I thought; could the .22 case be stuck? Nah...it's just a damn .22, once fired. That action should eject it with my firm pulling. But to be sure I got a cleaning rod and ran it down the barrel and tapped it. Nothing...the bold is locked up, springs and splintered firing pins making the action into a workshop can of screws. Maybe I should tap the cleaning rod a tad harder....Bonka....while pulling the op rod. Presto! The bolt retracts, the .22 extracts, and I grab it with my little fingers and throw it on the table! Push the button, remove the bolt assembly, blow out the action with canned air. Gingerly reassemble.

Took it out to the desert and works fine, lasts a long time. Thanks JIM, you forgot to mention don't try to outsmart the gun....
 

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Hi, some years ago I shot a silenced 74 which came in the original Halliburton type case and had been an OSS weapon for assassination in WWII. My working assumption was that someone considered a very quiet 22 to be the ideal such weapon for use from a window facing narrow European streets when particularly undesirable axis types were passing by. Regards, Ron
 

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OK, operation Kerosene Blowback has ceased. After a spirited bout of Plinko-Roman wrestling, it's now firing without spraying my glasses and functioning perfectly.

I took Jim's advice and decided to blow out the bolt with some air. Didn't want to fire up the air compressor and scare the packrats in the garage, so found a bottle of canned air. These have to be disassembled from a fired bolt, not cocked. Being the industrious sort, I wanted to protect the firing pin. So I grabbed an empty .22 case from my cleaning box, and after some fiddling, got it started into the chamber. There is no bolt hold open either, except your thumb. Let if fly, lock and load (the empty), click the trigger, and ready to disassemble! Hmmm....that trigger click sounded a little weak.

Pushed the rear bolt release button. Pulled the op rod. No joy. pulled harder, stuck solid. Now I panic. I'd read about these 74s, and you do NOT want to cock one with the safety on, it will jam the action and you can't ever open it again without blow torches. Safety is off, it's not that. Sheeze....what did I do? Pulled harder, that action is not budging, and I cannot cock it. Oh man, I must have broken the firing pin inside there! 75 years of who knows how many people jimmying with this gun, and I break it the 3rd disassembly.

Then I thought; could the .22 case be stuck? Nah...it's just a damn .22, once fired. That action should eject it with my firm pulling. But to be sure I got a cleaning rod and ran it down the barrel and tapped it. Nothing...the bold is locked up, springs and splintered firing pins making the action into a workshop can of screws. Maybe I should tap the cleaning rod a tad harder....Bonka....while pulling the op rod. Presto! The bolt retracts, the .22 extracts, and I grab it with my little fingers and throw it on the table! Push the button, remove the bolt assembly, blow out the action with canned air. Gingerly reassemble.

Took it out to the desert and works fine, lasts a long time. Thanks JIM, you forgot to mention don't try to outsmart the gun....

Many yrs ago I was teaching my 2 girls how to train dogs & horses & I told them what the most important rule was for doing it & this also applies to guns,"1st you've got to be smarter than the animal"
 

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Many yrs ago I was teaching my 2 girls how to train dogs & horses & I told them what the most important rule was for doing it & this also applies to guns,"1st you've got to be smarter than the animal"
Well that explains why the dog is in charge around here.
 
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